Goto

Collaborating Authors

air transportation


Is GitHub Copilot worth the cockpit?

#artificialintelligence

One month ago, GitHub announced its latest, shiny product: an artificial intelligence tool developed by GitHub and OpenAI to assist users of Visual Studio Code by autocompleting code, but on the next level. It's a machine learning-powered software that can write code by itself, generating quite impressive programming functions. Here is the catch, there are a lot of dislikes going on for this cute little fellow. And I don't get why so much hate for this, how can you not like something like this in the market, and that too for free. Let's address them one by one So many articles are flooding to criticize, just for the sake of writing something.


Is Artificial Intelligence The New Logistics Technology For Organ Transportation?

#artificialintelligence

Commercial Aviation has great importance in the ... [ ] transport of organs for transplants in receiving patients. Studies show that commercial air carriers carry more than 9,000 organs a year on board airplanes with passengers. In the United States, an estimated 114,000 people were waiting for organ transplants, and only 30% of those got their organs on time in 2019. According to Kaiser Health News and Reveal from the Center of Investigative Reporting, nearly 170 organs could not be transplanted. Almost 370 endured near misses with delays of two hours or more because of transportation problems.


An AI-Controlled Drone Racer Has Beaten Human Pilots For The First Time

#artificialintelligence

Drone racing is an increasingly popular sport with big money prizes for skilled professionals. New control algorithms developed at the University of Zurich (UZH) have beaten experienced human pilots for the first time – but they still have significant limitations. In the past, attempts to develop automated algorithms to beat humans have run into problems with accurately simulating the limitations of the quadcopter and the flight path it takes. Traditional flight paths around a complex drone racing course are calculated using polynomial methods which produce a series of smooth curves, and these are not necessarily as fast as the sharper and more jagged paths flown by human pilots. A team from the Robotics and Perception Group at UZH has developed a trajectory planning algorithm to calculates the optimal route at every point in the flight, rather than doing it section by section.


Russia's Cutting-edge Drone Unveiled at MAKS 2021 - ELE Times

#artificialintelligence

Zala Aero, a Russian UAV manufacturer, presented its state-of-the-art vertical takeoff and landing drone – the ZALA VTOL – at the MAKS 2021 International Aviation and Space Salon, the company told reporters during the air show. "The ZALA VTOL combines the properties of an airplane type drone and a tilt-rotor aircraft. The flight configuration changes depending on the assigned mission. The electric propulsion system enables the aircraft to be in the air for up to 4 hours, providing a range of up to 200 km in aircraft configuration," the company said. The built-in on-board computer ZX1 based on artificial intelligence makes it possible to process Full HD format data and transmit HD videos and photos over encrypted communication links to a ground control station.


New algorithm flies drones faster than human racing pilots

Robohub

To be useful, drones need to be quick. Because of their limited battery life they must complete whatever task they have – searching for survivors on a disaster site, inspecting a building, delivering cargo – in the shortest possible time. And they may have to do it by going through a series of waypoints like windows, rooms, or specific locations to inspect, adopting the best trajectory and the right acceleration or deceleration at each segment. The best human drone pilots are very good at doing this and have so far always outperformed autonomous systems in drone racing. Now, a research group at the University of Zurich (UZH) has created an algorithm that can find the quickest trajectory to guide a quadrotor – a drone with four propellers – through a series of waypoints on a circuit.


New Algorithm Flies Drones Faster than Human Racing Pilots - ELE Times

#artificialintelligence

To be useful, drones need to be quick. Because of their limited battery life, they must complete whatever task they have--searching for survivors on a disaster site, inspecting a building, delivering cargo--in the shortest possible time. And they may have to do it by going through a series of waypoints like windows, rooms, or specific locations to inspect, adopting the best trajectory and the right acceleration or deceleration at each segment. The best human drone pilots are very good at doing this and have so far always outperformed autonomous systems in drone racing. Now, a research group at the University of Zurich (UZH) has created an algorithm that can find the quickest trajectory to guide a quadrotor--a drone with four propellers--through a series of waypoints on a circuit.


How AI translation could unseat English as the lingua franca of the business world

#artificialintelligence

Or in developed nations that are less wealthy than their closest neighbors, like my native Portugal. Because of the country's modest economic size, compared to most of Western Europe, many online companies have limited (or no) presence in Portuguese. British Airways, for instance, only offers customer service in Portuguese on weekdays during business hours--and they're a global airline with enormous operations in Europe. What's more, there are almost 230 million native speakers of Portuguese worldwide, the vast majority of them in Brazil (where, yes, British Airways also offers flights). It's the sixth most spoken language in the world.


Narita and Haneda airports start wider use of facial recognition

The Japan Times

Chiba – Japan's Narita and Haneda airports on Monday started the full-scale use of facial recognition, allowing international travelers to check in baggage and pass security checkpoints without showing passports or flight tickets. With the "Face Express" system aimed at speeding up the boarding process and providing a touchless experience for passengers, travelers need to have their photos taken at check-in when they register their passports and boarding passes upon arriving at the airports. After registering necessary data with special terminals, cameras at baggage check-in, security checkpoint entrances and boarding gates will automatically verify passengers' identity and allow them to pass through, Narita International Airport Corp. said. "The procedure (for boarding) ended quickly and the gate opened smoothly," said company employee Susumu Hayakawa, 29, before traveling on a Japan Airlines flight to Chicago from Narita Airport near Tokyo. The system fully came into service after Narita Airport started trialing the use of facial recognition in April, only involving airport staff and not actual travelers. It will also lead to reduced physical contact between travelers, machines, and airport and flight staff, helping to prevent the spread of virus infections, the airport operator has said.


Practical Explainable AI: Unlocking the black-box and building trustworthy AI systems

#artificialintelligence

Today, companies are using AI in every aspect of their businesses. The adoption of AI has been very influential especially in the finance and healthcare sectors, where the impact of implementing AI solutions is very significant. In the financial services, AI is playing a very important role to optimize processes ranging from credit decisions to quantitative trading to financial risk management. In healthcare, we are seeing a spike in adoption of conversational bots, automated diagnoses and predicting diseases. This increase in adoption is also causing a cultural shift in our relationship with AI.


Renowned Vermont hot air balloon pilot falls to death after getting caught under basket: 'Creative genius'

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A hot air balloon pilot died this week after he became trapped underneath the balloon's basket and fell to his death, the Vermont State Police said. Longtime pilot Brian Boland, 72, had left Post Mills Airport in Vermont with four passengers when the balloon started to descend rapidly and touched down in a field. The basket tipped and one of the passengers fell out but wasn't hurt, police said.