diabetes


Artificial Intelligence (AI) can detect low-glucose levels via ECG without fingerprick test

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Current methods to measure glucose requires needles and repeated fingerpricks over the day. Fingerpricks can often be painful, deterring patient compliance. A new technology for detecting low glucose levels via ECG using a non-invasive wearable sensor, which with the latest Artificial Intelligence can detect hypoglycaemic events from raw ECG signals has been made by researchers from the University of Warwick. Currently Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGM) are available by the NHS for hypoglycaemia detection (sugar levels into blood or derma). They measure glucose in interstitial fluid using an invasive sensor with a little needle, which sends alarms and data to a display device.


Sensors and Machine Learning: Glucose Monitoring with An AI Edge - AI Trends

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Medtronic's mission is to alleviate pain, restore health, and extend life through the application of biomedical engineering, explains Elaine Gee, PhD, Senior Principal Algorithm Engineer specializing in Artificial Intelligence at Medtronic. It's a mission Gee is well equipped for. With over 15 years' experience in modeling, bioinformatics, and engineering, she drives machine learning algorithm development and analytics to support next-generation medical devices for diabetes management. On behalf of AI Trends, Ben Lakin, from Cambridge Innovation Institute, sat down with Gee to discuss her most recent focus: algorithm development related to glucose sensing to improve the accuracy and performance of continuous glucose monitoring devices, also known as CGMs. Editor's Note: Gee will be giving a featured presentation on Advancing Continuous Glucose Monitoring Sensor Development with Machine Learning at Sensors Summit in San Diego, December 10-12.


AI can detect low-glucose levels via ECG without fingerpick test

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Sign in to report inappropriate content. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of Warwick uses the latest findings of Artificial Intelligence to detect hypoglycaemic events from raw ECG signals, via wearable sensors. The technology works with an 82% reliability, and could replace the need for invasive finger-prick testing with a needle, which could be particularly useful for paediatric age patients.


Sensors and AI spot low blood sugar without needles - Futurity

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You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. A new technology for detecting low glucose levels uses artificial intelligence to detect hypoglycemic events with ECG signals from wearable sensors, researchers report. Tracking sugar in the blood is crucial for both healthy individuals and diabetic patients, but current methods to measure glucose require needles and repeated finger pricks throughout the day. Finger pricks can often be painful, deterring patient compliance. Currently Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGM) for hypoglycemia detection measure glucose in interstitial fluid using an invasive sensor with a little needle, which sends alarms and data to a display device.


Artificial Intelligence (AI) can detect low-glucose levels via ECG without fingerpick test

#artificialintelligence

Current methods to measure glucose requires needles and repeated fingerpicks over the day. Fingerpicks can often be painful, deterring patient compliance. A new technology for detecting low glucose levels via ECG using a non-invasive wearable sensor, which with the latest Artificial Intelligence can detect hypoglycaemic events from raw ECG signals has been made by researchers from the University of Warwick. Currently Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGM) are available by the NHS for hypoglycaemia detection (sugar levels into blood or derma). They measure glucose in interstitial fluid using an invasive sensor with a little needle, which sends alarms and data to a display device.


Health tech is transforming care and setting new expectations. Are you up to speed? - MedCity News

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While technologies that impede, rather than enhance care, have made the healthcare industry somewhat skeptical of innovation, a shift toward patient-centric care is changing the game. Healthtech innovations in 2019 are helping to transform the business of care, creating efficiencies, cutting costs, and providing better outcomes. How these new technologies mesh with the clinical skill set of a medical provider is still being determined. Providers who embrace tools now available will help to determine how healthcare delivery looks in 2020 and well beyond. Here's what you need to know: If you aren't offering your patients virtual visits, it's likely they'll find someone who is Virtual visits, often conducted via a smartphone or personal computer, offer convenient access to care, saving patients the time and expense of traveling to an appointment and providing care to those who have limited access to it.


Home - KTAR.com

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Three police officers were assaulted and six juveniles were arrested after multiple fights broke out at a Mesa skate rink on Saturday night, authorities said. Weekend wrap-up: Here are the biggest Arizona stories from Jan. 3-5 Blowback: Iran abandons nuclear limits after US killing Luxury garage storage company bringing 2 new locations to the Valley Weinstein's reckoning: Trial looms 2 years after #MeToo wave Valley eye surgeon faces multiple charges for alleged billing scheme Weekend wrap-up: Here are the biggest Arizona stories from Jan. 3-5 Counting whales from space pitched as key to saving them Iraq's Parliament calls for expulsion of U.S. troops Tips on how to create, manage your budget in the new year Iraq's Parliament calls for expulsion of U.S. troops Iraq's Parliament calls for expulsion of U.S. troops Arizona ex-fire chief pleads guilty to theft charges A former fire chief accused of embezzling $40,000 from his Arizona district pleaded guilty to felony charges of theft. Valley doctor says soot from candles can be harmful to your health Candles smell good but they're not all that great for your health for one specific reason, according to one Valley doctor. Phoenix lab uses artificial intelligence to slow, manage Alzheimer's disease Arizona is projected to have one of the fastest growing rates of Alzheimer's disease in the country over the next few years, and a clinical lab testing company in the Valley is trying to reverse that. '1917,' 'Once Upon a Time ...in Hollywood' win Golden Globes See winners from the 2020 Golden Globes, hosted by Ricky Gervais.


Big Data & - Artificial Intelligence

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The course is targeted PhD students and postdocs in the field of diabetes and other Health areas, with a strong active interest and knowledge in complex data integration, as well as Big Data and Artificial Intelligence. Due to the limited number of seats on the course, you are not guaranteed a seat until you receive an e-mail with final confirmation. You will thus initially be placed on a waiting list, which will be prioritized according to your submitted abstract, motivational letter and CV. This course aims to highlight the state-of-the-art data methodologies in diabetes and other health areas within Big Data and AI and explore the strengths and limitations of using machine learning methodologies on complex diseases. In addition the course will focus on how data can contribute to molecular understanding of diseases; the diversity of methods used when working with data integration & artificial and gives the opportunity to the participants to have an idea on how their own methods relate to global efforts, and expand their horizon and network.


2020 ADA Standards of Care just arrived and now includes AI to prevent blindness

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The nation's leading association that fights against diabetes released a new set of clinical standards that for the first time include the use of autonomous artificial intelligence (AI). The American Diabetes Association (ADA)'s 2020 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes states that, "AI systems that detect more than mild diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema authorized for use by the FDA represent an alternative to traditional screening approaches." To date, IDx-DR is the first and only FDA-authorized autonomous AI diagnostic system for the detection of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. It is currently in use at a number of large health systems that each serve tens of thousands of people with diabetes and have struggled to implement diabetic retinopathy eye exams at scale for their large diabetes population. "The ADA's inclusion of our technology in its Standards of Care marks a significant move toward mainstream adoption of autonomous AI in clinical care," said Michael Abramoff, MD, PhD, Founder and Executive Chairman at IDx. "Our early customers are visionary leaders who foresaw that autonomous AI would one day become a standard of care for diabetic retinopathy screening, and taking that leap is paying off for them. Already, health systems that are using IDx-DR have experienced significant improvements in accessibility, efficiency and compliance rates, unleashing massive potential for cost savings and improved patient outcomes."


Scientists harness AI to reverse ageing in billion-dollar industry

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Who wants to live forever? Until recently, the quest to slow ageing or even reverse it was the stuff of legends – or scams. But, today, an evidence-based race to delay or prevent ageing is energising scientists worldwide. Scientists say there are already a number of things we can do to extend life and health, while promising that current and ongoing large-scale trials of drugs and other interventions mean the once-mythical goal of healthy, longer-lived lives is not far away. "Death is inevitable but ageing is not," said Dr Nir Barzilai, founding director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York.