Health Care Technology


How Can We Use Artificial Intelligence To Improve Society?

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Disease Diagnosis & Medication: Data privacy and regulatory barriers will cause a delay in disrupting this segment. If the patient is able to access their own data, they should be able to use AI for diagnosis of their X-rays or MRI scans as a second opinion. A soldier in war zones can get the AR/VR experience with instructions to help treat themselves and remove a bullet. DNA based personalized medicine to extend the life of humans. Robots to remind you to take medicine pills (e.g.


AI could solve the healthcare staffing crisis and become our radiologists of the future

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It is almost 40 years since a full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine was used for the first time to scan a patient and generate diagnostic-quality images. The scanner and signal processing methods needed to produce an image were devised by a team of medical physicists including John Mallard, Jim Hutchinson, Bill Edelstein and Tom Redpath at the University of Aberdeen, leading to the widespread use of the MRI scanner, now a ubiquitous tool in radiology departments across the world. MRI was a game-changer in medical diagnostics because it didn't require exposure to ionising radiation (such as X-rays), and could generate images on multiple cross-sections of the body with superb definition of soft tissues. This allowed, for example, the direct visualisation of the spinal cord for the first time. Most people today will have undergone an MRI or know somebody who has.


Michigan Medicine makes AI, machine learning a top tech priority

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The academic medical center of the University of Michigan is leveraging investments in artificial intelligence, machine learning and advanced analytics to unlock the value of its health data. According to Andrew Rosenberg, MD, chief information officer for Michigan Medicine, the organization currently has 34 ongoing AI and machine leaning projects, 28 of which have principal investigators. "There's a lot of collaboration around these projects--as there should be for the diversity of thought and background needed to deal with complex problems--working with at least seven other U of M schools," Rosenberg told the Machine Learning for Health Care conference on Friday in Ann Arbor, Mich. "That's one of the powers that we enjoy." One of the machine learning projects cited by Rosenberg leverages a combination of electronic health records, monitor data and analytics to predict acute hemodynamic instability--when blood flow drops and deprives the body of oxygen--which is one of the most common causes of death for critically ill or injured patients.


Amazon Machine Learning Award to Accelerate Innovations and Scalability at UPMC-Affiliated Research Alliance

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Thanks to a Machine Learning Research Award from Amazon Web Services (AWS) to a research alliance supported by UPMC Enterprises, a seed has been planted to accelerate the consortium's medical research initiatives, help participating entrepreneurs more rapidly scale their innovations, and, in some small fashion, contribute to positioning the Pittsburgh area as a healthcare technology innovation hub. The award provides researchers access to Amazon's cloud-based platform and machine learning tools, enabling them to incorporate sophisticated technology into innovations at an early stage of the development process. These innovations "will be able to be deployed more easily in the real world," says Rob Hartman, PhD, director of translational science, UPMC Enterprises. The Amazon award was made to the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance (PHDA), which was formed four years ago by UPMC, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon University. PDHA uses "big data" generated in health care--including patient information in the electronic health record, diagnostic imaging, prescriptions, genomic profiles, and insurance records--to transform the way that diseases are treated and prevented, and to better engage patients in their own care, according to a news release.


Elon Musk's Neuralink: Both an evolution and a plan for radical change

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When Elon Musk first started talking about launching a brain-computer interface company, he made a number of comments that set expectations for what that idea might entail. The company, he said, was motivated by his concerns about AI ending up hostile to humans: providing humans with an interface directly into the AI's home turf might prevent hostilities from developing. Musk also suggested that he hoped to avoid any electrodes implanted in the brain, since that might pose a barrier to adoption. At his recent public launch of the company (since named Neuralink), worries about hostile AIs did get a mention--but only in passing. Instead, we got a detailed technical description of the hardware behind Neuralink's brain-computer interface, which would rely on surgery and implanted hardware.


How Artificial Intelligence can revolutionise healthcare

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German based Siemens Healthineers purpose is to enable healthcare providers to increase value by empowering them on their journey towards expanding precision medicine, transforming care delivery, and improving patient experience, all enabled by digitalising healthcare. An estimated five million patients globally everyday benefit from their innovative technologies and services in the areas of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging, laboratory diagnostics and molecular medicine, as well as digital health and enterprise services. They are a leading medical technology company with over 170 years of experience and 18,000 patents globally. With about 50,000 dedicated colleagues in over 70 countries, they will continue to innovate and shape the future of healthcare. Speaking to HEQ, Global Head of Digitalizing Healthcare Joerg Aumueller explains the integration of AI into healthcare and how Siemens Healthineers are leading the change.


Artificial Intelligence all set to Virtualize Radiology Brains

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Accelerating with an exponential growth, artificial intelligence (AI) is all set to move from experimental stages to live industry implementations and all is set to mark its presence across all industry verticals. AI is all about virtualizing human cognitive functions in the form of software brains. For organizations, harnessing AI is not optional, albeit it is critical to stay competitive. Gartner in its recent study (2018), predicts the business value derived from AI to reach $3.9 trillion by 2022. With the disruptive potential, the investments in AI are ever-increasing.


Startups Target AI Opportunities to Disrupt Medical Imaging

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This is part of a series of stories examining how artificial intelligence is disrupting industries. Can artificial intelligence (AI) make health care smarter? Anytime a patient breaks a bone, sprains an ankle or hits their head, the radiology industry goes to work, using x-rays, CT scanners, MRI machines and other tools and techniques to take a closer look inside the human body without the need for surgery. Radiology technicians take the pictures and radiologists examine them to determine the extent of the injury. What if a computer could do the analysis?


Blockchain, AI, and the end of doctors? Middle East Medical Portal

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I should have taken heed of the Socratic paradox that'all I know is that I do not know anything', as in January of 2016, I publicly expressed to the scientific and medical community that'There are certain things that a human brain does much better than any piece of technology – such as solving a crossword puzzle or playing the game Go.' In January of 2016, I was in lofty company, as the majority of the big brains of Artificial Intelligence (AI) felt that it would take at least 50 years for a computer to beat any human at Go. Three months later the Google DeepMind Alpha Go system did just that, when it beat not any average human Go player – but the world's 18-time world Go champion, Lee Sedol. This is a non-trivial occurrence. Because there are many tasks that are performed in healthcare each day by humans, that are well suited to be better performed by intelligent thinking machines. For example, the foundation of healthcare – the diagnosis, consists of pattern recognition and algorithms, both of which are superior strengths of machine over humans. My take away from this is that the changes are occurring much more quickly than I realised, not only in the development of AI, but in many other areas such as the global dispersion of high-speed connectivity, blockchain, plummeting costs of data storage, and tremendous improvements in biosensors of all shapes and sizes. The future that many felt was at least 50 years away, appears to already be behind us – and these powerful thinking machines will not stand alone, but will play a central role in our increasing global connectivity.


Microsoft Quantum Algorithm Boosts Medical Imaging

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Researchers at Microsoft and Case Western Reserve University researchers developed an algorithm for a future quantum computer that served to enhance the speed and quality of medical imaging. Microsoft and Case Western Reserve University researchers have enhanced the speed and quality of medical imaging with an algorithm designed to work on a future quantum computer. The researchers focused on a type of medical imaging called magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF). While running the quantum algorithm on a conventional computer resulted in a significant increase in the speed and precision of the MRF scans, the results would have been even more impressive on a large-enough quantum computer. The development is the latest in a series of projects in which researchers have used algorithms designed for future quantum computers to improve calculations running on today's existing hardware.