Inside the black box: Understanding AI decision-making ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Neural networks, machine-learning systems, predictive analytics, speech recognition, natural-language understanding and other components of what's broadly defined as'artificial intelligence' (AI) are currently undergoing a boom: research is progressing apace, media attention is at an all-time high, and organisations are increasingly implementing AI solutions in pursuit of automation-driven efficiencies. The first thing to establish is what we're not talking about, which is human-level AI -- often termed'strong AI' or'artificial general intelligence' (AGI). A survey conducted among four groups of experts in 2012/13 by AI researchers Vincent C. Müller and Nick Bostrom reported a 50 percent chance that AGI would be developed between 2040 and 2050, rising to 90 percent by 2075; so-called'superintelligence' -- which Bostrom defines as "any intellect that greatly exceeds the cognitive performance of humans in virtually all domains of interest" -- was expected some 30 years after the achievement of AGI (Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence, Chapter 33). This stuff will happen, and it certainly needs careful consideration, but it's not happening right now. What is happening right now, at an increasing pace, is the application of AI algorithms to all manner of processes that can significantly affect peoples' lives -- at work, at home and as they travel around.


Inside the black box: Understanding AI decision-making ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Neural networks, machine-learning systems, predictive analytics, speech recognition, natural-language understanding and other components of what's broadly defined as'artificial intelligence' (AI) are currently undergoing a boom: research is progressing apace, media attention is at an all-time high, and organisations are increasingly implementing AI solutions in pursuit of automation-driven efficiencies. The first thing to establish is what we're not talking about, which is human-level AI -- often termed'strong AI' or'artificial general intelligence' (AGI). A survey conducted among four groups of experts in 2012/13 by AI researchers Vincent C. Müller and Nick Bostrom reported a 50 percent chance that AGI would be developed between 2040 and 2050, rising to 90 percent by 2075; so-called'superintelligence' -- which Bostrom defines as "any intellect that greatly exceeds the cognitive performance of humans in virtually all domains of interest" -- was expected some 30 years after the achievement of AGI (Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence, Chapter 33). This stuff will happen, and it certainly needs careful consideration, but it's not happening right now. What is happening right now, at an increasing pace, is the application of AI algorithms to all manner of processes that can significantly affect peoples' lives -- at work, at home and as they travel around.


Inside the black box: Understanding AI decision-making ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Neural networks, machine-learning systems, predictive analytics, speech recognition, natural-language understanding and other components of what's broadly defined as'artificial intelligence' (AI) are currently undergoing a boom: research is progressing apace, media attention is at an all-time high, and organisations are increasingly implementing AI solutions in pursuit of automation-driven efficiencies. The first thing to establish is what we're not talking about, which is human-level AI -- often termed'strong AI' or'artificial general intelligence' (AGI). A survey conducted among four groups of experts in 2012/13 by AI researchers Vincent C. Müller and Nick Bostrom reported a 50 percent chance that AGI would be developed between 2040 and 2050, rising to 90 percent by 2075; so-called'superintelligence' -- which Bostrom defines as "any intellect that greatly exceeds the cognitive performance of humans in virtually all domains of interest" -- was expected some 30 years after the achievement of AGI (Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence, Chapter 33). This stuff will happen, and it certainly needs careful consideration, but it's not happening right now. What is happening right now, at an increasing pace, is the application of AI algorithms to all manner of processes that can significantly affect peoples' lives -- at work, at home and as they travel around.


Inside the black box: Understanding AI decision-making

ZDNet

Neural networks, machine-learning systems, predictive analytics, speech recognition, natural-language understanding and other components of what's broadly defined as'artificial intelligence' (AI) are currently undergoing a boom: research is progressing apace, media attention is at an all-time high, and organisations are increasingly implementing AI solutions in pursuit of automation-driven efficiencies. The first thing to establish is what we're not talking about, which is human-level AI -- often termed'strong AI' or'artificial general intelligence' (AGI). A survey conducted among four groups of experts in 2012/13 by AI researchers Vincent C. Müller and Nick Bostrom reported a 50 percent chance that AGI would be developed between 2040 and 2050, rising to 90 percent by 2075; so-called'superintelligence' -- which Bostrom defines as "any intellect that greatly exceeds the cognitive performance of humans in virtually all domains of interest" -- was expected some 30 years after the achievement of AGI (Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence, Chapter 33). This stuff will happen, and it certainly needs careful consideration, but it's not happening right now. What is happening right now, at an increasing pace, is the application of AI algorithms to all manner of processes that can significantly affect peoples' lives -- at work, at home and as they travel around.


Poland's Nazi gold train dig captured on drone footage

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Drone footage is offering a first look at a site where treasure hunters are digging for a buried Nazi train that could contain 250million worth of gold and other riches. With the dig gaining headlines around the world, the site in Walbrzych, Poland, has been sealed off to the prying eyes of the public, and the only way to get a glimpse of it is from high above. There is no guarantee the so-called'Nazi gold train' is buried there or even exists, but two explorers believe it is nearly 30ft below ground in a railway tunnel. Workers have set up fences and privacy screens to keep the public's prying eyes away In addition to gold and gems, Piotr Koper and Andreas Richter believe the site may have been used to hide the bodies of thousands of forced labourers. It could take up to 10 days for the site to be excavated.