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On a Connection between Importance Sampling and the Likelihood Ratio Policy Gradient

Neural Information Processing Systems

Likelihood ratio policy gradient methods have been some of the most successful reinforcement learning algorithms, especially for learning on physical systems. We describe how the likelihood ratio policy gradient can be derived from an importance sampling perspective. This derivation highlights how likelihood ratio methods under-use past experience by (a) using the past experience to estimate {\em only} the gradient of the expected return $U(\theta)$ at the current policy parameterization $\theta$, rather than to obtain a more complete estimate of $U(\theta)$, and (b) using past experience under the current policy {\em only} rather than using all past experience to improve the estimates. We present a new policy search method, which leverages both of these observations as well as generalized baselines---a new technique which generalizes commonly used baseline techniques for policy gradient methods. Our algorithm outperforms standard likelihood ratio policy gradient algorithms on several testbeds.


Expected Policy Gradients

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose expected policy gradients (EPG), which unify stochastic policy gradients (SPG) and deterministic policy gradients (DPG) for reinforcement learning. Inspired by expected sarsa, EPG integrates across the action when estimating the gradient, instead of relying only on the action in the sampled trajectory. We establish a new general policy gradient theorem, of which the stochastic and deterministic policy gradient theorems are special cases. We also prove that EPG reduces the variance of the gradient estimates without requiring deterministic policies and, for the Gaussian case, with no computational overhead. Finally, we show that it is optimal in a certain sense to explore with a Gaussian policy such that the covariance is proportional to the exponential of the scaled Hessian of the critic with respect to the actions. We present empirical results confirming that this new form of exploration substantially outperforms DPG with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck heuristic in four challenging MuJoCo domains.


Adaptive Step-Size for Policy Gradient Methods

Neural Information Processing Systems

In the last decade, policy gradient methods have significantly grown in popularity in the reinforcement--learning field. In particular, they have been largely employed in motor control and robotic applications, thanks to their ability to cope with continuous state and action domains and partial observable problems. Policy gradient researches have been mainly focused on the identification of effective gradient directions and the proposal of efficient estimation algorithms. Nonetheless, the performance of policy gradient methods is determined not only by the gradient direction, since convergence properties are strongly influenced by the choice of the step size: small values imply slow convergence rate, while large values may lead to oscillations or even divergence of the policy parameters. Step--size value is usually chosen by hand tuning and still little attention has been paid to its automatic selection. In this paper, we propose to determine the learning rate by maximizing a lower bound to the expected performance gain. Focusing on Gaussian policies, we derive a lower bound that is second--order polynomial of the step size, and we show how a simplified version of such lower bound can be maximized when the gradient is estimated from trajectory samples. The properties of the proposed approach are empirically evaluated in a linear--quadratic regulator problem.


An Off-policy Policy Gradient Theorem Using Emphatic Weightings

Neural Information Processing Systems

Policy gradient methods are widely used for control in reinforcement learning, particularly for the continuous action setting. There have been a host of theoretically sound algorithms proposed for the on-policy setting, due to the existence of the policy gradient theorem which provides a simplified form for the gradient. In off-policy learning, however, where the behaviour policy is not necessarily attempting to learn and follow the optimal policy for the given task, the existence of such a theorem has been elusive. In this work, we solve this open problem by providing the first off-policy policy gradient theorem. The key to the derivation is the use of emphatic weightings.


Expected Policy Gradients

AAAI Conferences

We propose expected policy gradients (EPG), which unify stochastic policy gradients (SPG) and deterministic policy gradients (DPG) for reinforcement learning. Inspired by expected sarsa, EPG integrates across the action when estimating the gradient, instead of relying only on the action in the sampled trajectory. We establish a new general policy gradient theorem, of which the stochastic and deterministic policy gradient theorems are special cases. We also prove that EPG reduces the variance of the gradient estimates without requiring deterministic policies and, for the Gaussian case, with no computational overhead. Finally, we show that it is optimal in a certain sense to explore with a Gaussian policy such that the covariance is proportional to the exponential of the scaled Hessian of the critic with respect to the actions. We present empirical results confirming that this new form of exploration substantially outperforms DPG with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck heuristic in four challenging MuJoCo domains.