Dubai CCTV cameras to use AI, face recognition

#artificialintelligence

Dubai: Thousands of CCTV cameras of various Dubai government agencies will now provide live feed to a central command centre, officials said. Under a new Artificial Intelligence (AI) network, security cameras across will relay live images of security breaches live to the central command centre, Dubai Police said. The cameras will monitor criminal behaviour in three sectors -- tourism, traffic and bricks and mortar facilities. The network, said the police, is being phased in via different stages to meet the Dubai 2021 Vision requirements of a smart city. Announcing the programme, Major-General Khalil Ebrahim Al Mansouri, Assistant Commander-in-Chief for Criminal Investigation Affairs, said the new project called'Oyoon' (eyes) will tackle crimes in the city and help reduce traffic accident deaths and congestion.


Russia launches facial recognition programme to find anyone's face on Twitter

The Independent - Tech

A Russian company has launched a programme that can identify a stranger among 300 million Twitter users in less than a second. The social media platform has responded to the new software, called "FindFace", saying it its use is in "violation" of its rules and it is taking the matter "very seriously". Trump'obviously aware' Russia behind election hacks, White House says Syria's Assad says Donald Trump will be Russia's'natural ally' Trump'obviously aware' Russia behind election hacks, White House says Syria's Assad says Donald Trump will be Russia's'natural ally' "We see lots of opportunities for Twitter users on the service," Artem Kukharenko, co-founder of NTechLab told BuzzFeed. "We think this is something many people will use," he added, claiming the technology could be used to reduce spam profiles. "Not in the US, but in other countries there is a real problem of politicians, reporters, finding that someone created a fake account for them.


Facial Recognition Tech Is Creepy When It Works--And Creepier When It Doesn't

WIRED

For the last few years, police forces around China have invested heavily to build the world's largest video surveillance and facial recognition system, incorporating more than 170 million cameras so far. In a December test of the dragnet in Guiyang, a city of 4.3 million people in southwest China, a BBC reporter was flagged for arrest within seven minutes of police adding his headshot to a facial recognition database. And in the southeast city of Nanchang, Chinese police say that last month they arrested a suspect wanted for "economic crimes" after a facial recognition system spotted him at a pop concert amidst 60,000 other attendees. These types of stories, combined with reports that computer vision recognizes some types of images more accurately than humans, makes it seem like the Panopticon has officially arrived. In the US alone, 117 million Americans, or roughly one in two US adults, have their picture in a law enforcement facial-recognition database.


Facial recognition technology: What would George Orwell say?

The Japan Times

This coming June, British author George Orwell's dystopian novel, "Nineteen Eighty-Four," marks the 70th anniversary of its publication. In the United States, Penguin has announced plans for a special 75,000-copy reprint. According to The New York Times, the publisher noted that, sales of the novel have increased by 9,500 percent since the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump. Demonstrating remarkable foresight, Orwell envisaged a terrifying future in which a "Big Brother" government would harness tools to watch each and every one of us. When Winston Smith, the book's protagonist, wanted to meet his illicit lover, he was forced to take extreme measures to avoid a two-way device called a "telescreen," described as follows: "The telescreen received and transmitted simultaneously. Any sound that Winston made, above the level of a very low whisper, would be picked up by it, moreover, so long as he remained within the field of vision which the metal plaque commanded, he could be seen as well as heard."


A Facebook Crackdown, Amazon Facial Recognition, and More Security News This Week

WIRED

As happens infrequently--but definitely not never--Apple wrestled with an embarrassing and problematic security bug this week in its iOS FaceTime group calling feature. The flaw was bad enough that Apple took the drastic step of pulling group FaceTime functionality altogether. A full fix will come next week. Meanwhile, Facebook faced criticism for paying users as young as 13 to download a mobile research app that gave the company invasive access to all sorts of user data and activity, including web browsing. The app didn't meet Apple's privacy standards for iOS, and Facebook was distributing it through a loophole in the platform.