The £2.6m Israeli 'Drone Dome' system that the Army used to defeat the Gatwick UAV

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Army used a cutting-edge Israeli anti-drone system to defeat the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that brought misery to hundreds of thousands of people at Gatwick airport. The British Army bought six'Drone Dome' systems for £15.8 million in 2018 and the technology is used in Syria to destroy ISIS UAVs. Police had been seen on Thursday with an off-the-shelf DJI system that tracks drones made by that manufacturer and shows officers where the operator is (DJI is the most popular commercial drone brand.) However, the drone used at Gatwick is thought to have been either hacked or an advanced non-DJI drone, which rendered the commercial technology used by the police useless. At that point, the Army's'Drone Dome' system made by Rafael was called in.


Gatwick airport: How countries counter the drone threat

BBC News

Rogue drones "deliberately" flown over one of the UK's busiest airports caused travel chaos this week. Incoming planes were forced to divert to airports up and down the country as the drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), repeatedly appeared over the airfield at London's Gatwick Airport. The situation was so serious the Army was called in to support the local police in tackling the issue, with the runway finally re-opening on Friday morning. For some time now, governments around the world have been looking at different ways of addressing the dangers of drone use in areas where they pose safety risks. Here we look at some of the solutions - ranging from bazookas to eagles.


UK police release two people arrested over Gatwick airport drones

Engadget

Sussex Police have released the man and woman arrested on December 21st after determining that they're "no longer suspects" behind the multiple incidents. Don't anticipate new suspects in the future, either. Detective Chief Superintendent Jason Tingley said his force continued to "actively follow lines of investigation," but didn't hint at where those might lead. In a conversation to Sky News, Tingley said officers had found a damaged drone at the airport in Horley and were on an "expedited" effort to examine that drone for evidence. There's an increased financial motivation to bring the perpetrators in, at least.


UK police arrest two over Gatwick airport drones

Engadget

Drones flying around London's busy Gatwick airport have disrupted air travel since Wednesday evening, but now the Sussex Police Department has announced two arrests connected to the incidents. The airport reopened for service Friday morning, but the Guardian reports that another drone sighting shut down flights for about an hour around 5 PM. Police Superintendent James Collis said the arrests occurred around 10 PM (local time) Friday. There are no further details on who the police nabbed or what's behind their "criminal use of drones" but the police are remaining on site and asking the public to call in if they have any information. Proactive investigations are still on-going: we urge the public to contact us if they believe they have information that can aid us further.


Still at large: Drones responsible for shutting down one of the UK's busiest airports

Mashable

After a drone-induced shutdown, London's Gatwick Airport is back up and running again. Still at large, however, are the drones which caused around 1,000 flights to be diverted or cancelled over three days late last week, with Sussex Police investigating 67 drone sightings made by the public. SEE ALSO: This drone was built to detect and take down'rogue' drones Authorities also recovered a damaged drone, which comes after two suspects were released without charge on Sunday. Earlier, police had some doubt if there was genuine drone activity. Detective Chief Superintendent Jason Tingley told BBC News that no footage of the drone had been obtained, and that there was "always a possibility" the drone sightings could be mistaken.