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We are all already addicted to AI

#artificialintelligence

I have been on a 30-day challenge to improve my knowledge of Artificial Intelligence (AI), to understand how it works and how it impacts our lives, and this section talks about how not only have we already integrated it in our everyday lives, but in some cases already love it and depend on it. In this fifth section, we tackle "AI in Application." Exploring where AI is prevalent and the data that is being collected already is not surprising but it is humbling how much it has already penetrated our lives and how much we depend on it. Recently, a friend of mine named her baby Sirius. For those that love the Harry Potter books, the immediate connection is to Sirius Black, so of course being a Harry Potter fan I instantly loved it.


Pranab Ghosh posted on LinkedIn

#artificialintelligence

We see news about machine learning everywhere. Indeed, there is lot of potential in machine learning. According to Gartner's predictions, "Through 2020, 80% of AI projects will remain alchemy, run by wizards whose talents will not scale in the organization" and Transform 2019 of VentureBeat predicted that 87% of AI projects will never make it into production. Why do so many projects fail?


How to use Triller, in case TikTok actually gets banned

Mashable

TikTok may be the app-du-jour, but its presence in the United States may not last. Enter Triller, the video sharing platform emerging as the alternative to TikTok amid uncertainty over the app's future. Popular stars like Charli D'Amelio, the most followed person on TikTok, are starting their own accounts on Triller. D'Amelio is still posting on TikTok as usual, however. Triller, which began as a niche music discovery app because of its "AI-powered" editing features, has been around since 2015.


The clearest, fastest way manufacturers can capitalize on data analytics

#artificialintelligence

Of all the new capabilities that manufacturers can gain by adopting Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) technology, data analytics can be among the most powerful--and the most challenging. Manufacturers make things and, as such, they're accustomed to working with materials and machines, not bits and bytes. Though it's true that many have experience working with data from ERP systems and MES, few have the internal resources, skills and knowledge to capitalize on the high-volume data streams of IIoT analytics. Compounding the challenge is a talent shortage. Pure-play data companies such as Google, Amazon and Facebook are more likely to appeal to the best and brightest.


Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have your data. Why not China-owned ByteDance's TikTok?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have your data. The Trump administration said Friday that it would bar two popular Chinese-owned mobile apps WeChat and TikTok from U.S. app stores as of midnight Sunday, escalating the U.S. standoff with China. "Today's actions prove once again that President Trump will do everything in his power to guarantee our national security and protect Americans from the threats of the Chinese Communist Party," Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement. The Trump administration contends the data collected from American users by TikTok and WeChat could be accessed by the Chinese government. "The Trump administration is looking to make sure U.S. TikTok consumer data stays out of Beijing," said Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives.


Tinder + AI: A Perfect Matchmaking?

#artificialintelligence

Tinder is a mobile dating app that can help you find singles in the local area. "Swipe right if you like her, Swipe left if you don't" is a linchpin to the company's success, and the format has been duplicated by numerous contemporaries. Tinder was first launched as a location-based dating app in 2012 within incubator Hatch Labs and join a venture between IAC and Xtreme Labs and now it's one of the most popular dating apps in the US with about 1.7 Billion swipes per day. Tinder has employed the freemium business model to earn revenue. It went from a "location-based" dating app to a global dating app that is present in 190 countries in less than 8 years.


Yousefi to develop artificial intelligence to improve glaucoma research, diagnosis

#artificialintelligence

IMAGE: Siamak Yousefi, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and the Department of Genetics, Genomics, and Informatics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received two... view more He was awarded $180,000 from the Bright Focus Foundation to study the impact of glaucoma on certain retinal ganglion cells, as a path to uncover more information on glaucoma progression. The foundation is a nonprofit organization supporting research on brain and eye diseases. "Glaucoma affects over 90 million people worldwide and its incidence is predicted to double over the next two decades," Dr. Yousefi said. "The costs of treatment of glaucoma increase sharply for later stages of the disease. Therefore, earlier detection of glaucoma and its progression could result not only in retaining vision, but also in significant financial savings. Effective monitoring and determining appropriate treatment strategies require reliable approaches that quantify disease-induced changes more accurately."


Mozilla wants to understand your weird YouTube recommendations

ZDNet

From cute cat videos to sourdough bread recipes: sometimes, it feels like the algorithm behind YouTube's "Up Next" section knows the user better than the user knows themselves. Often, that same algorithm leads the viewer down a rabbit hole. How many times have you spent countless hours clicking through the next suggested video, each time promising yourself that this one would be the last one? The scenario gets thorny when the system somehow steers the user towards conspiracy theory videos and other forms of extreme content, as some have complained. To get an idea of how often this happens and how, the non-profit Mozilla Foundation has launched a new browser extension that lets users take action when they are recommended videos on YouTube that they then wish they hadn't ended up watching.


Future of AI Part 2

#artificialintelligence

This part of the series looks at the future of AI with much of the focus in the period after 2025. The leading AI researcher, Geoff Hinton, stated that it is very hard to predict what advances AI will bring beyond five years, noting that exponential progress makes the uncertainty too great. This article will therefore consider both the opportunities as well as the challenges that we will face along the way across different sectors of the economy. It is not intended to be exhaustive. AI deals with the area of developing computing systems which are capable of performing tasks that humans are very good at, for example recognising objects, recognising and making sense of speech, and decision making in a constrained environment. Some of the classical approaches to AI include (non-exhaustive list) Search algorithms such as Breath-First, Depth-First, Iterative Deepening Search, A* algorithm, and the field of Logic including Predicate Calculus and Propositional Calculus. Local Search approaches were also developed for example Simulated Annealing, Hill Climbing (see also Greedy), Beam Search and Genetic Algorithms (see below). Machine Learning is defined as the field of AI that applies statistical methods to enable computer systems to learn from the data towards an end goal. The term was introduced by Arthur Samuel in 1959. A non-exhaustive list of examples of techniques include Linear Regression, Logistic Regression, K-Means, k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN), Naive Bayes, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Decision Trees, Random Forests, XG Boost, Light Gradient Boosting Machine (LightGBM), CatBoost. Deep Learning refers to the field of Neural Networks with several hidden layers. Such a neural network is often referred to as a deep neural network. Neural Networks are biologically inspired networks that extract abstract features from the data in a hierarchical fashion.


Pet dating site 'Pinder' helps animals find love, friendship

FOX News

Pets need companions too, and now there's a website to help them. Pinder, a pet website styled after human dating app Tinder, allows owners to find pals for their pets, the New York Post reported. "We're just taking the effective format of Tinder and applying it to the pet community," Kevin Botero, the founder of Pinder, told the Post. The website shows only pet profiles – the profile setup page says "no humans allowed" – and currently all pets have to be in costume for the website's Halloween costume contest. According to the Post, the contest is a way to kick off the website's launch.