Military


Why Unsupervised Machine Learning is the Future of Cybersecurity

#artificialintelligence

As we move towards a future where we lean on cybersecurity much more in our daily lives, it's important to be aware of the differences in the types of AI being used for network security. Over the last decade, Machine Learning has made huge progress in technology with Supervised and Reinforcement learning, in everything from photo recognition to self-driving cars. However, Supervised Learning is limited in its network security abilities like finding threats because it only looks for specifics that it has seen or labeled before, whereas Unsupervised Learning is constantly searching the network to find anomalies. Machine Learning comes in a few forms: Supervised, Reinforcement, Unsupervised and Semi-Supervised (also known as Active Learning). Supervised Learning relies on a process of labeling in order to "understand" information.


Researchers And Army Join Hands to Protect the Military's AI Systems

#artificialintelligence

As an initiative to provide protection to the military's artificial intelligence systems from cyber-attacks, researchers from Delhi University and the Army have joined hands, as per a recent Army news release. As the Army increasingly utilizes AI frameworks to identify dangers, the Army Research Office is investing in more security. This move was a very calculated one in fact as it drew reference from the NYU supported CSAW HackML competition in 2019 where one of the many major goals was to develop such a software that would prevent cyber attackers from hacking into the facial and object recognition software the military uses to further train its AI. MaryAnne Fields, program manager for the ARO's intelligent systems, said in a statement, "Object recognition is a key component of future intelligent systems, and the Army must safeguard these systems from cyber-attack. This work will lay the foundations for recognizing and mitigating backdoor attacks in which the data used to train the object recognition system is subtly altered to give incorrect answers."


Budget 2020: Can Budget boost Artificial Intelligence sector?

#artificialintelligence

"One of the biggest areas where countries are vying for dominance is Artificial Intelligence, which is expected to have a huge impact not only in commerce but also in areas like health, national security, cybersecurity, food security, education, and global warming. Unfortunately, countries like USA and China are leaving India behind in terms of AI research, AI entrepreneurship and government investment in AI. AI Grand Challenges: The government can announce AI grand challenges that are open to teams from academia and industry that involve solves an important problem for India. The government's role in this would be to give a crisp problem definition, provide access to the data and of course provide a good cash prize. Such AI grand challenges will result in important problems getting solved, new startups and jobs, and capture the nation's imagination and give an impetus to the field of AI. Make it easier to access capital: One of the biggest challenges that startups face is early-stage funding. The government could announce a fund on the likes of Singapore's Temasek that will invest only in early-stage Indian AI startups. Also, the government could announce lower long term capital gain's tax for investing in AI-based startups. This will encourage more angel investment into AI start-ups. Improve AI talent in the country: While there are a lot of engineers being produced in India, we still lag behind other countries in terms of the number of AI PhDs and AI research. The government should make more research grants available for AI research and should also offer incentives to institutes that invest in AI training. Ease of doing Business: Government focus should be on bringing policies that encourage AI companies. There should be less red tape, more freedom from the government departments so that entrepreneurs can be focused on building solutions without unnecessary distractions."


AI in Cybersecurity: 2020 Predictions

#artificialintelligence

Critical attacks and massive breaches escalated dramatically in 2019 and it is predicted that by the year 2020, costs related to damage caused by cybersecurity breaches may reach $5 trillion. As attacks increase cybersecurity teams are overworked, understaffed, and are grasping for solutions to solve an increasing amount of problems. The current state of AI is begging for a number of problems to be solved in order to continue effectively protecting users from malicious actors. Due to an extreme shortage of cybersecurity professionals, many companies are turning to Artificial Intelligence as a sort of panacea to better defend their networks and make up for a lack of personnel. Another layer of complexity gets added when we consider the false positive or negative problem most security companies have because they are either setting their thresholds too high or too low.


Taking on Modern Day Gremlins With Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Online glitches are basically modern day gremlins--and they can cost companies millions of dollars. With so much data to check and double-check, maybe artificial intelligence (AI) can help stop these "gremlins" from wreaking havoc online. Perhaps the most iconic World War II cartoon is the Warner Bros. episode "Falling Hare." Bugs Bunny pooh-poohs the notion of gremlins committing sabotage on the Allied war effort, until those little creatures cause malfunctions in everything from bombs to planes, with devastating results in the Merrie Melodies classic. SEE ALSO: The'Quantum Computing' Decade Is Coming--Why You Should Care According to Robert O. Harder, in a piece published by MHQ--The Quarterly Journal of Military History, "gremlins" were tall tales told by pilots of mischief makers that would infect aircraft, causing all kinds of maladies.


How the Pentagon's JAIC Picks Its Artificial Intelligence-Driven Projects

#artificialintelligence

The Pentagon launched its Joint Artificial Intelligence Center in 2018 to strategically unify and accelerate AI applications across the nation's defense and military enterprise. Insiders at the center have now spent about nine months executing that defense driven AI-support. At an ACT-IAC forum in Washington Wednesday, Rachael Martin, the JAIC's mission chief of Intelligent Business Automation Augmentation and Analytics, highlighted insiders' early approach to automation and innovation. "Our mission is to transform the [Defense] business process through AI technologies, to improve efficiency and accuracy--but really to do all those things so that we can improve our overall warfighter support," Martin said. Within her specific mission area, Martin and the team explore and develop automated applications that support a range of efforts across the Pentagon, such as business administration, human capital management, acquisitions, finance and budget training, and beyond.


C3.ai: accelerating digital transformation

#artificialintelligence

As one of the leading enterprise AI software providers, C3.ai is renowned for building enterprise-scale AI applications and harnessing digital transformation. The C3 AI Suite is software that uses a model-driven architecture to speed up delivery and reduce the complexities of developing enterprise-scale AI applications. Supply Chain Digital takes a closer look at the AI firm. The Suite propels organisations to deliver AI-enabled applications quicker than alternative methods while reducing the technical debt from maintaining and upgrading these applications. Its solutions cater to a range of different industries such as manufacturing, oil and gas, utilities, banking, aerospace and defence, healthcare, retail, telecoms, smart cities and transportation.


People can now be identified at a distance by their heartbeat

#artificialintelligence

BEFORE PULLING the trigger, a sniper planning to assassinate an enemy operative must be sure the right person is in the cross-hairs. Western forces commonly use software that compares a suspect's facial features or gait with those recorded in libraries of biometric data compiled by police and intelligence agencies. Such technology can, however, be foiled by a disguise, head-covering or even an affected limp. For this reason America's Special Operations Command (SOC), which oversees the units responsible for such operations in the various arms of America's forces, has long wanted extra ways to confirm a potential target's identity. Responding to a request from SOC, the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office (CTTSO), an agency of the defence department, has now developed a new tool for the job.


U.S. Space Force logo draws comparisons to 'Star Trek'

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump unveiled the logo for the U.S. Space Force on Friday, attracting critics who said America's newest military branch had boldly gone where "Star Trek" went before. With a central symbol resembling an arrowhead, ringed by an orbiting object and set to a starry backdrop, many people argued the design was pilfered from the famous science fiction franchise. But a spokesman for the branch hit back, arguing that the "Delta" emblem had been used by U.S. Air Force space organizations as early as 1961, before the first Star Trek show aired. The emblem also closely resembles the "widget" logo adopted by Delta Air Lines in 1959. "After consultation with our Great Military Leaders, designers, and others, I am pleased to present the new logo for the United States Space Force, the Sixth Branch of our Magnificent Military!" wrote Trump of the branch he championed and which came into being in December 2019.


Pentagon says 34 troops suffered traumatic brain injuries in Iran strike

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The Pentagon disclosed on Friday that 34 U.S. service members suffered traumatic brain injury in Iran's missile strike this month on an Iraqi air base, and although half have returned to work, the casualty total belies President Donald Trump's initial claim that no Americans were harmed. He later characterized the injuries as "not very serious." Eight of the injured arrived in the United States on Friday from Germany, where they and nine others had been flown days after the Jan. 8 missile strike on Iraq's Ain al-Asad air base. The nine still in Germany are receiving treatment and evaluation at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, the largest U.S. military hospital outside the continental United States. Jonathan Hoffman, the chief Pentagon spokesman, said the eight in the U.S. will be treated at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland, or at their home bases.