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The science that proves making your tea in the microwave is a truly appalling act

Mashable

If you've ever had a furious debate about the ungodly act of microwaving your cup of tea and how "it's the same" as boiling the kettle, you're about to lose -- not only to Britain but to science. Researchers have explained the process your zapped cuppa goes through in a new study published in the American Institute of Physics' peer-reviewed online journal AIP Advances, and why you might not be getting the best results from making it this way over the traditional kettle/stove method. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, looked at how heating liquid works in a microwave, and how the electric field that acts as a warming source causes the liquid to end up different temperatures at the top and bottom of the cup. A good cup of tea is all about getting uniform temperature throughout your water and, though many scholars have studied uniformity and how to solve it within the microwave itself, these researchers have offered up a different possible solution (more on that later). Typically, the study describes, if you're warming a liquid like water on the stove or within a kettle, the heating source warms the container from below.


Artificial Intelligence and Its Partners

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The creation of the Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI) reflects the growing interest of states in AI technologies. The initiative, which brings together 14 countries and the European Union, will help participants establish practical cooperation and formulate common approaches to the development and implementation of AI. At the same time, it is a symptom of the growing technological rivalry in the world, primarily between the United States and China. Russia's ability to interact with the GPAI may be limited for political reasons, but, from a practical point of view, cooperation would help the country implement its national AI strategy. The Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI) was officially launched on June 15, 2020, at the initiative of the G7 countries alongside Australia, India, Mexico, New Zealand, South Korea, Singapore, Slovenia and the European Union. According to the Joint Statement from the Founding Members, the GPAI is an "international and multistakeholder initiative to guide the responsible development and use of AI, grounded in human rights, inclusion, diversity, innovation, and economic growth."


Artificial Intelligence Before Explosion – Here are Promising AI Projects - Intelvue

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is not the one that is borne by the overwhelming science fiction vision. In the near future, we will see almost every area of life in order to make our activities more effective and interactive. According to China's search engine, Baidu's top researcher, "Reliability of speech technology approaches the point we will only use and do not even think about." Andrew Ng says the best technology is often invisible, and speech recognition will disappear in the background as well. Baidu is currently working on more accurate speech recognition and more efficient sentence analysis, which expects sound technologies to be able to interact with multiple devices such as household appliances.


As Covid-19 hounds the world, AI and IoT lead the charge in Healthcare 4.0 - ET HealthWorld

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By Pradeep Kolankari, Senior Director, Medical Devices and Healthcare, Capgemini At a hospital in Wuhan in China, robots and IoT devices were used to check patients' temperatures, as well as monitor their heart rates and sugar levels through a smart bracelet worn by patients. They also cleaned and disinfected the area, apart from providing food and medicines to patients. Best of all, they even entertained patients with some dance moves. Welcome to the age of the Internet of Things (IoT) in healthcare! Globally, the healthcare landscape is stretched.


Is China Winning the AI Race?

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CAMBRIDGE – COVID-19 has become a severe stress test for countries around the world. From supply-chain management and health-care capacity to regulatory reform and economic stimulus, the pandemic has mercilessly punished governments that did not – or could not – adapt quickly. From Latin America's lost decade in the 1980s to the more recent Greek crisis, there are plenty of painful reminders of what happens when countries cannot service their debts. A global debt crisis today would likely push millions of people into unemployment and fuel instability and violence around the world. The virus has also pulled back the curtain on one of this century's most important contests: the rivalry between the United States and China for supremacy in artificial intelligence (AI).


Quantum version of the ancient game of Go could be ultimate AI test

New Scientist

A new version of the ancient Chinese board game Go that uses quantum entanglement to add an element of randomness could make it a tougher test for artificial intelligences than regular board games. "Board games have long been good test beds for AI because these games provide closed worlds with specific and simple rules," says Xian-Min Jin at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. In Go, players take turns to place a stone on a board, trying to surround and capture the opponent's stones.


Alibaba Cloud turns on new hyperscale data centres in China

ZDNet

Alibaba Cloud has added three hyperscale data centres in China and plans to build more over the next few years. The move is part of the Chinese tech giant's $28 billion investment to modernise its cloud infrastructure and support customers' digital transformation needs. Located in Hangzhou, the Jiangsu Province's Nantong, and Inner Mongolia's Ulangab, the three new sites run on Alibaba's own technologies including its Apsara Distributed OS, Hanguang 800 AI chip, and X-dragon architecture. The launch was part of its previous announcement to park another $28 billion over three years to build out its cloud infrastructure, the company said in a statement Tuesday. While coy over how the Huawei-US debacle may impact other Chinese technology vendors, Alibaba Cloud executives play up their "in Asia, for Asia" focus and investment in the region as a key competitive advantage over its US competitors, including AWS, Microsoft, and Google.


Chinese artificial intelligence company files $1.4 billion lawsuit against Apple

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Chinese artificial intelligence company Shanghai Zhizhen Intelligent Network Technology Co., Ltd., also known as Xiao-i, has filed a lawsuit against Apple Inc, alleging it has infringed on its patents. The company is calling for 10 billion yuan ($1.43 billion) in damages and demands that Apple cease "manufacturing, using, promising to sell, selling, and importing" products that infringe on the patent, it said in a social media post. Xiao-i argued that Apple's voice-recognition technology Siri infringes on a patent that it applied for in 2004 and was granted in 2009. Apple did not respond to a request for comment. Reuters was not immediately available to find a copy of the court filing.



Predicting heave and surge motions of a semi-submersible with neural networks

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Real-time motion prediction of a vessel or a floating platform can help to improve the performance of motion compensation systems. It can also provide useful early-warning information for offshore operations that are critical with regard to motion. In this study, a long short-term memory (LSTM) -based machine learning model was developed to predict heave and surge motions of a semi-submersible. The training and test data came from a model test carried out in the deep-water ocean basin, at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China. The motion and measured waves were fed into LSTM cells and then went through serval fully connected (FC) layers to obtain the prediction.