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Microsoft-Activision deal: What will it mean? Talking Tech podcast

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Hit play on the player above to hear the podcast and follow along with the transcript below.This transcript was automatically generated, and then edited for clarity in its current form. There may be some differences between the audio and the text. Welcome back to Talking Tech. You likely heard me a couple days ago talking about Microsoft's huge deal to acquire Activision Blizzard, which is the video game publisher that makes a ton of big titles, including Call of Duty, World of Warcraft through Blizzard, and a host of others. The big concern for some video game players, particularly owners of a PlayStation, is whether they should be worried that one of the industry's biggest games and Call of Duty may no longer be on the platform.


Microsoft to buy Activision Blizzard in $69BN metaverse bet

Al Jazeera

Microsoft Corp. agreed to buy Activision Blizzard Inc. in a $68.7 billion deal, uniting two of the biggest forces in video games to create the world's third-biggest gaming company. In its largest purchase ever, Microsoft will pay $95 a share in cash for one of the most legendary gaming publishers, known for titles like Call of Duty and World of Warcraft but which is also grappling with a cultural upheaval over its treatment of women. Activision Chief Executive Officer Bobby Kotick will continue to serve in that role only until the deal closes, a person familiar with the deal said. It's unclear what position, if any, he would take afterward. Once the transaction is completed, the Activision Blizzard business will report to Phil Spencer, who was promoted along with the deal to CEO of Microsoft Gaming.


Microsoft's giant bet on Activision Blizzard is its ticket to the metaverse

ZDNet

Microsoft sent shockwaves through pretty much every corner of the tech industry when it announced its plans to acquire game publisher Activision Blizzard. The $68.7 billion ($95 per share) transaction is Microsoft's largest acquisition ever, and will create the third largest gaming brand in the world, behind Japan's Sony and China's Tencent. It will serve as a foundation for the creation of Microsoft Gaming, a new division that will encompass the entirety of the Windows maker's PC, console, and mobile gaming brands, as well as one other very important – indeed, perhaps even more important project: its plans to enter the'metaverse'. As mixed reality comes into its own, these are the best headsets for an immersive experience. As with any transaction of this size (more than double the company's $26.2 billion purchase of LinkedIn), there are plenty of big questions that need to be answered.


Microsoft buys Activision Blizzard in cash deal for $68.7 billion

Boston Herald

Microsoft is buying the gaming company Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion, gaining access to blockbuster games like "Call of Duty" and "Candy Crush." The all-cash deal will let Microsoft, maker of the Xbox gaming system, accelerate mobile gaming and provide building blocks for the metaverse, or a virtual environment. The announcement Tuesday arrives with Activision still in turmoil over allegations of misconduct and unequal pay. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said in a conference call with investors "the culture of our organization is my number one priority" and that "it's critical for Activision Blizzard to drive forward on its" commitments to improve its workplace culture. Activision disclosed last year it was being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission over complaints of workplace discrimination.


Microsoft Buys 'Call of Duty' and 'Candy Crush' Maker For $68.7 Billion

TIME - Tech

Microsoft is buying the gaming company Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion, gaining access to blockbuster games like "Call of Duty" and "Candy Crush." The all-cash deal will let Microsoft, maker of the Xbox gaming system, accelerate mobile gaming and provide building blocks for the metaverse, or a virtual environment. The announcement Tuesday arrives with Activision still in turmoil over allegations of misconduct and unequal pay. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said in a conference call with investors "the culture of our organization is my number one priority" and that "it's critical for Activision Blizzard to drive forward on its" commitments to improve its workplace culture. Activision disclosed last year it was being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission over complaints of workplace discrimination.