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Collaborating Authors

Jaggi, Martin


Data Parallelism in Training Sparse Neural Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Network pruning is an effective methodology to compress large neural networks, and sparse neural networks obtained by pruning can benefit from their reduced memory and computational costs at use. Notably, recent advances have found that it is possible to find a trainable sparse neural network even at random initialization prior to training; hence the obtained sparse network only needs to be trained. While this approach of pruning at initialization turned out to be highly effective, little has been studied about the training aspects of these sparse neural networks. In this work, we focus on measuring the effects of data parallelism on training sparse neural networks. As a result, we find that the data parallelism in training sparse neural networks is no worse than that in training densely parameterized neural networks, despite the general difficulty of training sparse neural networks. When training sparse networks using SGD with momentum, the breakdown of the perfect scaling regime occurs even much later than the dense at large batch sizes.


A Unified Theory of Decentralized SGD with Changing Topology and Local Updates

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Decentralized stochastic optimization methods have gained a lot of attention recently, mainly because of their cheap per iteration cost, data locality, and their communication-efficiency. In this paper we introduce a unified convergence analysis that covers a large variety of decentralized SGD methods which so far have required different intuitions, have different applications, and which have been developed separately in various communities. Our algorithmic framework covers local SGD updates and synchronous and pairwise gossip updates on adaptive network topology. We derive universal convergence rates for smooth (convex and non-convex) problems and the rates interpolate between the heterogeneous (non-identically distributed data) and iid-data settings, recovering linear convergence rates in many special cases, for instance for over-parametrized models. Our proofs rely on weak assumptions (typically improving over prior work in several aspects) and recover (and improve) the best known complexity results for a host of important scenarios, such as for instance coorperative SGD and federated averaging (local SGD).


PowerSGD: Practical Low-Rank Gradient Compression for Distributed Optimization

Neural Information Processing Systems

We study gradient compression methods to alleviate the communication bottleneck in data-parallel distributed optimization. Despite the significant attention received, current compression schemes either do not scale well, or fail to achieve the target test accuracy. We propose a low-rank gradient compressor that can i) compress gradients rapidly, ii) efficiently aggregate the compressed gradients using all-reduce, and iii) achieve test performance on par with SGD. The proposed algorithm is the only method evaluated that achieves consistent wall-clock speedups when benchmarked against regular SGD with an optimized communication backend. We demonstrate reduced training times for convolutional networks as well as LSTMs on common datasets.


Unsupervised Scalable Representation Learning for Multivariate Time Series

Neural Information Processing Systems

Time series constitute a challenging data type for machine learning algorithms, due to their highly variable lengths and sparse labeling in practice. In this paper, we tackle this challenge by proposing an unsupervised method to learn universal embeddings of time series. Unlike previous works, it is scalable with respect to their length and we demonstrate the quality, transferability and practicability of the learned representations with thorough experiments and comparisons. To this end, we combine an encoder based on causal dilated convolutions with a novel triplet loss employing time-based negative sampling, obtaining general-purpose representations for variable length and multivariate time series. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


Safe Adaptive Importance Sampling

Neural Information Processing Systems

Importance sampling has become an indispensable strategy to speed up optimization algorithms for large-scale applications. Improved adaptive variants -- using importance values defined by the complete gradient information which changes during optimization -- enjoy favorable theoretical properties, but are typically computationally infeasible. In this paper we propose an efficient approximation of gradient-based sampling, which is based on safe bounds on the gradient. The proposed sampling distribution is (i) provably the \emph{best sampling} with respect to the given bounds, (ii) always better than uniform sampling and fixed importance sampling and (iii) can efficiently be computed -- in many applications at negligible extra cost. The proposed sampling scheme is generic and can easily be integrated into existing algorithms.


COLA: Decentralized Linear Learning

Neural Information Processing Systems

Decentralized machine learning is a promising emerging paradigm in view of global challenges of data ownership and privacy. We consider learning of linear classification and regression models, in the setting where the training data is decentralized over many user devices, and the learning algorithm must run on-device, on an arbitrary communication network, without a central coordinator. We propose COLA, a new decentralized training algorithm with strong theoretical guarantees and superior practical performance. Our framework overcomes many limitations of existing methods, and achieves communication efficiency, scalability, elasticity as well as resilience to changes in data and allows for unreliable and heterogeneous participating devices. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


Efficient Use of Limited-Memory Accelerators for Linear Learning on Heterogeneous Systems

Neural Information Processing Systems

We propose a generic algorithmic building block to accelerate training of machine learning models on heterogeneous compute systems. Our scheme allows to efficiently employ compute accelerators such as GPUs and FPGAs for the training of large-scale machine learning models, when the training data exceeds their memory capacity. Also, it provides adaptivity to any system's memory hierarchy in terms of size and processing speed. Our technique is built upon novel theoretical insights regarding primal-dual coordinate methods, and uses duality gap information to dynamically decide which part of the data should be made available for fast processing. To illustrate the power of our approach we demonstrate its performance for training of generalized linear models on a large-scale dataset exceeding the memory size of a modern GPU, showing an order-of-magnitude speedup over existing approaches.


Sparsified SGD with Memory

Neural Information Processing Systems

Huge scale machine learning problems are nowadays tackled by distributed optimization algorithms, i.e. algorithms that leverage the compute power of many devices for training. The communication overhead is a key bottleneck that hinders perfect scalability. Various recent works proposed to use quantization or sparsification techniques to reduce the amount of data that needs to be communicated, for instance by only sending the most significant entries of the stochastic gradient (top-k sparsification). Whilst such schemes showed very promising performance in practice, they have eluded theoretical analysis so far. In this work we analyze Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) with k-sparsification or compression (for instance top-k or random-k) and show that this scheme converges at the same rate as vanilla SGD when equipped with error compensation (keeping track of accumulated errors in memory).


Communication-Efficient Distributed Dual Coordinate Ascent

Neural Information Processing Systems

Communication remains the most significant bottleneck in the performance of distributed optimization algorithms for large-scale machine learning. In this paper, we propose a communication-efficient framework, COCOA, that uses local computation in a primal-dual setting to dramatically reduce the amount of necessary communication. We provide a strong convergence rate analysis for this class of algorithms, as well as experiments on real-world distributed datasets with implementations in Spark. In our experiments, we find that as compared to state-of-the-art mini-batch versions of SGD and SDCA algorithms, COCOA converges to the same .001-accurate Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


On the Global Linear Convergence of Frank-Wolfe Optimization Variants

Neural Information Processing Systems

The Frank-Wolfe (FW) optimization algorithm has lately re-gained popularity thanks in particular to its ability to nicely handle the structured constraints appearing in machine learning applications. However, its convergence rate is known to be slow (sublinear) when the solution lies at the boundary. A simple less-known fix is to add the possibility to take away steps' during optimization, an operation that importantly does not require a feasibility oracle. In this paper, we highlight and clarify several variants of the Frank-Wolfe optimization algorithm that has been successfully applied in practice: FW with away steps, pairwise FW, fully-corrective FW and Wolfe's minimum norm point algorithm, and prove for the first time that they all enjoy global linear convergence under a weaker condition than strong convexity. The constant in the convergence rate has an elegant interpretation as the product of the (classical) condition number of the function with a novel geometric quantity that plays the role of the condition number' of the constraint set.