Natural Language


Microsoft harvests unintentional audio in program that listens to Xbox users via Cortana and Kinect

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Microsoft's listening program continues to grow in scope after a new report reveals that contractors harvested unintentional audio from Xbox users through Cortana and the Kinect. Motherboard reports that Xbox users were recorded by Microsoft as part of a program to analyze users' voice-commands for accuracy and that those recordings were assessed by human contractors. While the program was designed to only scrape audio uttered after a wake-word, contractors hired by Microsoft report that some recordings were taken accidentally without provocation. The practice, reports Motherboard, has been ongoing for several years since the early days of Xbox One and predates Xbox's integration with its voice assistant, Cortana. Xbox users were being recorded by Microsoft in a listening program that scraped audio from Cortana and its augmented reality hardware, Kinect.


As Search Engines Increasingly Turn To AI They Are Harming Search

#artificialintelligence

For more than half a century our digital search engines have relied upon the humble keyword. Yet over the past few years, search engines of all kinds have increasingly turned to deep learning-powered categorization and recommendation algorithms to augment and slowly replace the traditional keyword search. Behavioral and interest-based personalization has further eroded the impact of keyword searches, meaning that if ten people all search for the same thing, they may all get different results. As search engines depreciate traditional raw "search" in favor of AI-assisted navigation, the concept of informational access is being harmed and our digital world is being redefined by the limitations of today's AI. At first glance, the evolution of search from simple TF-IDF keyword queries into today's AI-powered personalized digital navigation is a positive step towards making the digital world more accessible to the general public.


Cat-heavy puzzle game will take you to A.I. school Cult of Mac

#artificialintelligence

Do you want a fun iPhone game that combines cats with a stealth lesson in artificial intelligence and machine learning? And thanks to the oddly titled while True: learn(), you're about to get your chance. Check out the game's new trailer, which landed ahead of this week's release of while True: learn() on iOS. As can be seen from the above trailer, the game's story deals with a cat who's also a master programmer. You set about making a cat-to-human translation program, and wind up developing a whole bunch of other AI tools, too.


14 of the Best AI Chatbot Platforms to Increase Your Conversions in 2019

#artificialintelligence

Have you ever placed an order through the Starbucks app? If you have, you might have noticed that an AI-powered chatbot takes your order. You can speak to it or type in your message. These AI chatbot platform will help you when your order is expected to be ready and the total cost. Similarly, the Pizza Hut chatbot on Facebook messenger can help you order your pizza. It can tell you all about their ongoing deals too. Smart businesses are integrating conversational chatbots into their inbound marketing strategies.


How Artificial Intelligence Is Revolutionizing The E-Commerce Industry

#artificialintelligence

Artifical Intelligence, the e-commerce industry can improve customer experience with personalization, targeting potential customers to increase sales, and recommending them products based on their purchase and browsing behavior. According to an article published by Business Insider, early 85% of all customer interactions is going to be managed without human support by 2020. Considering this advancing trend, many e-commerce businesses have begun to use different forms of artificial intelligence technology for understanding their customers better, offering them the best user experience, and generating more sales and revenues. Often it happens that the customers, after browsing the e-commerce website for a while, abandon their search and leave the website. This generally happens when the customers are not able to find enough relevant product results.


The Time for AI Is Now. Here's Why

#artificialintelligence

You hear a lot these days about the sheer transformative power of AI. There's pure intelligence: DeepMind's algorithms readily beat humans at Go and StarCraft, and DeepStack triumphs over humans at no-limit hold'em poker. Often, these silicon brains generate gameplay strategies that don't resemble anything from a human mind. There's astonishing speed: algorithms routinely surpass radiologists in diagnosing breast cancer, eye disease, and other ailments visible from medical imaging, essentially collapsing decades of expert training down to a few months. Although AI's silent touch is mainly felt today in the technological, financial, and health sectors, its impact across industries is rapidly spreading.


Seeing how computers 'think' helps humans stump machines and reveals AI weaknesses

#artificialintelligence

Researchers from the University of Maryland have figured out how to reliably create such questions through a human-computer collaboration, developing a dataset of more than 1,200 questions that, while easy for people to answer, stump the best computer answering systems today. The system that learns to master these questions will have a better understanding of language than any system currently in existence. The work is described in an article published in the 2019 issue of the journal Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics. "Most question-answering computer systems don't explain why they answer the way they do, but our work helps us see what computers actually understand," said Jordan Boyd-Graber, associate professor of computer science at UMD and senior author of the paper. "In addition, we have produced a dataset to test on computers that will reveal if a computer language system is actually reading and doing the same sorts of processing that humans are able to do."


Japanese-language students from South Asian countries see plunge in visa approval rates

The Japan Times

NAGOYA – The approval rate for visa applications by nationals of countries such as Myanmar and Bangladesh to study at Japanese-language schools from April is sharply down from the same month last year, school operators in Japan said Wednesday. The plunge in the percentage of visas that were approved appears to reflect efforts to crack down on foreign nationals who enter the nation to work under the guise of being students. A survey by the Japanese Language School Association in Tokyo showed that student visas were granted to just 15 percent of applicants from Myanmar, down sharply from the 76 percent approval rate seen last year, and to 21 percent of Bangladeshi applicants, down from 61 percent. The success rate for Sri Lankan applicants was 21 percent, down from 50 percent. The survey drew responses from 327 of the 708 Japanese-language schools throughout the country and collected figures regarding applications for student resident status from April, when such applications peak with the start of the new academic year.


Google makes software to read aloud sign language

#artificialintelligence

Google says it has made it possible for a smartphone to interpret and "read aloud" sign language. The tech firm has not made an app of its own but has published algorithms which it hopes developers will use to make their own apps. Until now, this type of software has only worked on PCs. Campaigners from the hearing-impaired community have welcomed the move, but say the tech might struggle to fully grasp some conversations. In an AI blog, Google research engineers Valentin Bazarevsky and Fan Zhang said the intention of the freely published technology was to serve as "the basis for sign language understanding".


Organised fraud: foiling the perfect crime with analytics and AI

#artificialintelligence

The digital age has brought with it an unparalleled opportunity for progress, greater connectivity and efficiency. However, where there is opportunity there is also criminality. Fraud has become truly globalised, with the internet serving as its most lucrative vector. While a great deal of fraud is still committed by opportunistic lone operators, there is a growing contingent of organised, well-resourced outfits able to use the latest technologies to scam their victims. Indeed, between 31 per cent and 45 per cent of UK frauds are linked to organised crime groups (OCGs).