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AI named after V For Vendetta masks protects photos from being gathered by facial recognition apps

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Clearview AI is just one of many facial recognition firms scraping billions of online images to create a massive database for purchase – but a new program could block their efforts. Researchers designed an image clocking tool that makes subtle pixel-level changes that distort pictures enough so they cannot be used by online scrapers – and claims it is 100 percent effective. Named in honor of the'V for Vendetta' mask, Fawkes is an algorithm and software combination that'cloaks' an image to trick systems, which is like adding an invisible mask to your face. These altered pictures teach technologies a distorted version of the subject and when presented with an'uncloaked' form, the scraping app fails to recognize the individual. 'It might surprise some to learn that we started the Fawkes project a while before the New York Times article that profiled Clearview.ai in February 2020,' researchers from the SANLab at University of Chicago shared in a statement.


Automated Quantification of CT Patterns Associated with COVID-19 from Chest CT

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To present a method that automatically segments and quantifies abnormal CT patterns commonly present in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), namely ground glass opacities and consolidations. In this retrospective study, the proposed method takes as input a non-contrasted chest CT and segments the lesions, lungs, and lobes in three dimensions, based on a dataset of 9749 chest CT volumes. The method outputs two combined measures of the severity of lung and lobe involvement, quantifying both the extent of COVID-19 abnormalities and presence of high opacities, based on deep learning and deep reinforcement learning. The first measure of (PO, PHO) is global, while the second of (LSS, LHOS) is lobe-wise. Evaluation of the algorithm is reported on CTs of 200 participants (100 COVID-19 confirmed patients and 100 healthy controls) from institutions from Canada, Europe and the United States collected between 2002-Present (April 2020).


AI Chip Startup Syntiant Scales Production

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Syntiant Corp., the "neural decision processor" startup, announced completion of another funding round this week along with the shipment of more than 1 million low-power edge AI chips. The three-year-old startup based in Irvine, Calif., said Tuesday (Aug. The round was led by Microsoft's (NASDAQ: MSFT) venture arm M12 and Applied Ventures, the investment fund of Applied Materials (NASDAQ: AMAT). New investors included Atlantic Bridge Capital, Alpha Edison and Miramar Digital Ventures. Intel Capital was an early backer of Syntiant, part of a package of investments the chip maker announced in 2018 targeting AI processors that promise to accelerate the transition of machine learning from the cloud to edge devices.


Artificial intelligence-enhanced ECGs may speed heart failure diagnosis and treatment – BioNews Central

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When people seek emergency care for shortness of breath, a routine electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) enhanced by artificial intelligence (AI) is better than standard blood tests at determining if the cause is heart failure, according to new research published today in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, an American Heart Association journal. "Determining why someone has shortness of breath is challenging for emergency department physicians, and this AI-enabled ECG provides a rapid and effective method to screen these patients for left ventricular systolic dysfunction," said Demilade Adedinsewo, M.D., M.P.H., lead author of the study and chief fellow in the division of cardiovascular medicine at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. The left ventricle supplies most of the heart's pumping power, so it is larger than the other chambers and essential for normal function. In left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD), the left ventricle is weakened and must work harder to maintain adequate blood flow to the body. In a typical year, about 1.2 million people go to emergency departments because they are short of breath.


Tamr Helps Air Force Wrangle Data

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Data prepper Tamr Inc. will assist the U.S. Air Force in boosting utilization of its air assets under a five-year contract designed to use machine learning techniques to accelerate the flight certification process for new aircraft configurations. Those configurations include equipping front-line aircraft with new weapons, sensors and defenses such as electronic warfare pods. Tamr said the contract with the Air Force's Seek Eagle Office could be worth as much $60 million. The office based at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is responsible for integration new technologies into front-line aircraft. The Air Force office will use Tamr's machine learning platform to organize more than 30 years of aircraft performance studies dispersed across the organization.


From Medical To Consumer Facing: Next Wave of NeuroScience Technology - Herbert R. Sim

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Brain-computer interfaces are seeing massive AI breakthroughs including neural bridges being built for learning, treatment of specific diseases and overcoming the electrical-to-biochemical language barrier. These trends are what will optimise the information bandwidth that comes with neuroscience technology. "A monkey has been able to control a computer with its brain." That almost unimaginable yet remarkably accurate observation was made by Elon Musk, author and CEO of Tesla. In his presentation, Musk switched between varying forms of "what is" to "what could be", before announcing the details surrounding Tesla Energy.


New machine learning method allows hospitals to share patient data -- privately

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PHILADELPHIA - To answer medical questions that can be applied to a wide patient population, machine learning models rely on large, diverse datasets from a variety of institutions. However, health systems and hospitals are often resistant to sharing patient data, due to legal, privacy, and cultural challenges. An emerging technique called federated learning is a solution to this dilemma, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Scientific Reports, led by senior author Spyridon Bakas, PhD, an instructor of Radiology and Pathology & Laboratory Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Federated learning -- an approach first implemented by Google for keyboards' autocorrect functionality -- trains an algorithm across multiple decentralized devices or servers holding local data samples, without exchanging them. While the approach could potentially be used to answer many different medical questions, Penn Medicine researchers have shown that federated learning is successful specifically in the context of brain imaging, by being able to analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of brain tumor patients and distinguish healthy brain tissue from cancerous regions.


Artificial Intelligence and Its Partners

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The creation of the Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI) reflects the growing interest of states in AI technologies. The initiative, which brings together 14 countries and the European Union, will help participants establish practical cooperation and formulate common approaches to the development and implementation of AI. At the same time, it is a symptom of the growing technological rivalry in the world, primarily between the United States and China. Russia's ability to interact with the GPAI may be limited for political reasons, but, from a practical point of view, cooperation would help the country implement its national AI strategy. The Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI) was officially launched on June 15, 2020, at the initiative of the G7 countries alongside Australia, India, Mexico, New Zealand, South Korea, Singapore, Slovenia and the European Union. According to the Joint Statement from the Founding Members, the GPAI is an "international and multistakeholder initiative to guide the responsible development and use of AI, grounded in human rights, inclusion, diversity, innovation, and economic growth."


Ex-Google Exec Sent to Prison for Stealing Robocar Secrets

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A former Google engineer has been sentenced to 18 months in prison after pleading guilty to stealing trade secrets before joining Uber's effort to build robotic vehicles for its ride-hailing service. The sentence handed down Tuesday by U.S. District Judge William Alsup came more than four months after former Google engineer Anthony Levandowski reached a plea agreement with the federal prosecutors who brought a criminal case against him last August. Levandowski, who helped steer Google's self-driving car project before landing at Uber, was also ordered to pay more than $850,000. Alsup had taken the unusual step of recommending the Justice Department open a criminal investigation into Levandowski while presiding over a high-profile civil trial between Uber and Waymo, a spinoff from a self-driving car project that Google began in 2007 after hiring Levandowski to be part of its team. Levandowski eventually became disillusioned with Google and left the company in early 2016 to start his own self-driving truck company, called Otto, which Uber eventually bought for $680 million. He wound up pleading guilty to one count, culminating in Tuesday's sentencing.


Tulane to use artificial intelligence to study how nation's schools are responding to coronavirus

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The U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences has awarded the National Center for Research on Education Access and Choice (REACH) at Tulane University a $100,000 contract to collect data from approximately 150,000 school websites across the country to see how the nation's education system is responding to the coronavirus pandemic. The project, which will track traditional public schools, charter schools and private schools, aims to quickly answer questions that are critical for understanding how students are learning when school buildings are closed. Key questions include: how many schools are providing any kind of instructional support; which are delivering online instruction; what resources are they offering to students and how do students stay in contact with teachers? "This data will also help answer important questions about equity in the school system, showing how responses differ according to characteristics like spending levels, student demographics, internet access, and if there are differences based on whether it is a private, charter or traditional public school," said REACH National Director Douglas N. Harris, Schlieder Foundation Chair in Public Education and chair of economics at Tulane University School of Liberal Arts. REACH will work in cooperation with Nicholas Mattei, assistant professor of computer science at Tulane University School of Science and Engineering, to create a computer program that will collect data from every school and district website in the country.