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The $80 Trillion World Economy in One Chart

#artificialintelligence

The latest estimate from the World Bank puts global GDP at roughly $80 trillion in nominal terms for 2017. Today's chart from HowMuch.net uses this data to show all major economies in a visualization called a Voronoi diagram โ€“ let's dive into the stats to learn more. Here are the world's top 10 economies, which together combine for a whopping two-thirds of global GDP. In nominal terms, the U.S. still has the largest GDP at $19.4 trillion, making up 24.4% of the world economy. While China's economy is far behind in nominal terms at $12.2 trillion, you may recall that the Chinese economy has been the world's largest when adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP) since 2016.


Reality Check: How does China-UK trade compare globally?

BBC News

The UK prime minister and the Chinese Premier have agreed on a new trade and investment review, seen as a stepping stone to a full free trade agreement after Brexit.


Increase in UK Google searches for home workouts, deliveries and recipes during coronavirus lockdown

Daily Mail - Science & tech

There has been a massive increase in UK Google searches for'home workouts', 'fish and chips deliveries' and'baking recipes' during the coronavirus lockdown. However, the use of search terms like'get a divorce', 'condoms', 'botox' and'prom dress' have all fallen radically since people began staying at home. The findings highlight how lockdown and social distancing measures are having a marked effect on the way we live our lives in the time of COVID-19. There has been a massive increase in UK Google searches for'home workouts', 'fish and chips deliveries' and'baking recipes' during the coronavirus lockdown. However, the use of search terms like'get a divorce', 'condoms', 'botox' and'prom dress' have all fallen radically The study -- which examined search terms used between January 18 and April 15, 2020 -- was conducting by the Reboot Online Marketing Agency.


Self-driving truck convoy makes first cross-border trip

#artificialintelligence

A convoy of nearly a dozen self-driving trucks has arrived safely in Rotterdam following a cross-border European test run, in one of the first major steps towards future automated trucking. The self-driving truck convoy was part of one of the largest convoys of these semi-automated trucks being tested by a consortium of some of the largest European truck producers, including DAF, Daimler, Iveco, MAN, Scania and Volvo. According to The Guardian, the truck convoy arrived in what are being called'truck platoons', which consist of groupings of between two and three trucks. Within the truck platoon, the three individual vehicles were connected via a wireless signal, with one truck leading and the others following suit in terms of the route the lead is taking, as well as speed. President of the group representing the manufacturers, Eric Jonnaert, said that the concept of truck platoons for self-driving trucks driving at the same speed would have a considerable benefit in terms of reducing traffic on motorways.


Anglican church in Carmichael mine heartland to divest from fossil fuels

The Guardian > Energy

The Anglican church in Australia's largest coalmining region, including the site of Adani's proposed Carmichael mine, has vowed to renounce interests in fossil fuels. The Anglican diocese of Rockhampton, which includes central Queensland mining and gas towns across 20 parishes โ€“ the largest of which is bigger than Victoria โ€“ voted to divest from the likes of thermal coal and coal seam gas at a synod meeting on 20 May. A group of about 70 priests and church representatives passed two motions committing the church to ethical investments, a criteria which puts fossil fuels in the same category as arms dealing, tobacco, alcohol and gambling, wage exploitation and pornography. That position likely leaves scope to retain interests in coking coal for steel but focuses on renewables for energy investments. Lindsay Howie, the dean of St Paul's cathedral in Rockhampton, said the diocese's investments were "pretty much bugger all compared to the rest of the world".