How much all-seeing AI surveillance is too much?

Daily Mail - Science & tech

When a CIA-backed venture capital fund took an interest in Rana el Kaliouby's face-scanning technology for detecting emotions, the computer scientist and her colleagues did some soul-searching - and then turned down the money. 'We're not interested in applications where you're spying on people,' said el Kaliouby, the CEO and co-founder of the Boston startup Affectiva. The company has trained its artificial intelligence systems to recognize if individuals are happy or sad, tired or angry, using a photographic repository of more than 6 million faces. Rana el Kaliouby, CEO of Affectiva, demonstrates their facial recognition technology. Recent advances in AI-powered computer vision have accelerated the race for self-driving cars and powered the increasingly sophisticated photo-tagging features found on Facebook and Google.


Police in Washington are running sketches through Amazon's facial recognition software

Daily Mail - Science & tech

In a previously undocumented use of facial recognition software, police in Washington state are using Amazon's'Rekognition' to track down criminals with as little as an artist's sketch. According to a report from The Washington Post, police in Washington County are able to compare pictures of suspects harvested from security cameras and eye-witness' cell phone pictures against databases containing 300,000 mugshots of known criminals. In just Washington County Police Department alone, the report states more than 1,000 facial scans were logged last year which have helped identify subjects, sometimes leading officers to home arrests. Amazon's facial recognition software is being used to process criminal sketches in an unprecedented deployment of the technology in law enforcement. While law enforcement say the software has been a critical tool in expediting investigations and tracking down otherwise elusive criminals, skeptics say the use of facial recognition opens up a proverbial Pandora's Box of mass surveillance that could lead to more false identifications.


ICE Uses Facial Recognition To Sift State Driver's License Records, Researchers Say

NPR Technology

In many cases, federal agents can request access to state DMV records by filling out a form. This is an example of a Homeland Security request that was made to the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 2017. In many cases, federal agents can request access to state DMV records by filling out a form. This is an example of a Homeland Security request that was made to the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 2017. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents mine millions of driver's license photos for possible facial recognition matches -- and some of those efforts target undocumented immigrants who have legally obtained driver's licenses, according to researchers at Georgetown University Law Center, which obtained documents related to the searches.


How powerful is North Korea's military?

PBS NewsHour

North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un observes a target-striking contest by the Korean People's Army (KPA) in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on April 13, 2017. North Korea has embarked on an accelerated buildup of weapons of mass destruction and modernization of its already large conventional force. The United States and its Asian allies regard North Korea as a grave security threat. It has one of the world's largest conventional military forces, which, combined with its escalating missile and nuclear tests and aggressive rhetoric, has aroused concern worldwide. But world powers have been ineffective in slowing its path to acquire nuclear weapons.


South Korean Banks Reject iPhone X Face ID Over Security Concerns

International Business Times

Looks like iPhone X users in South Korea won't be able to use the smartphone's Face ID technology when doing transactions in local banks. Apparently, Korean banks have rejected the idea of providing support for the 10th anniversary iPhone's advanced biometric system. The banks' decision reportedly comes after Face ID security concerns were reported.