educational setting


AI is biased, you'll see if you Google 'hands'

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As it is, the world is unfair. The question now is, do we want automated tech to be unfair too? As we build more and more AI-dependent smart digital infrastructure in our cities and beyond, we have pretty much overlooked the emerging character of artificial intelligence that would have a profound bearing on our nature and future. Are we happy with algorithms making decisions for us? Naturally, one would expect the algorithm to possess discretion.


Española teens win robot contest in China

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Before Zachariah Apodaca and Brandon and Benjamin Sandoval arrived in China for an international robotics competition, the Española-area teenagers worried about weight limits. Together, their robot -- designed to water rows of plants in a greenhouse, and all of the motors, pumps, and tools that go with it -- were well over the 100-pound threshold for extra airline baggage fees. So the team secured as many fragile parts that could fit into the heavy-duty travel case donated by the Española Fire Department and separated the less-delicate but still precious cargo in an assortment of suitcases. Once in a Beijing hotel room, they nervously opened everything. To their relief, nothing was broken.


The robots are coming for your job, too

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"There's no simple answer," said Stuart Russell, a computer scientist at UC Berkeley, an adjunct professor of neurological surgery at UC San Francisco and the author of a forthcoming book, "Human Compatible: Artificial Intelligence and the Problem of Control." "But in the long run nearly all current jobs will go away, so we need fairly radical policy changes to prepare for a very different future economy. In his book, Russell writes, "One rapidly emerging picture is that of an economy where far fewer people work because work is unnecessary." That's either a very frightening or a tantalizing prospect, depending very much on whether and how much you (and/or society) think people ought to have to work and how society is going to put a price on human labor. There will be less work in manufacturing, less work in call centers, less work driving trucks, and more work in health care and home care and construction. MIT Technology Review tried to track all the different reports on the effect ...


Microsoft Research launches a center for creating projects that can have real-world societal impact

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Microsoft Research India has announced the launch of a center for Societal impact through Cloud and Artificial Intelligence (SCAI). Part of the Microsoft Research (MSR) Lab in Bengaluru, SCAI will focus on creating and nurturing projects and transitioning them from lab to scale for real-world impact. "There are so many opportunities to leverage recent advances in cloud computing and AI technologies to address long-term societal challenges spanning multiple sectors and realms, including health and wellness, education, transportation, and agriculture," said Eric Horvitz, Technical Fellow and Director at Microsoft Research. SCAI will engage with NGOs, academicians, and startups through external collaborations; graduate and undergraduate students through the SCAI Fellow program in collaboration; and actively seek collaborators through calls for proposals. To start with, Microsoft is currently working with four organizations – Respirer Living Sciences for a project focusing on urban air pollution, NIMHANS for a project on mental health, Pratham Books for assisted translation system which enables children to read storybooks in multiple languages, and Voicedeck Technologies for Learn2Earn, a program which reinforces education and rewards learning through financial incentives.


Bill Gates Says This Type of AI Will Be Worth "10 Microsofts" The Motley Fool

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Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) founder Bill Gates was speaking to a group of college students in 2004. According to The New York Times, Gates was a bit concerned about the decline in the number of computer science majors, as well as the notion that the field had matured and there weren't many breakthroughs left to achieve in the area. One student expressed doubt that there would ever be another tech company as successful as Microsoft. ''If you invent a breakthrough in artificial intelligence, so machines can learn, that is worth 10 Microsofts.'' Fast-forward to today, and of course someone has figured it out.


Bill Gates Says This Type of AI Will Be Worth "10 Microsofts"

#artificialintelligence

Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) founder Bill Gates was speaking to a group of college students in 2004. According to The New York Times, Gates was a bit concerned about the decline in the number of computer science majors, as well as the notion that the field had matured and there weren't many breakthroughs left to achieve in the area. One student expressed doubt that there would ever be another tech company as successful as Microsoft. ''If you invent a breakthrough in artificial intelligence, so machines can learn, that is worth 10 Microsofts.'' Fast-forward to today, and of course someone has figured it out.


Faced with a Data Deluge, Astronomers Turn to Automation

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One astronomer had jumped the gun, tweeting ahead of an official announcement by LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory). The observatory had detected an outburst of gravitational waves, or ripples in spacetime, and an orbiting gamma-ray telescope had simultaneously seen electromagnetic radiation emanating from the same region of space. The observations--which were traced back to a colliding pair of neutron stars 130 million light-years away--marked a pivotal moment for multimessenger astronomy, in which celestial events are studied using a wide range of wildly different telescopes and detectors. The promise of multimessenger astronomy is immense: by observing not only in light but also in gravitational waves and elusive particles called neutrinos, all at once, researchers can gain unprecedented views of the inner workings of exploding stars, galactic nuclei and other exotic phenomena. But the challenges are great, too: as observatories get bigger and more sensitive and monitor ever larger volumes of space, multimessenger astronomy could drown in a deluge of data, making it harder for telescopes to respond in real time to unfolding astrophysical events.


How Artificial Intelligence Enhances Education

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Artificial intelligence has a transformative power. AI changed business, banking, governmental processes, marketing, and any other industry you could think of. Technology has become an inevitable aspect of the way we approach the learning process. During UNESCO's Mobile Learning Week 2019, the participants focused on finding solutions to ensure equitable and inclusive use of AI in education. The organization is focused on offering equal learning opportunities to all people regardless of ethnicity, location, gender, and socio-economic status.


7 Great Free Online Courses to Help You Learn about AI, ML

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Like anything in life, the best way to learn about anything is to get your feet wet. Watch some TedTalks on YouTube, read some blog posts, find forums and groups on social media platforms, and read some books on the subject. But, ultimately, you must be realistic as to whether the subject actually interests you or not. Before you do decide to take the plunge, complete some free courses on the subject or if possible, paid ones and see if it really is for you. Another good piece of advice is to find someone who has done what you are intending to do.


Tyrata expands scientific advisory board with experts in data handling and machine learning

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Tyrata, Inc., a tire sensor, data management and analytics company, has expanded its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) with two experts in complex data handling, machine learning and data analytics. The new board members, both Duke University professors, will focus on optimizing data collection and analytics for the IntelliTread technology platform as Tyrata continues to transform how the tire and transportation industries sense and use tread wear data to improve tire safety, reduce costs, and optimize tire design and maintenance. Tyrata CTO and Scientific Advisory Board leader Aaron Franklin is pleased to welcome Dr. Miroslav Pajic and Dr. Leslie Collins to the committee. Dr. Pajic is an Electrical and Computer Engineering Assistant Professor at Duke University and has a deep understanding of data handling and management in the digital world of automobiles and other complex environments. Dr. Pajic will contribute his expertise to the tread wear data stream and handling solutions for the IntelliTread technology platform.