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Facebook AI Chief Pushes the Technology's Limits

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

As babies drop spoons and cups from their high-chairs, they come to understand the concept of gravity. To a parent, it might seem like the process takes forever, but babies typically grasp the idea in a few months. Algorithms require much more data and time to learn much narrower lessons. A handful of scientists are pushing the furthest limits of artificial intelligence by training it to better learn by itself, more like a baby. "This is the single most important problem to solve in AI today," says Yann LeCun, chief artificial intelligence scientist at Facebook Inc.


Artificial intelligence is a totalitarian's dream – here's how to take power back

#artificialintelligence

Individualistic western societies are built on the idea that no one knows our thoughts, desires or joys better than we do. And so we put ourselves, rather than the government, in charge of our lives. We tend to agree with the philosopher Immanuel Kant's claim that no one has the right to force their idea of the good life on us. Artificial intelligence (AI) will change this. It will know us better than we know ourselves.


These Hoodies Make You 'Invisible' to Some Surveillance Algorithms

#artificialintelligence

The spread of artificial intelligence into surveillance technology has given every CCTV camera the potential to turn into a spy for the state. And on the internet, images scraped from social media sites or videos can be used to build massive surveillance databases like Clearview AI. A hoodie might change that. Researchers from Facebook and the University of Maryland have made a series of sweatshirts and T-shirts that trick surveillance algorithms into not detecting the wearer. The shirts exploit a quirk that was found in computer vision algorithms nearly five years ago.


Facebook's AI team is teaching robots what human trait? – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Right now, a robot that has to navigate around a home, like a robotic vacuum, knows what a refrigerator is when it sees one, but unlike a human, it doesn't necessarily know that that means it's in the kitchen. Therefore, if a piece of furniture gets moved, it can disorient the robot unless one takes the time to manually program it with the object's new location. A team of researchers from Facebook's AI program and Carnegie Mellon University are teaming up to change that. Using a system dubbed Goal-Oriented Semantic Exploration, the team is using machine learning to teach robots a little bit of common sense when it comes to the placement of household furniture. Looking for the latest gov tech news as it happens?


In China, facial recognition, public shaming and control go hand in hand

#artificialintelligence

A screen shows a demonstration of SenseTime Group's SenseVideo pedestrian and vehicle recognition system at the company's showroom in Beijing. Facial recognition supporters in the US often argue that the surveillance technology is reserved for the greatest risks -- to help deal with violent crimes, terrorist threats and human trafficking. And while it's still often used for petty crimes like shoplifting, stealing $12 worth of goods or selling $50 worth of drugs, its use in the US still looks tame compared with how widely deployed facial recognition has been in China. A database leak in 2019 gave a glimpse of how pervasive China's surveillance tools are -- with more than 6.8 million records from a single day, taken from cameras positioned around hotels, parks, tourism spots and mosques, logging details on people as young as 9 days old. The Chinese government is accused of using facial recognition to commit atrocities against Uyghur Muslims, relying on the technology to carry out "the largest mass incarceration of a minority population in the world today."


How Facebook uses AI to manipulate you

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is right up there with robots taking over our jobs. This is the first in a series on how big tech like Facebook uses AI to manipulate you. The number of AI applications has increased rapidly. We speculate and marvel about what AIs will be able to do in the future. But what we don't realise is that AI has already had a huge impact on the goods and services we use every day.


AI named after V For Vendetta masks protects photos from being gathered by facial recognition apps

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Clearview AI is just one of many facial recognition firms scraping billions of online images to create a massive database for purchase – but a new program could block their efforts. Researchers designed an image clocking tool that makes subtle pixel-level changes that distort pictures enough so they cannot be used by online scrapers – and claims it is 100 percent effective. Named in honor of the'V for Vendetta' mask, Fawkes is an algorithm and software combination that'cloaks' an image to trick systems, which is like adding an invisible mask to your face. These altered pictures teach technologies a distorted version of the subject and when presented with an'uncloaked' form, the scraping app fails to recognize the individual. 'It might surprise some to learn that we started the Fawkes project a while before the New York Times article that profiled Clearview.ai in February 2020,' researchers from the SANLab at University of Chicago shared in a statement.


Class action comedy: Is Microsoft stealing its business customers' data? (Uh, no)

ZDNet

Last week three individuals filed a lawsuit against Microsoft Corporation in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, with a request for class action certification. Microsoft's multitude of Business and Enterprise editions offer more advanced feature sets than the Home and Personal editions, with collaborative applications and management tools designed for meeting enterprise security and compliance challenges. The plaintiffs contend that Microsoft is routinely violating the privacy of customers who pay for business subscriptions to Microsoft 365 (formerly Office 365). They allege that "Microsoft shares its business customers' data with Facebook and other third parties, without its business customers' consent." The complaint also accuses Microsoft of sharing business customers' data with third-party developers and with "hundreds of subcontractors ... without requiring the subcontractors to keep the data private and secure." And they maintain that Microsoft uses their business customers' private data "to develop and sell new products and services--and otherwise benefit itself."


Cloak your photos with this AI privacy tool to fool facial recognition

#artificialintelligence

Ubiquitous facial recognition is a serious threat to privacy. The idea that the photos we share are being collected by companies to train algorithms that are sold commercially is worrying. Anyone can buy these tools, snap a photo of a stranger, and find out who they are in seconds. But researchers have come up with a clever way to help combat this problem. The solution is a tool named Fawkes, and was created by scientists at the University of Chicago's Sand Lab.


Recommender Systems and Deep Learning in Python

#artificialintelligence

Recommender Systems and Deep Learning in Python 4.6 (1,635 ratings) Course Ratings are calculated from individual students' ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately. What do I mean by "recommender systems", and why are they useful? Let's look at the top 3 websites on the Internet, according to Alexa: Google, YouTube, and Facebook. Recommender systems form the very foundation of these technologies. They are why Google is the most successful technology company today.