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Elon Musk's Neuralink rival Synchron begins human trials of brain implant

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Elon Musk's Neuralink rival Synchron has begun human trials of its brain implant that lets the wearer control a computer using thought alone. The firm's Stentrode brain implant, about the size of a paperclip, will be implanted in six patients in New York and Pittsburgh who have severe paralysis. Stentrode will let patients control digital devices just by thinking and give them back the ability to perform daily tasks, including texting, emailing and shopping online. Although the implant has already been implanted and tested in Australian patients, the new clinical trial marks the first time it will be tested in the US. If successful, the Stentrode brain implant could be sold as a commercial product aimed at paralysis patients to regain their independence and quality of life.


Elon Musk Debuts Neuralink's Brain Computer Interface in Real-Time

#artificialintelligence

Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's most secretive company -- debuted "a working Neuralink device" in the firm's first public event since July 2019, according to a tweet from Musk. The event showcased the Link device installation, how a living animal (in this case, a pig) can function normally after having one removed, and the kind of data collected via a Neuralink device. The event was scheduled for August 28, at 6:00 PM EDT, and streamed live from Neuralink's YouTube page at roughly 6:40 PM EDT. All of the Neuralink V.0.9's 1,024 channels are capable of recording and stimulating. There is compression and extraction of signal that happens much faster than the speed of the brain in terms of signal resolution.


New York company gets jump on Elon Musk's Neuralink with brain-computer interface in clinical trials

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Elon Musk might be well positioned in space travel and electric vehicles, but the world's second-richest person is taking a backseat when it comes to a brain-computer interface (BCI). New York-based Synchron announced Wednesday that it has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to begin clinical trials of its Stentrode motor neuroprosthesis - a brain implant it is hoped could ultimately be used to cure paralysis. The FDA approved Synchron's Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application, according to a release, paving the way for an early feasibility study of Stentrode to begin later this year at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital. New York-based Synchron announced Wednesday that it has received FDA approval to begin clinical trials of Stentrode, its brain-computer interface, beating Elon Musk's Neuralink to a crucial benchmark. The study will analyze the safety and efficacy of the device, smaller than a matchstick, in six patients with severe paralysis. Meanwhile, Musk has been touting Neuralink, his brain-implant startup, for several years--most recently showing a video of a monkey with the chip playing Pong using only signals from its brain.


Elon Musk claims his mysterious brain chip will allow people to hear previously impossible sounds

The Independent - Tech

Elon Musk has revealed more details about his mysterious brain-computer interface startup, claiming it will allow people to hear sounds that were previously beyond their range. Neuralink's brain chip technology could also help restore movement to someone with a fully severed spinal cord, according to Musk. The SpaceX and Tesla boss founded Neuralink in 2016 but has only held one major public presentation about how its technology will actually work. The ultimate aim is to provide a direct connection between a brain and a computer, using a "sewing machine-like" device to stitch threads to an implanted brain chip. A research paper published last year in conjunction with the event explained how these threads would connect to a single USB-C cable to provide "full-bandwidth data streaming" to the brain.


Brain device records activity in record-breaking detail

The Independent - Tech

Researchers have built a sensor capable of recording signals from the human brain in record-breaking detail, opening up new possibilities for brain-computer interfaces. A team of engineers and surgeons, led by University of California San Diego professor Shadi Dayeh, used a densely packed grid embedded with thousands of electrocorticography (EC0G) sensors to allow them to read activity from the brain's cortex in 100 times higher resolution than existing technologies. Early applications could include surgeons receiving ultra clear brain signal information, providing better guidance for removing tumours without damaging healthy tissue, as well as surgically treating drug-resistant epilepsy. Longer-term, the brain device could be used as a permanent wireless implant to assist people living with paralysis or other neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's, which can be treated with electrical stimulation. Beyond that, the ECoG technology could be developed for use in the emerging field of brain-computer interfaces, which have a huge range of potential applications – from controlling a computer just by thinking, to streaming music directly to your brain.