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New laws of robotics needed to tackle AI: expert

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Decades after Isaac Asimov first wrote his laws for robots, their ever-expanding role in our lives requires a radical new set of rules, legal and AI expert Frank Pasquale warned on Thursday. The world has changed since sci-fi author Asimov in 1942 wrote his three rules for robots, including that they should never harm humans, and today's omnipresent computers and algorithms demand up-to-date measures. According to Pasquale, author of "The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms Behind Money and Information", four new legally-inspired rules should be applied to robots and AI in our daily lives. "The first is that robots should complement rather than substitute for professionals" Pasquale told AFP on the sidelines of a robotics conference at the Vatican's Pontifical Academy of Sciences. "Rather than having a robot doctor, you should hope that you have a doctor who really understands how AI works and gets really good advice from AI, but ultimately it's a doctor's decision to decide what to do and what not to do." "The second is that we need to stop robotic arms races. There's a lot of people right now who are investing in war robots, military robots, policing robots."


r/artificial - An intermediate step to self driving cars could be services that monitor and take control of cars when they get stuck

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I know this is the real reason Elon is building satellite internet. I require the ability to take a nap while driving to the store. As wonderful as it is to have Lyft drivers become coders, I mean mechanics, they can do this instead.


Teaching AI how to feel FEAR could make autonomous cars better drivers, study suggests

Daily Mail - Science & tech

'Physiological changes are correlated with these biological preparations to protect one-self from danger.' According to the researchers, teaching the algorithm when a person might feel more anxious in a given situation could serve as a guide to help machines avoid risks. 'Our hypothesis is that such reward functions can circumvent the challenges associated with sparse and skewed rewards in reinforcement learning settings and can help improve sample efficiency,' the team explains. The researchers put the autonomous software through a simulated maze filled with walls and ramps to see how they performed with fear instilled in them. And, compared to an AI that was trained based only on wall proximity, the system that had learned fear was much less likely to crash. 'A major advantage of training a reward on a signal correlated with the sympathetic nervous system responses is that the rewards are non-sparse - the negative reward starts to show up much before the car collides,' the researchers wrote. 'This leads to efficiency in training and with proper design can lead to policies that are also aligned with the desired mission.'


Toyota considers offering self-driving technology to ride-hailing firms in Asia

The Japan Times

NAGOYA - Toyota Motor Corp. is considering offering autonomous driving technologies to ride-hailing firms, sources close to the matter said Thursday, in its latest push to become a company offering not only cars but also various mobility services. The automaker is planning to supply a new driverless system to be developed with U.S. ride-hailing giant Uber Technologies Inc. to companies such as Grab Taxi Holdings Pte Ltd. of Singapore and ANI Technologies Pvt. Ltd.'s Ola of India, the sources said. Toyota said last month it will jointly invest $1 billion in Uber's new subsidiary to develop autonomous vehicles, together with SoftBank Group Corp. and auto parts supplier Denso Corp. SoftBank Group is the biggest shareholder in Uber and has also invested in Grab and Ola. Toyota is also a stakeholder in Grab, which has a wide range of businesses across Southeast Asia.


Digital camera sees around corners by guessing what's lurking behind

New Scientist

Seeing the out-of-sight has turned a new corner. Now, digital cameras can take an image of an object hidden around a wall, which could help autonomous cars detect hazards in blind spots. In principle, any vertical edge can act as an accidental camera, by projecting subtle patterns of light onto the ground. These patterns reveal a semblance of what is happening on the other side of the edge and, though too faint to be noticed by the human eye, can be enhanced and interpreted by imaging algorithms.


A Confused Police Officer Pulled Over a Self-Driving Vehicle on Its First Day Carrying Passengers

TIME - Tech

A self-driving shuttle got pulled over by police on its first day carrying passengers on a new Rhode Island route. Providence Police Chief Hugh Clements says an officer pulled over the odd-looking autonomous vehicle because he had never seen one before. The bus-like vehicle operated by Michigan-based May Mobility was dropping off passengers Wednesday morning when a police cruiser arrived with blinking lights and a siren. It was just hours after the public launch of a state-funded pilot shuttle service. The shuttle offers free rides on a 12-stop urban loop.


Curious cop pulls over self-driving vehicle on passenger-carrying project's debut day

The Japan Times

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND - A self-driving shuttle got pulled over by police on its first day carrying passengers on a new Rhode Island route. Providence Police Chief Hugh Clements said an officer pulled over the odd-looking autonomous vehicle because he had never seen one before. "It looked like an oversize golf cart," Clements said. The vehicle, operated by Michigan-based May Mobility, was dropping off passengers Wednesday morning at Providence's Olneyville Square when a police cruiser arrived with blinking lights and a siren. It was just hours after the public launch of a state-funded pilot for a shuttle service called "Little Roady."


Why did a Rhode Island police officer pull over a self-driving shuttle on its first day?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Elizabeth Keatinge tells us about Tesla's Autonomy Investor Day where robotaxis were discussed. PROVIDENCE, R.I. – A self-driving shuttle got pulled over by police on its first day carrying passengers on a new Rhode Island route. Providence Police Chief Hugh Clements said an officer pulled over the odd-looking autonomous vehicle because he had never seen one before. "It looked like an oversize golf cart," Clements said. The vehicle, operated by Michigan-based May Mobility, was dropping off passengers Wednesday morning at Providence's Olneyville Square when a police cruiser arrived with blinking lights and a siren.


Five creative jobs artificial intelligence can undertake

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This summer, furniture company Kartell will start selling a new plastic chair designed by Philippe Starck – with some help. The system used – not, perhaps, strictly an AI – was a generative design software platform from Autodesk. Supplied with initial design goals, along with parameters such as materials, manufacturing methods and cost constraints, the software explores all the possible permutations of a solution to generate design alternatives. It tests and learns from each iteration what works and what doesn't. "As the relationship between the two matured, the system became a much stronger collaborative partner, and began to anticipate Starck's preferences and the way he likes to work," says Mark Davis, senior director of design futures at Autodesk.


Smart speakers like Alexa and Google are 'SEXIST'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Smart home devices understand men better than women, according to a new YouGov survey. It found 67 per cent of female owners say that their device fails to respond to a voice command at least'sometimes', compared to 54 per cent of male owners. It also revealed men are ruder to their devices but experience fewer problems being understood. Men are more likely to take an brusque tone with theirs than women yet women have more problems with getting a response to their commands. The smart devices seem to respond less well to women than men, based on the survey results.