Goto

Collaborating Authors

Google Is Close To Achieving True Artificial Intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

DeepMind, a Google-owned British company, might be on the verge of creating human-level artificial intelligence. The revelation was made by the company's lead researcher Dr. Nando de Freitas in response to The Next Web columnist Tristan Greene who claimed humans will never achieve AGI. For anyone who doesn't know, AGI refers to a machine or program that can understand or learn any intellectual task that humans can. It can also do so without training. Addressing the somewhat pessimistic op-ed, and the decades-long quest to develop artificial general intelligence, Dr de Freitas said the game is over.


Google's AI team reveal work on 'big red button' to switch off systems

#artificialintelligence

Google's secretive AI division is working on a'big red button' that can halt its artificial intelligence software. Researchers have previously warned that AI could threaten humanity, with doomsday scenarios of AIs taking over, with one expert involved in the new paper admitting Google's historic win over Go world champion proves AI can be'unpredictable and immoral'. Now the DeepMind team say they have the answer - an off switch. Google's DeepMind team say AI agents are'unlikely to behave optimally all the time' and have called for'safe interruptibility' to be built into systems. Google has set up an ethics board to oversee its work in artificial intelligence.


Google's AI team is developing 'big red button' to switch off systems if they pose a threat

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google's secretive AI division is working on a'big red button' that can halt its artificial intelligence software. Researchers have previously warned that AI could threaten humanity, with doomsday scenarios of AIs taking over, with one expert involved in the new paper admitting Google's historic win over Go world champion proves AI can be'unpredictable and immoral'. Now the DeepMind team say they have the answer - an off switch. Google's DeepMind team say AI agents are'unlikely to behave optimally all the time' and have called for'safe interruptibility' to be built into systems. Google has set up an ethics board to oversee its work in artificial intelligence.


Google-owned DeepMind cracks 50-year-old 'protein folding problem'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

DeepMind, the British artificial intelligence (AI) company owned by Google, has solved a 50-year-old problem in biology. DeepMind's AI system, AlphaFold, cracked the so-called'protein folding problem' – figuring out how a protein's amino acid sequence dictates its 3D atomic structure. A protein's structure is closely linked with its function, and the ability to predict its structure unlocks a greater understanding of what it does and how it works. AlphaFold's neural network was trained with 170,000 known protein sequences and their different structures. The system registered an average accuracy score of 92.4 out of 100 for predicting protein structure, and a score of 87 in the category for most challenging proteins. Because almost all diseases, including cancer and Covid-19, are related to a protein's 3D structure, the AI could pave the way for faster development of treatments and drug discoveries by determining the structure of previously-unknown proteins.


Former schoolboy chess prodigy used AI to open door to finding cures for illnesses

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As DeepMind, the British artificial intelligence (AI) firm owned by Google, claims to have solved one of science's toughest and most enduring mysteries, the'protein folding problem', you can't help but think what sort of genius must be the driving forced behind such a triumph. 'Thrilled to announce our first major breakthrough in applying AI to a grand challenge in science,' writes Demis Hassabis, the company's 44-year-old founder says in reaction to the news. But was it really a surprise that Hassabis' firm had achieved such a feat? Thirty years ago, Hassabis was the world's second best 12-year-old chess player, his career as a future grandmaster set out before him. 'Thrilled to announce our first major breakthrough in applying AI to a grand challenge in science,' writes Demis Hassabis, the company's 44-year-old founder says in reaction to the news But while he loved the game and what it taught him about his own thought processes that brought such success, the youngster realised the game of chess was not what actually interested him. 'It got me into thinking about the process of thought: what is intelligence, how is my brain coming up with these ideas?' Hassabis finished his A-levels at 15, and although he was accepted into Cambridge he would have to wait until he was old enough to enrol.