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This is how AI could feed the world's hungry while sustaining the planet

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence is transforming the world at a rapid and accelerating pace, offering huge potential, but also posing social and economic challenges. Human beings are naturally fearful of machines – this is a constant. Technological advancements tend to outpace cultural shifts. It has taken the shock of a global pandemic to accelerate the uptake of many technologies that have been around for at least a decade. Unsurprisingly, much of the public discussion on AI has focused on recent controversies around facial recognition, automated decision-making and exam algorithms.


BMF CEO John Kawola on 3D printing parts smaller than a human hair

ZDNet

Ever since I was a boy, I was fascinated by the idea of miniaturization. I read Isaac Asimov's Fantastic Voyage and then, when I finally got my hands on the movie, I probably watched it a dozen times. The premise was that a team of scientists were miniaturized to the point where they could be injected into a person and perform surgery from the inside. Another movie with a similar premise was InnerSpace, starring the incredibly well-matched team of Martin Short and Dennis Quaid. There was the whole Honey, I Shrunk the Kids series of movies and TV shows, and I ate them up as well.


How Nvidia (NVDA) Is Supporting Telemedicine And Building A Digital Health Ecosystem

#artificialintelligence

The novel coronavirus pandemic has fundamentally changed doctor-patient dynamics worldwide. On one hand, healthcare workers and doctors are tirelessly working to treat COVID patients, while on the other, elderly patients and those with chronic diseases who need routine medical check-ups are faced with increased vulnerability and the risk of contracting coronavirus during regular hospital visits. While all of this is going on, patients with milder symptoms are being encouraged to use telehealth platforms to alleviate the strain on hospital facilities. A part of the solution to all these problems is one word: telemedicine. Here's a look at what telemedicine is, and how Nvidia (NVDA) is supporting it as the broader digital health ecosystem.


The Future of Atoms: Artificial Intelligence for Nuclear Applications

#artificialintelligence

Held virtually today on the sidelines of the 64th IAEA General Conference, the first ever IAEA meeting discussing the use of artificial intelligence (AI) for nuclear applications showcased the ways in which AI-based approaches in nuclear science can benefit human health, water resource management and nuclear fusion research. Open to the public, the event gathered over 300 people from 43 countries and launched a global dialogue on the potential of AI for nuclear science and the related implications of its use, including ethics and transparency. AI refers to a collection of technologies that combine numerical data, process algorithms and continuously increasing computing power to develop systems capable of tracking complex problems in ways similar to human logic and reasoning. AI technologies can analyse large amounts of data to "learn" how to complete a particular task, a technique called machine learning. "Artificial Intelligence is advancing exponentially," said Najat Mokhtar, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications.


The Next Big Breakthrough in AI Will Be Around Language

#artificialintelligence

Most companies recognize that aggressive adoption of digital technologies is increasingly critical to being competitive. Our research shows that the top 10% of early adopters of digital technologies have grown at twice the rate of the bottom 25%, and that they are using cloud systems -- not legacy systems -- to enable adoption, a trend we expect to accelerate among industry leaders over the coming five years. Many laggard and middle-of-the-pack companies, by comparison, are dramatically underestimating the cloud resources they will need in order to access, power, or train a new generation of intelligent applications presaged by breakthroughs like GPT-3, a state-of-the-art natural language processing (NLP) tool. The big breakthroughs in AI will be about language. The 2010s produced breakthroughs in vision-enabled technologies, from accurate image searches on the web to computer vision systems for medical image analysis or for detecting defective parts in manufacturing and assembly, as we described extensively in our book and research.


COVID-19 stokes the chatbot hype in financial services

ZDNet

From cancelled conferences to disrupted supply chains, not a corner of the global economy is immune to the spread of COVID-19. Customer service has been under enormous pressure, and financial services firms such as Nationwide Building Society in the UK and the Royal Bank of Canada have launched chatbots to deal with the unusually high volume of requests. However, digital teams in financial services firms should remain wary of deploying chatbots and voice assistants faster than their customers are ready for them, or than their systems can support. To better understand chatbot capabilities in financial services, we evaluated the chatbot offering of over 150 global financial services firms. We also analyzed consumer sentiment and adoption of chatbots in Europe and North America.


Regina Barzilay wins $1M Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Squirrel AI award

AIHub

For more than 100 years Nobel Prizes have been given out annually to recognize breakthrough achievements in chemistry, literature, medicine, peace, and physics. As these disciplines undoubtedly continue to impact society, newer fields like artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics have also begun to profoundly reshape the world. In recognition of this, the world's largest AI society -- the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) -- announced yesterday the winner of their new Squirrel AI Award for Artificial Intelligence for the Benefit of Humanity, a $1 million award given to honor individuals whose work in the field has had a transformative impact on society. The recipient, Regina Barzilay, the Delta Electronics Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), is being recognized for her work developing machine learning models to develop antibiotics and other drugs, and to detect and diagnose breast cancer at early stages. In February, AAAI will officially present Barzilay with the award, which comes with an associated prize of $1 million provided by the online education company Squirrel AI. "Only world-renowned recognitions, such as the Association of Computing Machinery's A.M. Turing Award and the Nobel Prize, carry monetary rewards at the million-dollar level," says AAAI awards committee chair Yolanda Gil. "This award aims to be unique in recognizing the positive impact of artificial intelligence for humanity."


Regina Barzilay wins $1M Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Squirrel AI award

#artificialintelligence

For more than 100 years Nobel Prizes have been given out annually to recognize breakthrough achievements in chemistry, literature, medicine, peace, and physics. As these disciplines undoubtedly continue to impact society, newer fields like artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics have also begun to profoundly reshape the world. In recognition of this, the world's largest AI society -- the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) -- announced today the winner of their new Squirrel AI Award for Artificial Intelligence for the Benefit of Humanity, a $1 million award given to honor individuals whose work in the field has had a transformative impact on society. The recipient, Regina Barzilay, the Delta Electronics Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), is being recognized for her work developing machine learning models to develop antibiotics and other drugs, and to detect and diagnose breast cancer at early stages. In February, AAAI will officially present Barzilay with the award, which comes with an associated prize of $1 million provided by the online education company Squirrel AI. "Only world-renowned recognitions, such as the Association of Computing Machinery's A.M. Turing Award and the Nobel Prize, carry monetary rewards at the million-dollar level," says AAAI awards committee chair Yolanda Gil.


Hyundai Motor Group works with leading AI scholars

#artificialintelligence

Hyundai Motor Group said Thursday it has scouted Tomaso Poggio and Daniela Rus, experts on artificial intelligence, to work together on various projects of AI technology development. Poggio and Rus are serving as technology consultants and have been giving advice on utilizing AI to build planning and technological strategies for new business models, to establish a global research organization and to set investment directions for research infrastructures. Poggio, who heads the Center for Brains, Minds and Machine at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is considered as one of the founders of computational neuroscience. Rus, a renowned roboticist who is also from MIT, is director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She is a class of 2002 MacArthur fellow and has conducted research on robots and autonomous driving, according to the automaker.


MIT researcher held up as model of how algorithms can benefit humanity

#artificialintelligence

In June, when MIT artificial intelligence researcher Regina Barzilay went to Massachusetts General Hospital for a mammogram, her data were run through a deep learning model designed to assess her risk of developing breast cancer, which she had been diagnosed with once before. The workings of the algorithm, which predicted that her risk was low, were familiar: Barzilay helped build that very model, after being spurred by her 2014 cancer diagnosis to pivot her research to health care. Barzilay's work in AI, which ranges from tools for early cancer detection to platforms to identify new antibiotics, is increasingly garnering recognition: On Wednesday, the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence named Barzilay as the inaugural recipient of a new annual award honoring an individual developing or promoting AI for the good of society. The award comes with a $1 million prize sponsored by the Chinese education technology company Squirrel AI Learning. While there are already prizes in the AI field, notably the Turing Award for computer scientists, those existing awards are typically "more focused on scientific, technical contributions and ideas," said Yolanda Gil, a past president of AAAI and an AI researcher at the University of Southern California.