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9 ways to reduce your risk of Alzheimer's

Los Angeles Times

The statistics on women and Alzheimer's disease are startling. Every 66 seconds someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer's. Two-thirds are women, according to the Alzheimer's Assn. Women in their 60s are more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's over the course of their lives as they are to develop breast cancer. Once women develop mild cognitive impairment, their cognitive decline is two times faster than men.


Melatonin For Aging: Hormone Could Ease Alzheimer's Disease, Other Sleep Problems

International Business Times

The sleep hormone melatonin could be crucial for people as they get older because of the role sleep and the body's daily rhythm play in brain health.


Alzheimer's and dementia causing plaques affected by length and quality of sleep

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Getting a good night's sleep could be the key to improving memory in later life, new research suggests. People who manage fewer than four hours a night or who wake regularly are more at risk of developing dementia. Poor quality sleep and restless nights are thought to trigger the formation of plaques on the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). People who manage fewer than four hours a night or who wake regularly are more at risk of developing dementia as poor quality sleep can trigger the formation of plaques on the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease Previous studies have shown disrupted sleep is common in people with the condition and could play a role in developing the disease. New research shows sleeping well could prevent the development of plaques - abnormal clusters of protein fragments - associated with Alzheimer's.


Healthy lifestyle traits may reduce Alzheimer's disease risk by up to 60 per cent

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A combination of different healthy lifestyle habits such as being physically active, not smoking and a high-quality diet can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's. Researchers from the Rush University Medical Center examined data on nearly 3,000 people from two longitudinal studies run by the National Institute for Aging. They found that people in the dataset who adhered to four or five'healthy behaviour' types had a 60 per cent lower chance of developing Alzheimer's disease. These included being physically active, not smoking, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption, eating a high-quality diet, and performing cognitive activities. They found that people in the dataset who adhered to four or five'healthy behaviour' types had a 60 per cent lower chance of developing Alzheimer's disease The National Institute on Aging (NIA) funded research adds to existing evidence that lifestyle factors play a part in mitigating Alzheimer's disease risk, the team said.


How to eat to beat dementia: 20 foods to nourish brains

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Last Saturday, two eminent neurologists who specialise in Alzheimer's told how their cutting-edge research has led them to believe simple lifestyle tweaks can help fend off the disease. Today and all this week, they share the personalised plan that could change your life . . . There's a fear that haunts us all: will we, or someone we love, one day develop Alzheimer's disease? Someone in Britain is diagnosed with dementia every three minutes -- it's now the leading cause of death in women and there's no known cure. No wonder we are all becoming increasingly afraid. But what if we told you that you could sharpen up your mental capacity straight away?