Games


Hey, Siri, how about some shortcuts to help save me some time. Siri says, 'Sure'

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Who wouldn't like to get more done in less time? That's the idea behind Siri Shortcuts, a popular Apple app for iPhone and iPad, and built into the upcoming iOS 13 operating system, out in beta release now with a full upgrade due this fall soon after new iPhones hit in September. As the name suggests, Siri Shortcuts link the voice-controlled personal assistant you already know with time-saving shortcuts for tasks you want to perform. By simply asking for it – or tapping the screen if you're not in a place to freely use your voice – your iPhone or iPad can quickly heed your request. In other words, Siri Shortcuts – previously known as Workflow – fuses small actions to yield big results.


Introduction to Machine Learning

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This story started in mid 60 in the last century. Scientists and engineers found a lot of problems that were too complicated for traditional algorithms that it was not possible to create a program that could have possibly solved the problem. Imagine a case where you have an object that is descirbed by 21 properties (as an input) and based on these properties you need to classify it to group A or to the group B. How would you solve the problem? Would you need to analyze all the 21 attributes and for all their possible combinations say whether your object is in group A or B. That means you would need to write 5.1090942e 19 instructions like IF statements. This is not possible at all I think!


DeepMind's Losses and the Future of Artificial Intelligence

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Alphabet's DeepMind lost $572 million last year. DeepMind, likely the world's largest research-focused artificial intelligence operation, is losing a lot of money fast, more than $1 billion in the past three years. DeepMind also has more than $1 billion in debt due in the next 12 months. Does this mean that AI is falling apart? Gary Marcus is founder and CEO of Robust.AI and a professor of psychology and neural science at NYU.


DeepMind's Losses and the Future of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Alphabet's DeepMind lost $572 million last year. DeepMind, likely the world's largest research-focused artificial intelligence operation, is losing a lot of money fast, more than $1 billion in the past three years. DeepMind also has more than $1 billion in debt due in the next 12 months. Does this mean that AI is falling apart? Gary Marcus is founder and CEO of Robust.AI and a professor of psychology and neural science at NYU.


DeepMind's Losses and the Future of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Alphabet's DeepMind lost $572 million last year. DeepMind, likely the world's largest research-focused artificial intelligence operation, is losing a lot of money fast, more than $1 billion in the past three years. DeepMind also has more than $1 billion in debt due in the next 12 months. Does this mean that AI is falling apart? Gary Marcus is founder and CEO of Robust.AI and a professor of psychology and neural science at NYU.


What just happened? The rise of interest in Artificial Intelligence

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Artificial Intelligence, or AI for short, has become quite the public buzzword. Companies and investors are pouring money into the field. Universities -- even high schools -- are rushing to start new degree programs or colleges dedicated to AI. Civil society organizations are scrambling to understand the impact of AI technology on humanity, and governments are competing to encourage or regulate AI research and deployment. One country, the United Arab Emirates, even boasts a minister for AI. At the same time, the world's militaries are developing AI-based weaponry to defeat their enemies, police agencies are experimenting with AI as a surveillance tool to identify or interrogate suspects, and companies are testing its ability to replace humans in menial or more meaningful jobs -- all of which may change the equation of life for all of the world's people.


Blockchain, AI, and the end of doctors? Middle East Medical Portal

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I should have taken heed of the Socratic paradox that'all I know is that I do not know anything', as in January of 2016, I publicly expressed to the scientific and medical community that'There are certain things that a human brain does much better than any piece of technology – such as solving a crossword puzzle or playing the game Go.' In January of 2016, I was in lofty company, as the majority of the big brains of Artificial Intelligence (AI) felt that it would take at least 50 years for a computer to beat any human at Go. Three months later the Google DeepMind Alpha Go system did just that, when it beat not any average human Go player – but the world's 18-time world Go champion, Lee Sedol. This is a non-trivial occurrence. Because there are many tasks that are performed in healthcare each day by humans, that are well suited to be better performed by intelligent thinking machines. For example, the foundation of healthcare – the diagnosis, consists of pattern recognition and algorithms, both of which are superior strengths of machine over humans. My take away from this is that the changes are occurring much more quickly than I realised, not only in the development of AI, but in many other areas such as the global dispersion of high-speed connectivity, blockchain, plummeting costs of data storage, and tremendous improvements in biosensors of all shapes and sizes. The future that many felt was at least 50 years away, appears to already be behind us – and these powerful thinking machines will not stand alone, but will play a central role in our increasing global connectivity.


Artificial intelligence moving serious gaming: Presenting reusable game AI components

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Computer games have been linked with artificial intelligence (AI) since the first program was designed to play chess (Shannon 1950). The challenge to defeat human expert players in rule-based strategy games such as Chess, Poker and Go has greatly advanced the domain of AI research, affecting breakthroughs in e.g. In turn, such new AI methods have been used in computer games, for instance to enhance graphical realism, to generate levels, sceneries and storylines, to establish player profiles, to balance complexity or to add intelligent behaviours to non-playing characters (NPC; Yannakakis and Togelius 2015, 2018). Over the years, however, various authors (Champandard 2004; Bourassa and Massey 2012; Yannakakis 2012; Yannakakis and Togelius 2018) have pointed at the marginal penetration of academic game AI methods in industrial game production. This limited uptake has been attributed to 1) research projects largely focusing on advanced, but non-scalable projects of little commercial or practical value, and 2) game studios reluctant to adopt and include promising but risky AI techniques (such as neural networks) rather than established, fully scripted technologies in their games.


Fridai - the AI powered voice assistant for gamers is here

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We understand gaming is an epic experience. Us, gamers give the games our full attention, because it's needed to command the various elements, allies and even complex tools gamers have at their disposal. Therefore anything that disturbs this experience is super frustrating. With Fridai, the gamer assistant we use the most natural extension of gaming – voice access – to create voice enabled tools for gamers and transform the gaming experience into a seamless, frictionless one.


r/MachineLearning - AMA: We are Noam Brown and Tuomas Sandholm, creators of the Carnegie Mellon / Facebook multiplayer poker bot Pluribus. We're also joined by a few of the pros Pluribus played against. Ask us anything!

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You are right that the algorithms in Pluribus are totally different than reinforcement learning or MCTS. At a high level, that is because our settings are 1) games, that is, there is more than one player, and 2) of imperfect information, that is, when a player has to choose an action, the player does not know the entire state of the world. There is no good textbook on solving imperfect-information games. So, to read up on this literature, you will need to read research papers. Below in this post are selected papers from my research group that would be good to read given that you want to learn about this field.