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Creepy facial-recognition search engine tracks down a person's photos online

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A Polish website called PimEyes uses facial recognition to search the internet for pictures of a person based on a single image. That photo can be taken from a news site, social media, or an uploaded selfie, and the computer algorithm then shows matches on the web. The free part of service shows photos it believes to be the same person, and rates the'match' out of five stars. It provides a generic name of the site where the picture is found (i.e. For that added insight, it offers a premium service for £9.79 a day where customers can see exactly where the photo comes from.


Facial Recognition Software Triggers Ethical Concerns

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

MOSCOW--When Russian clubgoers flocked to the country's biggest electronic music festival this summer, they didn't have to bring a camera or even their phones. Instead, festival organizers used facial-identification technology to pick out revelers and send them their pictures directly to their phone. All they needed to do was opt in, by sending a selfie. The technology is the product of NTechLab, a Moscow-based firm whose algorithm to identify facial features is getting attention in the broader information technology world. NTechLab co-founders Artem Kukharenko and Alexander Kabakov believe the possible uses of their technology are almost endless, and mostly positive: from allowing police to search for criminals in real time, to helping amusement parks identify and sell photos to their guests.


Facial recognition website PimEyes searches 900M photos to find people online with scary accuracy

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Despite the controversy surrounding Polish-based facial recognition software PimEyes, an extensive test of the search engine shows that it has trouble identifying ordinary people. Of the more than 25 searches performed by DailyMail.com, Journalists and celebrities seemed to be fairly accurate, but only 26 percent of results were entirely accurate for the average person. However, this is why security experts deem PimEyes a'serious security risk' - the site provides information to social media accounts. Some of the matches included URL's to the individual's Instagram, TikTok, Tumblr and Facebook, along with personal blogs.


PimEyes searches 900M photos to find people online with scary accuracy

#artificialintelligence

Despite the controversy surrounding Polish-based facial recognition software PimEyes, an extensive test of the search engine shows that it has trouble identifying ordinary people. Of the more than 25 searches performed by DailyMail.com, Journalists and celebrities seemed to be fairly accurate, but only 25 percent of results were entirely accurate for the average person. However, this is why security experts deem PimEyes a'serious security risk' - the site provides information to social media accounts. Some of the matches included URL's to the individual's Instagram, TikTok, Tumblr and Facebook, along with personal blogs.


An Incredibly Accurate Facial Recognition App Is Coming -- Here's What It Means for Privacy

#artificialintelligence

That's the conviction held by Russian entrepreneurs Artem Kukharenko and Alexander Kabakov, whose startup, NTechLab, recently launched a facial recognition app that nearly obliterates the concept of anonymity. Called FindFace, the app has remained exclusive to Russia since going live earlier this year. Soon, though, Kuhkarenko and Kabakov are introducing a cloud-based platform that makes their frighteningly accurate algorithm available to everyone, the pair said in a Skype interview in May. In a practical sense, what this means is that none of us is safe from an always-probing public eye. "In 10 or 20 years, there won't be a place on the earth [where] ... nobody [can] see you," Kabakov said over Skype.