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Artificial Intelligence for Rapid Exclusion of COVID-19 Infection

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An international retrospective study finds that infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, creates subtle electrical changes in the heart. An AI-enhanced EKG can detect these changes and potentially be used as a rapid, reliable COVID-19 screening test to rule out COVID-19 infection. The AI-enhanced EKG was able to detect COVID-19 infection in the test with a positive predictive value -- people infected -- of 37% and a negative predictive value -- people not infected -- of 91%. When additional normal control subjects were added to reflect a 5% prevalence of COVID-19 -- similar to a real-world population -- the negative predictive value jumped to 99.2%. The findings are published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.


Reimagining the Delivery of Health Care to Create Resiliency

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For guidance on how healthcare organizations can leverage connected health technologies to support care anywhere initiatives and create a better experience for healthcare providers and patients, join us for the webinar, Driving Patient-Centric Care: Innovating Drug Development and Care Delivery with Connected Health Technologies, live on July 20 at 11 am EDT. COVID-19 showed how resourceful healthcare and life science organizations could be in the midst of a global pandemic. As the science of how the coronavirus worked and how to contain it evolved, those on the front line had to respond quickly to make course corrections. In many ways, they were fixing the plane while flying it. This was no small feat with so many lives on the line including patients, direct care health providers, first responders, and staff.


18 AI Applications / Usecases / Examples in Healthcare in 2021

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AI, computer vision and machine learning systems proved that machines are better and faster than humans analyzing big data. Today, organizations have large datasets of patient data and insights about diseases through techniques like Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Using AI, healthcare providers can analyze and interpret the available patient data more precisely for early diagnosis and better treatment. Today, it is possible to say whether a person has the chance to get cancer from a selfie using computer vision and machine learning to detect increased bilirubin levels in a person's sclera, the white part of the eye. As the interest in AI in the healthcare industry continues to grow, there are numerous current AI applications, and more use cases will emerge in the future.


Role and Importance of AI in Supply Chain Management

#artificialintelligence

Supply chain management has become a vital strategic opportunity to keep organizations competitive and this statement has taken even more precedence due to the current pandemic situation that the world is facing. The Covid-19 pandemic has resulted in some sort of supply chain disruption related to transportation restrictions created by the lockdown and the economic impact caused by it will be felt for months to come. But at the same time, there has been a sudden increase in the adoption of digital technologies like algorithm development, data analytics, artificial intelligence, machine learning, the internet of things, and cloud computing to make supply chain management ever-evolving. Artificial Intelligence with the help of automated technology processes a large amount of data within few minutes to provide business-based insightful information. AI is already beginning to change the face of the supply chain industry.


Council Post: Human Cognitive Bias And Its Role In AI

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Daniel Fallmann is Founder and CEO of Mindbreeze, a leader in enterprise search, applied artificial intelligence and knowledge management. When faced with a challenge, human beings are generally quick to first try to develop creative solutions. We tend to pick the most logical explanation we can find, ignoring all contradictory or unprovable hypotheses in the process. However, this irrational pattern of thinking could eventually sabotage our efforts to create an actual intelligent machine. A cognitive bias known as rationalization is one such phenomenon that is tricky or even dangerous for AI.


Physician researcher artificial intelligence in paediatric cardiology

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The department of paediatric cardiology at the Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG), one of the 4 licensed centres for the treatment of congenital heart diseases in The Netherlands, is an international centre of expertise on pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure in children. The department is the national referral centre for children with pulmonary (arterial) hypertension. All Dutch children suspected to have pulmonary hypertension are referred to our centre for confirmation of diagnosis, initiation of therapy and standardized follow-up visits, in close collaboration with our network centres. Our department conducts leading clinical, fundamental, and translational research in the field of pulmonary hypertension and congenital heart disease, such as tetralogy of Fallot, Fontan circulation and right heart failure. Our clinical research focuses on the improvement of diagnostic and imaging techniques, treatment strategies and survival of these patient groups.


How to mitigate bias in AI

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As the common proverb goes, to err is human. One day, machines may offer workforce solutions that are free from human decision-making mistakes; however, those machines learn through algorithms and systems built by programmers, developers, product managers, and software teams with inherent biases (like all other humans). In other words, to err is also machine. Artificial intelligence has the potential to improve our lives in countless ways. However, since algorithms often are created by a few people and distributed to many, it's incumbent upon the creators to build them in a way that benefits populations and communities equitably.


Why aren't patients being told truth about electric shock therapy?

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Jacqui Quibbell has suffered from'crippling periods of depression and suicidal thoughts' for all her adult life. In 2003, her doctors suggested Jacqui underwent electro-convulsive therapy (ECT). This involves attaching electrodes to the patient's head and, under general anaesthetic, passing electric shocks through their brain -- which is said to'rewire' it. 'I didn't know much about ECT, I didn't have Google then,' says Jacqui, 57. 'I started suffering memory loss during the treatment and by the time it finished, my short-term memory had disappeared completely and has never come back.


This High Schooler Created a Drug Discovery Search Engine

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Between his mom's place in Manhattan, his dad in Queens, and his high school in the Bronx, Noah Getz is on the subway a lot. It gives him time to read and to think. Our first coronavirus summer was waning, and he'd been wrestling with a weighty science problem: using machine learning to hunt down tiny molecules that may help treat Alzheimer's. Thus far, his AI had been spitting out results that were "almost comically bad." The problem was that the algorithms Getz was using did their best when they had massive amounts of data to sift through and discover patterns in. Getz' data set was far smaller; he was working with one lab at Mount Sinai, not a multinational pharmaceutical company with a galaxy-sized drug library.


Google announces health tool to identify skin conditions

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Google's latest foray into health care is a web tool that uses artificial intelligence to help people identify skin, hair, or nail conditions. The company previewed the tool at I/O today, and it says it hopes to launch a pilot later this year. People can use their phone's camera to take three pictures of the problem area -- for example, a rash on their arm. The tool then gives a list of possible conditions from a set of 288 that it's trained to recognize. It's not intended to diagnose the problem, the company said in a blog post.