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'Deepfake' videos can be generated with a single photo, research paper says

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Deepfakes are video manipulations that can make people say seemingly strange things. Barack Obama and Nicolas Cage have been featured in these videos. We all know about Mona Lisa's smile. Now, you can watch her talk. A research paper from experts at Samsung's AI Center in Moscow and the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology shows how fake videos can be created with a single image, including the classic artwork.


Google updates Maps, Search and Assistant so you can order food without app

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Google has unveiled updates for its artificially intelligent voice assistant and new privacy tools to give people more control over how they're being tracked on the go or at home. The company also unveiled a new Pixel phone and smart home display. Google just made ordering pizza, pad thai and fried chicken from your favorite restaurants even easier. The search giant announced on Thursday that it updated apps like Google Maps, Google Search and the Google Assistant to make ordering food online more convenient, so you don't have to download as many third-party apps. "When I was pregnant with my son last year, my cravings were completely overpowering," said Google's senior product manager of food ordering, Anantica Singh, in a blog post.


The coolest Amazon accessory is finally back in stock—and it's crazy cheap right now

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The Echo Wall Clock looks classic but acts futuristic. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. However, our picks and opinions are independent from USA TODAY's newsroom and any business incentives. If you own an Amazon Echo smart speaker, you need to keep reading. Last last year, Amazon started teasing the Echo Wall Clock, an Alexa-connected device that syncs with your Echo to display visual timers and alarms.


Amazon is reportedly working on an Alexa-powered wearable that reads human emotions

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Amazon Echo devices are compatible with a multitude of smart home products. Amazon is reportedly developing a voice-activated wearable device that can recognize human emotions. If successful, the health product could help the company improve its targeted advertisements and make better product recommendations, reports Bloomberg. The unnamed device could also advise humans on how to better interact with others. A source showed Bloomberg internal Amazon documents that revealed a few details about the futuristic health and wellness product.


Amazon shareholders reject banning sale of facial recognition software to law enforcement

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San Francisco supervisors approved a ban on police using facial recognition technology, making it the first city in the U.S. with such a restriction. Amazon shareholders will continue selling the company's facial recognition technology "Rekognition" to governments and law enforcement agencies. During the e-commerce giant's annual meeting Wednesday, shareholders rejected all proposals including two related to Rekognition, Amazon confirmed to USA TODAY. One proposed banning the sales of the technology and the other called for the company to conduct an independent study and issue a report on the risks of governments using the technology. Amazon did not release shareholder vote totals Wednesday but said information would be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission later in the week.


Ice T scolds Amazon after claiming he almost shot driver during delivery

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Amazon might want to consider placing more of its delivery drivers in uniforms, based on a comment from one of its higher-profile customers. Ice T, the rapper who later became a TV star on "Law & Order: SVU," posted a tweet on Tuesday claiming he almost shot one of the tech giant's drivers who was "creeping up to my crib" the night before to complete a delivery. "Message To Amazon: Now that you have regular people making your home deliveries.. Maybe they should wear a Vest with AMAZON DELIVERY on it," said Ice T on Twitter. In a follow-up tweet, Ice T said he wasn't mad at the delivery person but noted it's not safe for the drivers to operate without some type of uniform. Message To Amazon: Now that you have regular people making your home deliveries.. Maybe they should wear a Vest with AMAZON DELIVERY on it..... Amazon customer service reached out to Ice T on Twitter, saying his comments would be escalated to the company's logistics team for review.


how-much-should-you-spend-on-a-robot-vacuum

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However, early models proved that they weren't quite up to the task, yet were still somehow priced beyond what the average person could afford. Fortunately, it's a technology that is advancing rapidly. There are now far more affordable robot vacuums and the options are getting more effective and feature-rich with each passing cycle. The ever-expanding landscape leaves you with a plethora of options to choose from, and at this point you might not asking "should I get a robot vacuum" but rather "which robot vacuum should I get?" Here are some considerations to take into account as you decide.


Postal Service to test autonomous semi trucks for hauling mail across state lines

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The Postal Service is experimenting with self-driving long-haul semi trucks to transport mail between distribution centers. The U.S. Postal Service is testing its first long-haul self-driving delivery truck in a two-week pilot program that will use an autonomous tractor-trailer to deliver mail between distribution centers in Phoenix and Dallas. TuSimple, a self-driving truck company, is providing the vehicle and will have a safety engineer and driver in the cab to monitor its performance and take control if there are any issues, the company said in announcing the test Tuesday. The Postal Service has been exploring the idea for some time, recently soliciting bids to put semi-autonomous mail trucks on the road in a few years that allow a human to sort the mail while being autonomously driven along the route. "We are conducting research and testing as part of our efforts to operate a future class of vehicles which will incorporate new technology to accommodate a diverse mail mix, enhance safety, improve service, reduce emissions, and produce operational savings," said Postal Service spokeswoman Kim Frum.


Hey Siri, turn on 'The Voice' for my Vizio TV

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Sure, Siri can open Netflix for you and search for a George Clooney movie, but only if you spring $179 to $199 for the Apple TV accessory streamer. Now, Apple's personal assistant can turn on the TV, change the channel and find a specific TV show, on certain newer TVs from Vizio, Samsung, Sony and LG. It's part of a radical rethink on Apple's part to bring Apple outside of the ecosystem, and onto mainstream television sets. Samsung pushed out Apple's AirPlay features on new smart TVs that began shipping May 13. AirPlay lets you mirror what's on your device.


If facial recognition is good enough for Taylor Swift, is it good enough for you?

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In this Oct. 31, 2018, file photo, a man, who declined to be identified, has his face painted to represent efforts to defeat facial recognition during a protest at Amazon headquarters over the company's facial recognition system, "Rekognition," in Seattle. San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies. These days, with facial recognition technology, you've got a face that can launch a thousand applications, so to speak. Sure, you may love the ease of opening your phone just by facing it instead of tapping in a code. But how do you feel about having your mug scanned, identifying you as you drive across a bridge, when you board an airplane or to confirm you're not a stalker on your way into a Taylor Swift concert?