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IoT Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence Services to Reach US$10.6 Billion in 2026

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The value of data is increasing, and that value is stimulating the Internet of Things (IoT) Advanced Analytics Market, with the emergence of accessible out-of-the-box and off-the-shelf machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) solutions. Vendors are now easing access to ML and AI toolsets by expanding availability through deployment options that include the edge, on-premises, cloud, Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). Global tech market advisory firm, ABI Research, finds that the IoT ML and AI market will reach US$1.09 billion in 2020 and grow to US$10.6 billion in 2026. Edge ML/AI is more prevalent in manufacturing and industrial segments, where there is an immediate need to assess, transform and augment data as it is being generated through functions of quick pattern recognition, labeling, and protocol optimization. "The IoT Edge Advanced Analytics Market is essentially operationalized ML and AI products and services targeted at Operational Technology (OT) teams to understand and extract insights," explains Kateryna Dubrova, Research Analyst at ABI Research.


U.S. Navy to tap Google machine learning for repairs

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In a Thursday event unveiling a slew of new home devices ahead of the holidays, Amazon made clearer than ever its determination to flood America with cameras, microphones and the voice of Alexa, its AI assistant. The big picture: Updating popular products and expanding its range to car alarms and in-home drones, Amazon extended its lead in smart home devices and moved into new areas including cloud gaming and car security. The new offerings will also fuel criticism that the tech giant is helping equip a society built around surveillance.


Kids' brains may hold the secret to building better AI

#artificialintelligence

The mathematician and computer science pioneer Alan Turing hit on a promising direction for artificial intelligence research way back in 1950. "Instead of trying to produce a program to simulate the adult mind," he wrote, "why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child's?" Now AI researchers are finally putting Turing's ideas into action. They're realizing that by paying attention to how children process information, they can pick up valuable lessons about how to create machines that learn. DARPA, the Defense Department's advanced research agency, is embracing this approach.


Sentinel loads up with $1.35M in the deepfake detection arms race – TechCrunch

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Estonia-based Sentinel, which is developing a detection platform for identifying synthesized media (aka deepfakes), has closed a $1.35 million seed round from some seasoned angel investors -- including Jaan Tallinn (Skype), Taavet Hinrikus (TransferWise), Ragnar Sass & Martin Henk (Pipedrive) -- and Baltics early-stage VC firm, United Angels VC. The challenge of building tools to detect deepfakes has been likened to an arms race -- most recently by tech giant Microsoft, which earlier this month launched a detector tool in the hopes of helping pick up disinformation aimed at November's U.S. election. "The fact that [deepfakes are] generated by AI that can continue to learn makes it inevitable that they will beat conventional detection technology," it warned, before suggesting there's still short-term value in trying to debunk malicious fakes with "advanced detection technologies." Sentinel co-founder and CEO Johannes Tammekänd agrees on the arms race point -- which is why its approach to this "goal-post-shifting" problem entails offering multiple layers of defence, following a cybersecurity-style template. He says rival tools -- mentioning Microsoft's detector and another rival, Deeptrace, aka Sensity -- are, by contrast, only relying on "one fancy neural network that tries to detect defects," as he puts it.


The National Guard's Fire-Mapping Drones Get an AI Upgrade

WIRED

More than 3 million acres of California have burned this year, and 18,000 firefighters are still battling 27 major wildfires across the sooty state sometimes called golden. And every day, high above the smoke, a military drone with a wingspan roughly 10 times that of LeBron James feeds infrared video of the flames back to March Air Reserve Base, east of Los Angeles, to help map the destruction and assist firefighters. These MQ-9 "Reaper" drones don't usually fly domestic--they're on standby in case the Air Force needs them for overseas reconnaissance. But climate change has helped make crisscrossing California gathering video a new fall tradition for the 163rd Attack Wing. Its drones have helped map wildfires every year since 2017, thanks to special permission from the secretary of defense.


MoD unveils drone armed with twin shotguns and machine vision

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Ministry of Defence has unveiled a drone armed with twin stabilised shotguns that uses AI to identify its targets. The drone has six rotor blades and is attached with a camera to provide a live-stream of indoor conflicts to a remote solider, who fires the device's weapons. A first prototype of the metre-long machine, which is designed only for indoor combat, has been called the i9. MoD has developed the flying'armed fighter' with an undisclosed British company to deploy specifically in urban situations, such as buildings barricaded by armed personnel. MoD told MailOnline it's unable to provide photos of the prototype, as this has been developed with a UK start-up that is in negotiations around Series A funding, and is therefore in'stealth mode' or without a public profile (stock image) 'UK Strategic Command has been developing a capability under Project i9 to develop an armed urban warfare unmanned aerial system (UAS),' MoD said in a statement to MailOnline.


Artificial Intelligence Helps Define Army's Future

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Artificial intelligence technology tested during the Army's Project Convergence exercise largely met expectations and will help transform the way the Army fights in the future, officials say. Army officials held a media roundtable September 23 to discuss lessons learned during the recently completed Project Convergence, which is designed to ensure the Army, as part of the joint force, can rapidly and continuously converge effects across all domains--air, land, maritime, space and cyberspace--to overmatch adversaries in both competition and actual conflict. A key part of the Army's massive modernization effort, the project focuses on people, weapons systems, information, command and control, and terrain to assess areas of advancement and identify areas for improvement. Artificial intelligence, or AI, played a role, along with autonomy and robotics, which Gen. John Murray, USA, commanding general, Army Futures Command, describes as three key technologies for the Army's future. Gen. Murray compares the trio of technological capabilities to those that gave the Germans an initial advantage during World War II.


New Army 'Accelerated Multi-Node Attack' enabled by AI at Project Convergence 2020

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Gray Eagle drones were armed with HELLFIRE missiles and GBU-69 glide bombs, 155mm artillery weapons fired rounds 60km (37.3 miles) to destroy SA-22 enemy air defenses and armored ground combat vehicles directly hit multiple T-72 tanks during the Army's Project Convergence 2020 at Yuma Proving Grounds, Ariz. The real story, however, according to senior Army leaders attending the service's transformational combat experiment, was about data sharing, networked targeting and a cutting edge AI system called FIRESTORM. "The bullet flying through the air and exploding is interesting, but that is not what is compelling about Project Convergence. It is everything that happens before the trigger is pulled. We did not come out here for a precision-fires exercise, what we came out here to do is increase the speed of information between sensing the target and passing that information to the effector," Brig.


15 Amazing and Weird Technologies That'll Change the World in the Next Few Decades

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Let's go back to a simpler time. It is the early or late 90s. You are eight years old, waking up early to catch the latest action-filled episodes of your Saturday morning cartoons; TV shows that portray what technology may look like in the future. In Japan, popular anime shows like Outlaw Star, Mobile Suit Gundam, and Cowboy Bebop. These shows would pull viewers in, giving us a taste of the future for breakfast. They would show us worlds where humans and cyborgs were almost unidentifiable from each other, where trips to space were as simple as catching a bus, or where artificial intelligence and robotics were used to better humanity (and used for epic battles in space).


Air Force Betting on New Robotic Wingman

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The next year will be pivotal for the Air Force's effort to acquire a new class of autonomous drones, as industry teams compete for a chance to build a fleet of robotic wingmen that will soon undergo operational experimentation. The "Skyborg" program is one of the service's top science-and-technology priorities under the "Vanguard" initiative to deliver game-changing capabilities to its warfighters. The aim is to acquire relatively inexpensive, attritable unmanned aircraft that can leverage artificial intelligence and accompany manned fighter jets into battle. "I expect that we will do sorties where a set number are expected to fly with the manned systems, and we'll have crazy new [concepts of operation] for how they'll be used," Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Will Roper said during an online event hosted by the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. The platforms might even be called upon to conduct kamikaze missions.