Computer Games


More than half of UK gaming industry based outside south-east

The Guardian

More than half of the Britain's video games industry is based outside London and the south-east, according to a report from the sector's trade body, with gaming directly contributing more than £1.35bn to the UK economy. The report reveals that the UK gaming industry employs more than 16,000 people. Ukie, the trade body that produced the report, argues that this makes the sector the most productive of all of the nation's creative industries, with each individual employee contributing more than £80,000 to the national economy. The regional distribution of that contribution is significantly more than many other creative industries. Where more than half of the film industry, by company, is based in London, the figure is 28% for games, with significant sectoral hubs based in more than 20 towns and cities nationwide.


Nintendo no longer repairing Wii video game consoles

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

If you have a Nintendo Wii in need of repair, it may be game over for the video game system. Nintendo is no longer offering repairs for Wii systems in the U.S., the game maker says online. However, many issues can be resolved by following the troubleshooting steps on our support site," the company says on its customer support site. The video game company said Monday it is ending repairs for the game console in Japan as of March 31 because it has had trouble getting parts to repair the console. Several tech news websites including Engadget reported the announcement from Japan.


Artificial Intelligence In Video Games - Latest, Trending Automation News

#artificialintelligence

We have seen many applications of AI in industry sectors but in regards to the entertainment niche, Artificial Intelligence continues to diversify day by day operations. Video Games are an essential part of almost every person out there, after a tiring day of work, we all relax with a video game whether it is on our handheld device or dedicated gaming rig. The goal of Artificial Intelligence in video games is not limited to competitive gameplay but rather it intends to create the most enjoyable AI for players to compete with. The inclusion of AI in games dates back to the early 90s when Wolfstein 3D came out but the AI non-player character (NPC) was at the beginning level at that time. It implemented simple concepts such as to evade the player's attacks and attack when the appropriate time came, all in an enclosed finite state machine.


5 AIs in Search of a Campus

#artificialintelligence

To grasp how artificial intelligence will play out in higher education, and how we can strategically address these changes, we should think about how artificial intelligence might unfold over the next few years. In late 2019, professors research, create, critique, and teach various forms of artificial intelligence. Students, staff, and faculty increasingly experience artificial intelligence in digital devices, ranging from autonomous vehicles to software-guided computer game opponents, that are unsupported by the campus IT department. AI capabilities are gradually infusing the services, used by all in the campus community, of powerful computing enterprises such as Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Microsoft. Homegrown experiments are under way on our campuses, while vendors offer AI tools for us to purchase and implement.


Sizing the U.S. Student Cohort for Computer Science

Communications of the ACM

Alan Kay, Cathie Norris, Elliot Soloway, and I had an article in the September 2019 issue of Communications called "Computational Thinking Should Just Be Good Thinking" (access the article at http://bit.ly/2P7RYEV). Our argument is that "computational thinking" is already here--students use computing every day, and that computing is undoubtedly influencing their thinking. What we really care about is effective, critical, "expanded" thinking, where computing helps us think. To do that, we need better computing. Ken Kahn engaged with our article in the comments section (thank you, Ken!), and he made a provocative comment: There are have been many successful attempts to add programming to games: Rocky's Boots (1982), Robot Odyssey (1984), RoboSport (1991), Minecraft (multiple extensions), and probably many more.


As Esports Take Off, High School Leagues Get In The Game

NPR Technology

Assistant Principal Miles Carey oversees a Rocket League practice at Washington-Liberty High School in Arlington, Va. Assistant Principal Miles Carey oversees a Rocket League practice at Washington-Liberty High School in Arlington, Va. Nowadays, if you're a teenager who's good at video games there's a lot more to be had than just a pot of virtual gold. Today, more than 170 colleges and universities participate. Naturally, high schools have followed suit.


Turn Your Customers into Your Community

#artificialintelligence

In the early 2000s, facing growing competition from video games and the internet, LEGO found itself on the brink of bankruptcy. The company continued to struggle before staging a remarkable turnaround and surpassing Mattel to become the world's largest toy maker. Central to that transformation was a fundamental shift in how LEGO approached their customers. For more than 75 years of its history, LEGO made toys exclusively for customers in a closed innovation process. But over the last decade, LEGO learned how to build with their fan community.


Will the success of The Witcher herald a golden age of game-to-TV adaptations?

The Guardian

It is a truth, universally accepted, that video games do not translate well to the big screen. From Assassin's Creed to the Super Mario Bros movie, the result is usually a compromised monstrosity, ignorant of the source material and quickly disowned by the studios, directors and actors responsible for it. There have been exceptions – Detective Pikachu was weird but fine and the Resident Evil films have their fans. But films based on games are usually a mess. Have licensing managers been looking at the wrong screen the whole time?


Google boss gives warning about future of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence must be regulated to save humanity from being hit by its dangers, Google's boss has said. The potential damage the technology could do means it is "too important" not to be constrained, according to Sundar Pichai. While it has the potential to save and improve lives, it could also cause damage through misleading videos and the "nefarious uses of facial recognition", he wrote in the New York Times, calling on the world to work together to define what the future of AI should look like. Regulation would be required to prevent AI being influenced by bias, as well as protect public safety and privacy, he said. "Growing up in India, I was fascinated by technology. Each new invention changed my family's life in meaningful ways. The telephone saved us long trips to the hospital for test results. The refrigerator meant we could spend less time preparing meals, and television allowed us to see the world news and cricket matches we had only imagined while listening to the short-wave radio," he said.


Wild ideas in science: Robots will never think like us

#artificialintelligence

Today's AI systems are superhuman. Computer models based loosely on the neural networks in our brains are trained on vast amounts of data using huge clusters of processors. They can now classify objects in images better than we can. And as IBM and Google's DeepMind have demonstrated, they can beat us at games such as chess and Go, and even achieve the highest rank in the computer game StarCraft II. But at the same time, AI systems are inhuman.