AI is 'better than doctors' at predicting when patients are going to die - by analysing heart tests

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Dr Fornwalt added: 'That finding suggests that the model is seeing things that humans probably can't see, or at least that we just ignore and think are normal. 'AI can potentially teach us things that we've been maybe misinterpreting for decades.' Introduction of AI in such situations could see the rise of the superhuman doctor - however it is not known what rhythms the AI has detected, which makes the unexplained diagnosis a little unethical in some doctors opinions. The findings will be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions in Dallas, U.S, on November 16 - with researchers hopeful that they will be able to prove its significance with clinical trial. AI systems rely on artificial neural networks (ANNs), which try to simulate the way the brain works in order to learn. ANNs can be trained to recognise patterns in information - including speech, text data, or visual images - and are the basis for a large number of the developments in AI over recent years. Conventional AI uses input to'teach' an algorithm about a particular subject by feeding it massive amounts of information. AI systems rely on artificial neural networks (ANNs), which try to simulate the way the brain works in order to learn.


Black Friday UK 2019: Amazon is starting Black Friday a week early

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Black Friday fever is almost upon us, and this year online retailer Amazon is rolling out the deals a whole week early in what will be its'biggest ever' event. That means you can get your hands on fantastic offers on toys, beauty, home and more over an extended eight-day period in the UK. During Black Friday last year, customers purchased over two million items on Amazon. Popular buys included the much-loved Amazon Beauty Advent Calendar, the Amazon Echo Dot smart speaker and the highly-rated Instant Pot Pressure Cooker - showing the huge range of fantastic deals available on the day. This year, the sales extravaganza is expected to feature Lightning Deals, limited-time offers, new exclusive-to-Amazon product launches and other big savings.


Deepfake video of Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn endorsing each other for Prime Minister released

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Two eerily realistic videos featuring Boris Johnson and rival Jeremy Corbyn endorsing each other for the role of prime minister have been released by a thinktank to highlight the spread of deepfake technology. Future Advocacy released the bizarre videos in a stunt to raise awareness on the dangers surrounding online disinformation. This is the first time deepfakes of political candidates have been released during a live election in the UK. In the election-style address a character resembling Boris Johnson says: 'Hi folks, I am here with a very special message. 'Since that momentous day in 2016, division has coursed through our country as we argue with fantastic passion, vim and vigour about Brexit.


Step-by-Step Signal Processing with Machine Learning: PCA, ICA, NMF

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Signal processing is crucial in many data science tasks. As soon as we start handling audio files, images or even biological measurements, it is useful to know techniques to process such data. In this article, I will introduce three algorithms you can use for two use cases: Principal Components Analysis (PCA) for dimensionality reduction and feature extraction, Independent Components Analysis (ICA) and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) for source separation. All three methods have ready-to-use implementations on scikit-learn which are useful for your projects, but for the purpose of this article I will show how you can implement these methods from scratch, using only OpenCV to open and save images, and NumPy to handle matrices. I will provide code snippets throughout the article, and you can find the full code as well as the example datasets on Github.


Business must change for the AI era

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The chief executive of technology giant IBM has urged Australian business leaders to plan for dramatic changes to their organisations and the workforce caused by artificial intelligence and advances in quantum computing. Ginni Rometty, who has run the $US120 billion company since 2012 and is in Australia to sign an AI deal with Woodside Petroleum and attend other customer meetings, said business leaders must change their approach to hiring or risk being left behind. Ms Rometty gave a keynote address at a cloud computing conference in Sydney on Tuesday, alongside Woodside chief executive Peter Coleman who told the event he expects AI technology to slice maintenance costs in its plants by 30 per cent a year - or around $300 million. Mr Coleman said this is one of several applications being developed with IBM that also include automating production and improving cybersecurity. Westpac Banking Corp chief executive Brian Hartzer also spoke at the event.


The business of AI up to half off

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Zero to AI teaches business leaders, entrepreneurs, and decision makers how to improve business outcomes with AI. Through a variety of real case studies, the authors discuss the best plan of attack, the necessary resources, the possible risk factors, and the likely benefits of the specific AI application. When you're done, you'll have a roadmap for bringing AI to your own organization!


In healthcare, Q3 funding points to dramatic disruption - ROBO Global

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It's no secret that I'm incredibly bullish about the current trajectory of the healthcare sector when it comes to all things AI and digital. The ROBO Global Healthcare Technology & Innovation Index (HTEC) was launched in April 2019 to give investors a way to target their exposure directly toward this inevitable growth, and since that time, the strength of the sector has proven to be nothing less than spectacular. Last week, CB Insights delivered its 3Q19 VC funding report, and my bullishness is now officially on fire. If that sounds overly dramatic, just look at the 3Q19 numbers, all according to CB Insights, which demonstrate the huge impact of AI and digital technologies on the healthcare sector. These numbers tell two stories.


AI and Clinical Trials

#artificialintelligence

In the United States outcomes-based contracting (OBC) has long been proposed as a measure to reward innovation, based on actual performance of treatments and interventions in patient populations. However, the perceived and actual challenges in implementation have prevented many innovative contracts from leaving the drafting table. Recently, the potential use of artificial intelligence (AI) to predict suitable outcomes for patients to mitigate potential challenges has been discussed.


#4IR_2019-07-27_14-14-38.xlsx

#artificialintelligence

The graph represents a network of 4,182 Twitter users whose recent tweets contained "#4IR", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets, taken from a data set limited to a maximum of 18,000 tweets. The network was obtained from Twitter on Saturday, 27 July 2019 at 21:52 UTC. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 9-day, 8-hour, 38-minute period from Thursday, 18 July 2019 at 12:24 UTC to Saturday, 27 July 2019 at 21:03 UTC. Additional tweets that were mentioned in this data set were also collected from prior time periods. These tweets may expand the complete time period of the data.


This AI knows when you'll die and its creators don't know how

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Researchers from Pennsylvania healthcare provider Geisinger have trained an AI to predict which patients are at a higher risk of dying within the next year, New Scientist reports. They fed the AI 1.77 million electrocardiogram (ECG) logs -- measured in voltage over time -- from 400,000 patients, in order to detect patterns that could indicate future cardiac problems including heart attacks and atrial fibrillation. The results were impressive and a little scary. The AI model performed better than existing methods, according to the researchers, at distinguishing between patients who would die within a year and those who survived. "No matter what, the voltage-based model was always better than any model you could build out of things that we already measure from an ECG," Brandon Fornwalt, lead researcher of the study at Geisinger, told New Scientist.