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'Doom' unleashes hell with a new arcade mode

Engadget

If you've shotgunned and boot-stomped your way through the new Doom campaign (and if you haven't yet, you should) fear not: Bethesda has plenty more demon hunting ready to go. The developer released "Free Update 4" this week, which comes with a nifty arcade mode. Every gun, suit and "Rune" upgrade is unlocked from the start, giving you the best possible edge in the battlefield. The aim is to blitz through the "streamlined" game in the shortest time possible, avoiding enemy attacks and racking up multipliers. Points are rewarded for butt-kicking your opponents, leading to a final score that you can compare with friends.


Daytona USA: why the best arcade racing game ever just won't go away

The Guardian

If you were to set foot inside the Heart of Gaming, a densely packed treasure trove of classic and modern arcade games in Croydon, there is one cabinet you'd almost certainly have to queue to play on. Featuring chunkily texture-mapped stock cars, snaking between each other on swooping circuits below an azure blue sky, Daytona USA, is one of the greatest driving games ever made. Released in 1993, and available in a variety of cabinets from basic standing model to full-on deluxe recreation of the player's 41 Hornet car, Sega's masterpiece always pulls a crowd. The game can still be found in public places all over the UK and beyond, while myriad ports have made their way to everything from Dreamcast to PlayStation 3. The reason why this grunting, knockabout NASCAR sim still thrives, and the reason the third new cabinet-based game in the series is now gradually making it to arcades globally, is rather intangible. In a genre where innovation and individuality are arguably stifled by game design conventions, Daytona USA stands out as truly special, even amid Sega's own crowded starting grid of genre-defining racers.


8BitDo is making a customizable arcade stick for Switch and PC players

Engadget

It's time to fight with style. The peripheral, which supports PC and Switch, has a bunch of customisation options to suit different players. It has a "universal mounting plate," for instance, so fighting game enthusiasts can swap in sticks and buttons made by other manufacturers. It also supports 8BitDo's Ultimate Software so that, unlike the company's old N30 arcade stick, you can change the button mapping, save custom profiles, and execute macros with the P1 and P2 options in the top right-hand corner. You can connect the stick over Bluetooth, a USB-C cable, or a wireless 2.4G receiver that's cleverly stored on the underside of the stick.


Here's a $20 arcade cabinet made of cardboard and a Switch

Engadget

Where Nintendo goes, others follow. Off the back of Nintendo's popular Labo cardboard kits, accessory maker Nyko has concocted its own cardboard creation -- the PixelQuest Arcade Kit. Like Labo, it comes flat-packed as cardboard sheets. Where it differs is that the Arcade Kit doesn't come with any software. It's instead meant to act as a miniature arcade cabinet for games that support play on a single Joy-Con.


Tsunami-hit Minamisanriku gets Kuma-designed shopping center

The Japan Times

SENDAI – A new shopping center opened Friday on elevated land in Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, providing shops that had been operating out of temporary premises new footing in the tsunami-wiped town. Marking a new phase in the town's reconstruction, 28 shops opened at Minamisanriku Sun Sun Shopping Village in six wooden buildings designed by Kengo Kuma, the famed architect behind the new National Stadium to be used in the 2020 Olympics. The shops include restaurants serving fresh local seafood, a hair salon and souvenir shops. Of the 32 business that were in the temporary shopping center, 23 moved into Sun Sun Shopping Village with five other businesses. Floral wreaths and colorful banners were placed in front of each shop on opening day.