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When quantum computing and AI collide

#artificialintelligence

Machine-learning and quantum computing are two technologies that have incredible potential in their own right. Now researchers are bringing them together. The main goal is to achieve a so-called quantum advantage, where complex algorithms can be calculated significantly faster than with the best classical computer. This would be a game-changer in the field of AI. Such a breakthrough could lead to new drug discoveries, advances in chemistry, as well as better data science, weather predictions and natural-language processing.


When quantum computing and AI collide

#artificialintelligence

Machine-learning and quantum computing are two technologies that have incredible potential in their own right. Now researchers are bringing them together. The main goal is to achieve a so-called quantum advantage, where complex algorithms can be calculated significantly faster than with the best classical computer. This would be a game-changer in the field of AI. Such a breakthrough could lead to new drug discoveries, advances in chemistry, as well as better data science, weather predictions and natural-language processing.


What is quantum computing? Everything you need to know about the strange world of quantum computers

ZDNet

While researchers don't understand everything about the quantum world, what they do know is that quantum particles hold immense potential, in particular to hold and process large amounts of information. What is quantum computing and how does it work? Quantum computing exploits the puzzling behavior that scientists have been observing for decades in nature's smallest particles – think atoms, photons or electrons. At this scale, the classical laws of physics ceases to apply, and instead we shift to quantum rules. While researchers don't understand everything about the quantum world, what they do know is that quantum particles hold immense potential, in particular to hold and process large amounts of information. Successfully bringing those particles under control in a quantum computer could trigger an explosion of compute power that would phenomenally advance innovation in many fields that require complex calculations, like drug discovery, climate modelling, financial optimization or logistics. As Bob Sutor, chief quantum exponent at IBM, puts it: "Quantum computing is our way of emulating nature to solve extraordinarily difficult problems and make them tractable," he tells ZDNet. What is a quantum computer?


IDG Connect How close is quantum computing?

#artificialintelligence

"That sounds like sci-fi…!" is a term that gets bandied around a lot. Yet in the case of quantum computing, the really weird thing is just how recent the whole idea is. In fact, the concept wasn't invented until the early 1980s by Nobel-prize winning physicist Richard Feynman in a paper entitled "Simulating physics with computers". And sci-fi didn't get its teeth into it until the early 1990s – although, Multivac the supercomputer in Isaac Asimov's 1956 short story "The Last Question" from 1956, does show some parallels. These days everyone is getting on the bandwagon.


Quantum computers are coming. Get ready for them to change everything

ZDNet

Supermarket aisles filled with fresh produce are probably not where you would expect to discover some of the first benefits of quantum computing. Quantum computers offer great promise for cryptography and optimization problems. ZDNet explores what quantum computers will and won't be able to do, and the challenges we still face. But Canadian grocery chain Save-On-Foods has become an unlikely pioneer, using quantum technology to improve the management of in-store logistics. In collaboration with quantum computing company D-Wave, Save-On-Foods is using a new type of computing, which is based on the downright weird behaviour of matter at the quantum level.