Causal Inference through a Witness Protection Program

arXiv.org Machine Learning

One of the most fundamental problems in causal inference is the estimation of a causal effect when variables are confounded. This is difficult in an observational study, because one has no direct evidence that all confounders have been adjusted for. We introduce a novel approach for estimating causal effects that exploits observational conditional independencies to suggest "weak" paths in a unknown causal graph. The widely used faithfulness condition of Spirtes et al. is relaxed to allow for varying degrees of "path cancellations" that imply conditional independencies but do not rule out the existence of confounding causal paths. The outcome is a posterior distribution over bounds on the average causal effect via a linear programming approach and Bayesian inference. We claim this approach should be used in regular practice along with other default tools in observational studies.


PAC-Bayes Learning of Conjunctions and Classification of Gene-Expression Data

Neural Information Processing Systems

We propose a "soft greedy" learning algorithm for building small conjunctions of simple threshold functions, called rays, defined on single real-valued attributes. We also propose a PAC-Bayes risk bound which is minimized for classifiers achieving a nontrivial tradeoff between sparsity (the number of rays used) and the magnitude ofthe separating margin of each ray. Finally, we test the soft greedy algorithm on four DNA micro-array data sets.


Stable specification search in structural equation model with latent variables

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In our previous study, we introduced stable specification search for cross-sectional data (S3C). It is an exploratory causal method that combines stability selection concept and multi-objective optimization to search for stable and parsimonious causal structures across the entire range of model complexities. In this study, we extended S3C to S3C-Latent, to model causal relations between latent variables. We evaluated S3C-Latent on simulated data and compared the results to those of PC-MIMBuild, an extension of the PC algorithm, the state-of-the-art causal discovery method. The comparison showed that S3C-Latent achieved better performance. We also applied S3C-Latent to real-world data of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and data about measuring mental abilities among pupils. The results are consistent with those of previous studies.


IBM Watson aligns with 16 health systems and imaging firms to apply cognitive computing to battle cancer, diabetes, heart disease

#artificialintelligence

IBM Watson Health has formed a medical imaging collaborative with more than 15 leading healthcare organizations. The goal: To take on some of the most deadly diseases. The collaborative, which includes health systems, academic medical centers, ambulatory radiology providers and imaging technology companies, aims to help doctors address breast, lung, and other cancers; diabetes; eye health; brain disease; and heart disease and related conditions, such as stroke. Watson will mine insights from what IBM calls previously invisible unstructured imaging data and combine it with a broad variety of data from other sources, such as data from electronic health records, radiology and pathology reports, lab results, doctors' progress notes, medical journals, clinical care guidelines and published outcomes studies. As the work of the collaborative evolves, Watson's rationale and insights will evolve, informed by the latest combined thinking of the participating organizations.


Conditional Hierarchical Bayesian Tucker Decomposition

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Our research focuses on studying and developing methods for reducing the dimensionality of large datasets, common in biomedical applications. A major problem when learning information about patients based on genetic sequencing data is that there are often more feature variables (genetic data) than observations (patients). This makes direct supervised learning difficult. One way of reducing the feature space is to use latent Dirichlet allocation in order to group genetic variants in an unsupervised manner. Latent Dirichlet allocation is a common model in natural language processing, which describes a document as a mixture of topics, each with a probability of generating certain words. This can be generalized as a Bayesian tensor decomposition to account for multiple feature variables. While we made some progress improving and modifying these methods, our significant contributions are with hierarchical topic modeling. We developed distinct methods of incorporating hierarchical topic modeling, based on nested Chinese restaurant processes and Pachinko Allocation Machine, into Bayesian tensor decompositions. We apply these models to predict whether or not patients have autism spectrum disorder based on genetic sequencing data. We examine a dataset from National Database for Autism Research consisting of paired siblings -- one with autism, and the other without -- and counts of their genetic variants. Additionally, we linked the genes with their Reactome biological pathways. We combine this information into a tensor of patients, counts of their genetic variants, and the membership of these genes in pathways. Once we decompose this tensor, we use logistic regression on the reduced features in order to predict if patients have autism. We also perform a similar analysis of a dataset of patients with one of four common types of cancer (breast, lung, prostate, and colorectal).