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Deep Learning


Automated screening of sickle cells using a smartphone-based microscope and deep learning

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Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a major public health priority throughout much of the world, affecting millions of people. In many regions, particularly those in resource-limited settings, SCD is not consistently diagnosed. In Africa, where the majority of SCD patients reside, more than 50% of the 0.2–0.3 million children born with SCD each year will die from it; many of these deaths are in fact preventable with correct diagnosis and treatment. Here, we present a deep learning framework which can perform automatic screening of sickle cells in blood smears using a smartphone microscope. This framework uses two distinct, complementary deep neural networks.


Beginner's Guide to Deep Learning Concepts

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Learning through experience, memorizing the things learnt are the skills which is taken care by our brain… So does anyone thought whether a machine can think like us, learn like us? Yes, Machines can think like us and more ever can think more than a human, learn like us by using some algorithms. This phenomenon is called "Machine Learning". Deep Learning is the subset of Machine Learning and Machine Learning is the subset of AI. Basically Deep Learning can be known as the improvement to Machine Learning.


5 Deep Learning Challenges To Watch Out For

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Deep learning is gaining prominence in the field of artificial intelligence, streamlining processes, and bringing huge financial gains to businesses. However, businesses must be aware of deep learning challenges before they employ deep learning to solve their problems. From your Google voice assistant to your'Netflix and chill' recommendations to the very humble Grammarly -- they're all powered by deep learning. Deep learning has become one of the primary research areas in artificial intelligence. Most of the well-known applications of artificial intelligence, such as image processing, speech recognition and translations, and object identification are carried out by deep learning.


Stanford CS224N: NLP with Deep Learning Winter 2019 Lecture 1 – Introduction and Word Vectors

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Take an adapted version of this course as part of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Professional Program. Professor Christopher Manning Thomas M. Siebel Professor in Machine Learning, Professor of Linguistics and of Computer Science Director, Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (SAIL) To follow along with the course schedule and syllabus, visit: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cs224n/... To get the latest news on Stanford's upcoming professional programs in Artificial Intelligence, visit: http://learn.stanford.edu/AI.html To view all online courses and programs offered by Stanford, visit: http://online.stanford.edu


Lecture 8: Recurrent Neural Networks and Language Models

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Lecture 8 covers traditional language models, RNNs, and RNN language models. Also reviewed are important training problems and tricks, RNNs for other sequence tasks, and bidirectional and deep RNNs. This lecture series provides a thorough introduction to the cutting-edge research in deep learning applied to NLP, an approach that has recently obtained very high performance across many different NLP tasks including question answering and machine translation. It emphasizes how to implement, train, debug, visualize, and design neural network models, covering the main technologies of word vectors, feed-forward models, recurrent neural networks, recursive neural networks, convolutional neural networks, and recent models involving a memory component. For additional learning opportunities please visit: http://stanfordonline.stanford.edu/


Nomics Machine-Learning Tool Offers 7-Day Price Forecast on Top 100 Cryptos

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Data provider Nomics is using machine learning to predict the future prices of cryptocurrencies like bitcoin. Launched Thursday, the 7-Day Asset Price Prediction feed will give an outlook on future crypto prices based on purpose-built algorithms and the firm's API, Nomics CEO Clay Collins told CoinDesk in an interview. "There are a lot of poor signals out there that are getting a lot of clicks and we thought we could do a net positive for the space by just leveling up the quality of predictions," Collins said. The Nomics forecaster isn't a standalone, investment-grade product, Collins added, but can help inform crypto investors based on curated exchange data. The free tool currently lists 100 of the top cryptocurrencies by market cap.


What is computer vision?

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If I asked you to name the objects in the picture below, you would probably come up with a list of words such as "tablecloth, basket, grass, boy, girl, man, woman, orange juice bottle, tomatoes, lettuce, disposable plates…" without thinking twice. Now, if I told you to describe the picture below, you would probably say, "It's the picture of a family picnic" again without giving it a second thought. Those are two very easy tasks that any person with below-average intelligence and above the age of six or seven could accomplish. However, in the background, a very complicated process takes place. The human vision is a very intricate piece of organic technology that involves our eyes and visual cortex, but also takes into account our mental models of objects, our abstract understanding of concepts and our personal experiences through billions and trillions of interactions we've made with the world in our lives.


This free AI chatbot helps businesses fight COVID-19 misinformation

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Avaamo, a company that specializes in conversational AI, recently built a virtual assistant to translate natural language queries about the COVID-19 pandemic into reliable insights. In other words, it's an AI-powered chatbot that can answer just about any question you have about the pandemic. Avaamo's Project COVID uses a deep learning system called natural language processing to turn our questions about the pandemic into website and database queries. It works a lot like Google or Bing, you input text and the AI tries to find the most relevant information possible. The big difference is that Avaamo carefully guards the gates against misinformation by only surfacing results from reputable websites such as CDC, NIH, WHO, and Johns Hopkins.


Seeing Through Walls

Communications of the ACM

Machine vision coupled with artificial intelligence (AI) has made great strides toward letting computers understand images. Thanks to deep learning, which processes information in a way analogous to the human brain, machine vision is doing everything from keeping self-driving cars on the right track to improving cancer diagnosis by examining biopsy slides or x-ray images. Now some researchers are going beyond what the human eye or a camera lens can see, using machine learning to watch what people are doing on the other side of a wall. The technique relies on low-power radio frequency (RF) signals, which reflect off living tissue and metal but pass easily through wooden or plaster interior walls. AI can decipher those signals, not only to detect the presence of people, but also to see how they are moving, and even to predict the activity they are engaged in, from talking on a phone to brushing their teeth.


Leveraging Unlabeled Data

Communications of the ACM

Despite the rapid advances it has made it over the past decade, deep learning presents many industrial users with problems when they try to implement the technology, issues that the Internet giants have worked around through brute force. "The challenge that today's systems face is the amount of data they need for training," says Tim Ensor, head of artificial intelligence (AI) at U.K.-based technology company Cambridge Consultants. "On top of that, it needs to be structured data." Most of the commercial applications and algorithm benchmarks used to test deep neural networks (DNNs) consume copious quantities of labeled data; for example, images or pieces of text that have already been tagged in some way by a human to indicate what the sample represents. The Internet giants, who have collected the most data for use in training deep learning systems, have often resorted to crowdsourcing measures such as asking people to prove they are human during logins by identifying objects in a collection of images, or simply buying manual labor through services such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk.