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Is Artificial Intelligence the Biggest Threat to Humanity? -- Sentient Machines

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The creators of these films imagine a world where humans have lost control of the technology they developed and must fight for survival of the human species. It could also be suggested the writers and directors of these films are predicting a world where these things happen. After all, many notable figures in the world of tech such as Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and even Stephen Hawking have all made warnings against the potential consequences of AI. But how accurate is the silver screen's depiction and are the fears of my friend based off of these films warranted? Is AI going rogue, building a robot army and attempting to eradicate humans as likely as finding a dead body on top of a lift or being attacked by a giant shark off the Isle of Wight?


Jeanette Winterson: 'The male push is to discard the planet: all the boys are going off into space'

The Guardian

"It was uproar," she says, "We saw cars on fire." Her flat is in the East End district of Spitalfields in a Georgian house, which she bought 25 years ago, complete with a little shop that she ran for years as an organic grocer and tea room until the rates got too high, and she let it out to an upmarket chocolatier. It's as if a scene from Dickens's The Old Curiosity Shop has been dropped into a satire about prosperity Britain: the quaint old shopfront is still intact, while outside it a lifesize sculpture of a rowing boat full of people sits surreally in the middle of the street, and a little further along, a herd of large bronze elephants frolics. These public artworks only arrived a few weeks ago, Winterson explains, as part of a grand plan to pedestrianise the area, and make it more buzzy, just at the moment that the sort of well-heeled office workers who bought upmarket chocolates are abandoning it owing to the Covid pandemic. We're at a transitional moment in so many ways, she says – a perfect moment to launch a book that reassesses the past while staring the future in the face.


USC researchers enable AI to use its "imagination." - USC Viterbi

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The new AI system takes its inspiration from humans: when a human sees a color from one object, we can easily apply it to any other object by substituting the original color with the new one. Now, imagine the same cat, but with coal-black fur. Now, imagine the cat strutting along the Great Wall of China. Doing this, a quick series of neuron activations in your brain will come up with variations of the picture presented, based on your previous knowledge of the world. In other words, as humans, it's easy to envision an object with different attributes.


A deeper look into the impact of new technologies on our work

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But before delving into'behind-the-scenes' of US banking industry meeting ATM, let's turn back time for a second -- on March 27th, 1998, in the New Tech 1998 conference in Denver, Colorado. Here, Neil Postman, a prominent American cultural critic and professor at New York University, gave a keynote lecture. Professor Postman has been a long-time scholar of how new technologies relate to human society, and the book'Amusing Ourselves to Death', a 1985 book that rose to stardom, shows how television technology is destroying public discourse and turning everything into entertainment. I think it has something to do with how we feel about the impact of today's media and how our lives exposed to it are deteriorating. Since this book, Professor Postman has strongly criticized the tendency to respond to all social problems through technical solutions.


Why our fears of job-killing robots are overblown

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The more general point is that computer algorithms will have a devil of a time predicting which jobs are most at risk for being replaced by computers, since they have no comprehension of the skills required to do a particular job successfully. In one study that was widely covered (including by The Washington Post, The Economist, Ars Technica, and The Verge), Oxford University researchers used the U.S. Department of Labor's O NET database, which assesses the importance of various skill competencies for hundreds of occupations. For example, using a scale of 0 to 100, O*NET gauges finger dexterity to be more important for dentists (81) than for locksmiths (72) or barbers (60). The Oxford researchers then coded each of 70 occupations as either automatable or not and correlated these yes/no assessments with O*NET's scores for nine skill categories. Using these statistical correlations, the researchers then estimated the probability of computerization for 702 occupations.


AI strawberries and blockchain chicken: how digital agriculture could rescue global food security

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In May 2020, with technical support from the UN FAO, China Agricultural University and Chinese e-commerce platform Pinduoduo hosted a "smart agriculture competition". Three teams of top strawberry growers – the Traditional teams – and four teams of scientific AI experts – the Technology teams – took part in a strawberry-growing competition in the province of Yunnan, China, billed as an agricultural version of the historical match between a human Go player and Google's DeepMind AI. At the beginning, the Traditional teams were expected to draw best practices from their collective planting and agricultural experience. And they did – for a while. They led in efficient production for a few months before the Technology teams gradually caught up, employing internet-enabled devices (such as intelligent sensors), data analysis and fully digital greenhouse automation.


New technology propels efforts to fight Western wildfires

Boston Herald

As drought- and wind-driven wildfires have become more dangerous across the American West in recent years, firefighters have tried to become smarter in how they prepare. They're using new technology and better positioning of resources in a bid to keep small blazes from erupting into mega-fires like the ones that torched a record 4% of California last year, or the nation's biggest wildfire this year that has charred a section of Oregon half the size of Rhode Island. There have been 730 more wildfires in California so far this year than last, an increase of about 16%. But nearly triple the area has burned -- 470 square miles. Catching fires more quickly gives firefighters a better chance of keeping them small.


Researchers use AI to predict risk of developing type 2 diabetes

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Artificial intelligence could be used to predict who is at risk of developing type 2 diabetes – information that could be used to improve the lives of millions of Canadians. Researchers at the University of Toronto used a machine learning model to analyze health data, collected between 2006 to 2016, of 2.1 million people living in Ontario. They found that they were able to use the model to accurately predict the number of people who would develop type 2 diabetes within a five-year time period. The machine learning model was also able to analyze different factors that would influence whether people were high or low risk to develop the disease. The results of the study were recently published in the journal JAMA Network Open.


Bumble dating app led FBI to Capitol riot suspect: DOJ

FOX News

Fox News congressional correspondent Jacqui Heinrich has the latest from Capitol Hill on'America Reports' The FBI was tipped off to a Texas man arrested Friday for allegedly assaulting police officers during the Capitol riot after messaging with a woman he met on the dating app Bumble in January, the Justice Department announced. Andrew Quentin Taake, 32, was charged with assaulting an officer, obstructing an official proceeding, and other offenses for his actions during the riot, which allegedly included pepper-spraying several officers and assaulting others with a whip-like weapon. The FBI received a tip from a woman he met on the online dating app, Bumble, on Jan. 9. Screenshots of their messages show that Taake sent the woman a selfie that was taken "about 30 minutes after being sprayed," allegedly telling the potential suitor that he was at the riot "from the very beginning." A woman who Andrew Quentin Taake matched with on Bumble tipped off the FBI about his alleged Capitol riot involvement. Taake allegedly flew to Washington, D.C., from Houston the day before the riot and returned home a few days later.


What AI Experts Fear From AI - AI Summary

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Titled "Investing in trustworthy AI," the 82-page report from Deloitte and the Chamber Technology Engagement Center sought to identify the concerns that technology experts have when it comes to the adoption of AI, as well as highlight the impact that government investment in AI can have on the emerging technology. For instance, the survey found that 66% of respondents indicated that "the government could mitigate unwanted biases" and found 69% suggested that "the government could encourage accountability for AI decisions." Two-thirds of survey-takers want the government to reduce the impact of job loss due to AI, while 72% said the government could "mitigate acceleration of social divides between workers with and without AI skills." "Broadly, respondents overwhelmingly supported the notion that government intervention could enhance the benefits of AI and thus contribute to increased AI trustworthiness," the report states. One-quarter of patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office use AI technologies in some shape or form, reports Deloitte, which claims that the economic impact of AI will be somewhere between $447 billion and $1.43 trillion over the next five years.