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Collaborating Authors

Vandergheynst, Pierre


Convolutional Neural Networks on Graphs with Fast Localized Spectral Filtering

Neural Information Processing Systems

In this work, we are interested in generalizing convolutional neural networks (CNNs) from low-dimensional regular grids, where image, video and speech are represented, to high-dimensional irregular domains, such as social networks, brain connectomes or words' embedding, represented by graphs. We present a formulation of CNNs in the context of spectral graph theory, which provides the necessary mathematical background and efficient numerical schemes to design fast localized convolutional filters on graphs. Importantly, the proposed technique offers the same linear computational complexity and constant learning complexity as classical CNNs, while being universal to any graph structure. Experiments on MNIST and 20NEWS demonstrate the ability of this novel deep learning system to learn local, stationary, and compositional features on graphs. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


Some limitations of norm based generalization bounds in deep neural networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Deep convolutional neural networks have been shown to be able to fit a labeling over random data while still being able to generalize well on normal datasets. Describing deep convolutional neural network capacity through the measure of spectral complexity has been recently proposed to tackle this apparent paradox. Spectral complexity correlates with GE and can distinguish networks trained on normal and random labels. We propose the first GE bound based on spectral complexity for deep convolutional neural networks and provide tighter bounds by orders of magnitude from the previous estimate. We then investigate theoretically and empirically the insensitivity of spectral complexity to invariances of modern deep convolutional neural networks, and show several limitations of spectral complexity that occur as a result.


Revisiting hard thresholding for DNN pruning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The most common method for DNN pruning is hard thresholding of network weights, followed by retraining to recover any lost accuracy. Recently developed smart pruning algorithms use the DNN response over the training set for a variety of cost functions to determine redundant network weights, leading to less accuracy degradation and possibly less retraining time. For experiments on the total pruning time (pruning time + retraining time) we show that hard thresholding followed by retraining remains the most efficient way of reducing the number of network parameters. However smart pruning algorithms still have advantages when retraining is not possible. In this context we propose a novel smart pruning algorithm based on difference of convex functions optimisation and show that it is often orders of magnitude faster than competing approaches while achieving the lowest classification accuracy degradation. Furthermore we investigate theoretically the effect of hard thresholding on DNN accuracy. We show that accuracy degradation increases with remaining network depth from the pruned layer. We also discover a link between the latent dimensionality of the training data manifold and network robustness to hard thresholding.


FeTa: A DCA Pruning Algorithm with Generalization Error Guarantees

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recent DNN pruning algorithms have succeeded in reducing the number of parameters in fully connected layers, often with little or no drop in classification accuracy. However, most of the existing pruning schemes either have to be applied during training or require a costly retraining procedure after pruning to regain classification accuracy. We start by proposing a cheap pruning algorithm for fully connected DNN layers based on difference of convex functions (DC) optimisation, that requires little or no retraining. We then provide a theoretical analysis for the growth in the Generalization Error (GE) of a DNN for the case of bounded perturbations to the hidden layers, of which weight pruning is a special case. Our pruning method is orders of magnitude faster than competing approaches, while our theoretical analysis sheds light to previously observed problems in DNN pruning. Experiments on commnon feedforward neural networks validate our results.


Spectrally approximating large graphs with smaller graphs

arXiv.org Machine Learning

How does coarsening affect the spectrum of a general graph? We provide conditions such that the principal eigenvalues and eigenspaces of a coarsened and original graph Laplacian matrices are close. The achieved approximation is shown to depend on standard graph-theoretic properties, such as the degree and eigenvalue distributions, as well as on the ratio between the coarsened and actual graph sizes. Our results carry implications for learning methods that utilize coarsening. For the particular case of spectral clustering, they imply that coarse eigenvectors can be used to derive good quality assignments even without refinement---this phenomenon was previously observed, but lacked formal justification.


PAC-Bayesian Margin Bounds for Convolutional Neural Networks - Technical Report

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recently the generalisation error of deep neural networks has been analysed through the PAC-Bayesian framework, for the case of fully connected layers. We adapt this approach to the convolutional setting.


Fast Approximate Spectral Clustering for Dynamic Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Spectral clustering is a widely studied problem, yet its complexity is prohibitive for dynamic graphs of even modest size. We claim that it is possible to reuse information of past cluster assignments to expedite computation. Our approach builds on a recent idea of sidestepping the main bottleneck of spectral clustering, i.e., computing the graph eigenvectors, by using fast Chebyshev graph filtering of random signals. We show that the proposed algorithm achieves clustering assignments with quality approximating that of spectral clustering and that it can yield significant complexity benefits when the graph dynamics are appropriately bounded.


Stationary signal processing on graphs

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Graphs are a central tool in machine learning and information processing as they allow to conveniently capture the structure of complex datasets. In this context, it is of high importance to develop flexible models of signals defined over graphs or networks. In this paper, we generalize the traditional concept of wide sense stationarity to signals defined over the vertices of arbitrary weighted undirected graphs. We show that stationarity is expressed through the graph localization operator reminiscent of translation. We prove that stationary graph signals are characterized by a well-defined Power Spectral Density that can be efficiently estimated even for large graphs. We leverage this new concept to derive Wiener-type estimation procedures of noisy and partially observed signals and illustrate the performance of this new model for denoising and regression.


Compressive Embedding and Visualization using Graphs

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Visualizing high-dimensional data has been a focus in data analysis communities for decades, which has led to the design of many algorithms, some of which are now considered references (such as t-SNE for example). In our era of overwhelming data volumes, the scalability of such methods have become more and more important. In this work, we present a method which allows to apply any visualization or embedding algorithm on very large datasets by considering only a fraction of the data as input and then extending the information to all data points using a graph encoding its global similarity. We show that in most cases, using only $\mathcal{O}(\log(N))$ samples is sufficient to diffuse the information to all $N$ data points. In addition, we propose quantitative methods to measure the quality of embeddings and demonstrate the validity of our technique on both synthetic and real-world datasets.


Convolutional Neural Networks on Graphs with Fast Localized Spectral Filtering

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In this work, we are interested in generalizing convolutional neural networks (CNNs) from low-dimensional regular grids, where image, video and speech are represented, to high-dimensional irregular domains, such as social networks, brain connectomes or words' embedding, represented by graphs. We present a formulation of CNNs in the context of spectral graph theory, which provides the necessary mathematical background and efficient numerical schemes to design fast localized convolutional filters on graphs. Importantly, the proposed technique offers the same linear computational complexity and constant learning complexity as classical CNNs, while being universal to any graph structure. Experiments on MNIST and 20NEWS demonstrate the ability of this novel deep learning system to learn local, stationary, and compositional features on graphs.