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Deep learning AI may identify atrial fibrillation from a normal rhythm ECG - Times of India

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Although early and requiring further research before implementation, the findings could aid doctors investigating unexplained strokes or heart failure, enabling appropriate treatment. Researchers have trained an artificial intelligence model to detect the signature of atrial fibrillation in 10-second electrocardiograms (ECG) taken from patients in normal rhythm. The study, involving almost 181,000 patients and published in The Lancet, is the first to use deep learning to identify patients with potentially undetected atrial fibrillation and had an overall accuracy of 83%. Atrial fibrillation is estimated to affect 2.7–6.1 million people in the United States and is associated with increased risk of stroke, heart failure and mortality. It is difficult to detect on a single ECG because patients' hearts can go in and out of this abnormal rhythm, so atrial fibrillation often goes undiagnosed.


US Army Developing AI-Guided Long-Range Smart Artillery Shell

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The Cannon-Delivered Area Effects Munitions (C-DAEM) is a new 155-millimeter artillery round in development for the Army's M777 howitzer, M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer and new XM1299 self-propelled howitzer. The high-tech shell will be able to guide itself toward its intended target, even in areas where GPS is jammed by enemy forces. The munition, which has a 43-mile range, will take more than a minute to reach its target, and can slow down and guide itself on the way. By doing so, it makes it easier for the Army to hit targets that move around, like vehicles and infantry - although it can't hit a moving target yet. Popular Mechanics notes that C-DAEM will replace the dual purpose improved conventional munition (DPICM), a type of cluster munition that made up for a lack of precision accuracy by scattering bomblets above the battlefield, ensuring it would at least do some damage to its target even if it didn't hit it directly.


America Can Stop China from Dominating Artificial Intelligence--And Should

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China, writes Amy Webb in Inc., has been "building a global artificial intelligence empire, and seeding the tech ecosystem of the future." It has been particularly successful, Webb, the founder of the Future Today Institute, believes. "China is poised to become its undisputed global leader, and that will affect every business," she notes. Not everyone shares Webb's assessment that Chinese researchers are in the lead. America, after all, is home to most leading AI tech.


Facial recognition scanners are already at some US airports. Here's what to know

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Many airports hope to start using biometric scanners in lieu of passports to identify travelers. Buzz60's Tony Spitz has the details. The next time you go to the airport you might notice something different as part of the security process: A machine scanning your face to verify your identity. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been working with airlines to implement biometric face scanners in domestic airports to better streamline security. But how does the process work?


AI and bionic eyes are helping to contain raging wildfires

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On a tower in the Brazilian rain forest, a sentinel scans the horizon for the first signs of fire. They don't blink or take breaks, and guided by artificial intelligence they can tell the difference between a dust cloud, an insect swarm and a plume of smoke that demands quick attention. In Brazil, the devices help keep mining giant Vale working, and protect trees for pulp and paper producer Suzano. The equipment includes optical and thermal cameras, as well as spectrometric systems that identify the chemical makeup of substances. By linking them to artificial intelligence, a small Portugal-based company working with IBM Corp. believes it can help tame the often unpredictable affects of climate change.


Middle East businesses welcome Amazon Web Services region launch

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Amazon Web Services (AWS) has connected the Middle East to its global network with the launch of its Bahrain AWS region. The cloud supplier already has infrastructure in the region, but the launch of the Bahrain AWS region, with three datacentres, will connect to its global network. This will bring the Middle East region up to par with its other global AWS regions as the Middle East accelerates its digital transformation. Andy Jassy, CEO at AWS, said the cloud could unlock digital transformation in the Middle East. "Today, we are launching advanced and secure technology infrastructure that matches the scale of our other AWS regions around the world and are already seeing strong demand in the Middle East for AWS technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, data analytics, IoT [internet of things] and much more," he said.


Learning from Data to Create a Safer and Smarter Self-Driving Experience

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The automotive industry isn't just being driven by people -- it's also driven by data, particularly as automobile manufacturers move toward autonomous, self-driving vehicles. Last year, Waymo cars drove 1.2 million miles in California. Meanwhile, Tesla, with its Autopilot program, is actively collecting data from hundreds of thousands of vehicles to predict how its cars might perform autonomously. So far the company has collected hundreds of millions of miles worth of data. What are these autonomous vehicle manufacturers doing with all of that data?


Here's How Artificial Intelligence Is Fueling Climate Change

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The'AI Apocalypse' might kill humanity before any actual robot uprising Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images You can think of artificial intelligence (AI) in the same way you think about cloud computing, if you think about either of them through an environmental lens: an enormous and growing source of carbon emissions, with the very real potential to choke out humans' ability to breathe clean air long before a sentient and ornery AI goes all Skynet on us. At the moment, data centers--the enormous rooms full of stacks and stacks of servers that juggle dank memes, fire tweets, your vitally important Google docs and all the other data that is stored somewhere other than on your phone and in your home computer--use about 2% of the world's electricity. SEE ALSO: Can Giant Snow-Blowing Cannons Save Earth From Climate Change? Of that, servers that run AI--processing all the data and making the decisions and computations that a machine mimicking a human brain must handle in order to achieve "deep learning"--use about 0.1% of the world's electricity, according to a recent MIT Technology Review article. The likelihood that figure will grow, it turns out, is quite good.


Yemeni Houthis claim drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – Yemen's Houthi movement launched drone attacks on oil facilities in a remote area of Saudi Arabia, the group's Al Masirah TV said Saturday, but there was no immediate confirmation from Saudi authorities or state oil giant Aramco. A Saudi-led coalition is battling the Iran-aligned Houthis to try to restore Yemen's government, which was ousted from power in the capital, Sanaa, by the group in late 2014. The war has been in military stalemate for years. The Houthis have stepped up cross-border missile and drone attacks on Saudi Arabia in recent months. "Ten drones targeted Aramco's Shaybah oilfield and refinery in the first Operation: Balance of Deterrence in the east of the kingdom," the Al Masirah channel reported, citing a Houthi military spokesman.


AI adoption: 40% of company leaders have 'no hesitation'

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Despite perceived employee concerns, US business leaders are moving ahead with adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in the enterprise, according to a Thursday report from Genesys. By 2022, 60% of US company leaders said they expect to be using AI or advanced automation to improve operations, staffing, budgeting, or performance--an increase from the 24% who said they are already doing so. Of the 303 US employers surveyed, 57% said they were enthusiastic about new workplace tech tools including AI and bots. Some 32% said they believe AI enables companies to achieve goals faster, more effectively, and for less money. Another 25% said they believe AI allows employees to become more productive, and feel more valuable, the survey found.