Real-life RoboCop was at the scene of a crime. Then it moved on.

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When a fight broke out recently in the parking lot of Salt Lake Park, a few miles south of downtown Los Angeles, Cogo Guebara did what seemed the most practical thing at the time: she ran over to the park's police robot to push its emergency alert button. "I was pushing the button but it said, 'step out of the way,'" Guebara said. "It just kept ringing and ringing, and I kept pushing and pushing." She thought maybe the robot, which stands about 5 feet tall and has "POLICE" emblazoned on its egg-shaped body, wanted a visual of her face, so she crouched down for the camera. Without a response, Rudy Espericuta, who was with Guebara and her children at the time, dialed 911.


Police Robot calls manufacturer instead of police officers -- Z6 Mag

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The Huntingdon Park police near Los Angeles has rolled out several robot police in public spaces around the city. However, reports and testimonies reveal that these autonomous police robots may not serve any purpose at all. The inefficiency of the supposed virtual police that secure the parks in Los Angeles (instead of actual human police officers) was highlighted when the Knightscope police robot ignored a distressed woman. A woman in a park near Los Angeles attempted to summon the futuristic police robot when a fight broke out in the area. Instead of responding to the distress call of the woman, the K5 model named "HP RoboCop," ignored her report and told her to "step out of the way," as earlier reported in NBC News.


Is the new officer policing your local beat actually a robot?

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Give us your feedback, and we'll help you learn more about where and how police security robots are being used This summer, the police department in Huntington Park, California debuted the newest member of its squad: A 400 pound autonomous robot developed by Knightscope Inc. The sleek "RoboCop" has gotten a fair amount of attention for its patrols of the local park, including a featured segment on NBC's "Today" show. MuckRock's JPat Brown, submitted a California Public Records Act request for materials related to the robot's use and, through a release earlier this month, found that the machine was equipped with the ability to scan and store license plate information and video footage, which it can then "analyze" for bystanders and potential criminals. MuckRock wants your help in learning more about how these machines are being used and acquired. The roving robot security guard has found employment with private companies, malls, casinos, and airports, but the use by official law enforcement is still in its earlier stages.



Man 'assaults' security robot

FOX News

A man attacked a 300-pound security robot in Mountain View, California, according to local police. A man in the Silicon Valley town has been arrested after allegedly attacking a Knightscope K5 security robot. He claimed he was trying to "test" the robot. "When we arrived, we met with Sylvain, and as we were speaking with him, he appeared confused, had red, glassy eyes and a strong odor of alcohol emitted from him," a spokeswoman for the Mountain View police department told CNET. Sylvain has been charged with being drunk in public and a Knightscope employee requested his arrest for prowling.