Ex-Googler Sebastian Thrun says the going rate for self-driving talent is 10 million per person

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When Sebastian Thrun started working on self-driving cars at Google in 2007, few people outside of the company took him seriously. "I can tell you very senior CEOs of major American car companies would shake my hand and turn away because I wasn't worth talking to," said Thrun, now the co-founder and CEO of online higher education startup Udacity, in an interview with Recode earlier this week. A little less than a decade later, dozens of self-driving startups have cropped up while automakers around the world clamor, wallet in hand, to secure their place in the fast-moving world of fully automated transportation. And these companies are hungry for talent and skill sets many don't have. "Uber has just bought a half-a-year-old company [Otto] with 70 employees for almost 700 million," Thrun said.


You now can get a degree in ... self-driving cars

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Tech columnist Jennifer Jolly takes a spin in a self-driving Ford Fusion and gets the scoop on how the technology works. Mercedes-Benz, whose engineers have been working on self-driving car technology, is eager to increase the size of its engineering team both in Silicon Valley and in Germany. SAN FRANCISCO -- So you say you want join the automotive revolution? Over the past few years, only elite roboticists have been positioned to heed the self-driving car's call to action. Armed with degrees from places such as Carnegie Mellon University and experience at institutions such as NASA, these tech whizzes have been highly sought after by technology and automotive companies looking to build the future.


Your ride to a self-driving car tech job just pulled up

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Mercedes-Benz, whose engineers have been working on self-driving car technology, is eager to increase the size of its engineering team both in Silicon Valley and in Germany. SAN FRANCISCO - So you say you want join the automotive revolution? Over the past few years, only elite roboticists have been positioned to heed the self-driving car's call to action. Armed with degrees from places such as Carnegie Mellon University and experience at institutions such as NASA, these tech titans have been highly sought after by technology and automotive companies looking to build the future. But now massive open online course pioneer Udacity has a proposition: Give the Web-based education outfit 36 weeks and 2,400, and they'll turn graduates onto jobs at autonomous-car partner companies Mercedes-Benz, Didi Chuxing, Nvidia and Otto.


Udacity launches self-driving car nanodegree

ZDNet

The online education company Udacity is partnering with major companies in the field of autonomous vehicles to launch a nanodegree program for those interested in becoming a self-driving car engineer. "It is the first and only program of its kind where most people with an internet connection--from Detroit to Damascus and from Adelaide to Aleppo--can learn the skills they need to work in one of the most amazing fields of our time," Udacity founder and president Sebastian Thrun wrote in a blog post. The course, which spans three 12-week terms, covers deep learning, computer vision, sensor fusion, localization and controllers. Four major partners have committed to fast-tracking the nanodegree graduates into positions around the world: Mercedes-Benz, Nvidia, Otto (recently acquired by Uber) and Didi Chuxing. Thrun promised that more partners will be added to that list.


Self-Driving Car 'Godfather' To Help Lyft Get Engineers, Offer Flying Car Classes

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Night driving in an autonomous vehicle designed by Udacity, an online training service that specializes in high-tech vocations. Sebastian Thrun, the original leader of Google's self-driving car project, is going to help rideshare company Lyft staff up its autonomous vehicle team with training through Udacity, his high-tech vocational service. And if robot cars weren't enough, he's creating the first academic program for those wanting to design so-called flying cars. Lyft will sponsor 400 scholarships over the next year for qualified candidates to complete Udacity's online self-driving car "nanodegree" program, which certifies them to work with companies struggling to find engineering talent in that field. Along with finding people for its new Level 5 Engineering Center, Lyft wants the scholarships help attract a more diverse range of people to work on autonomous vehicles, said Chief Strategy Officer Raj Kapoor.