Artificial intelligence plays on your team in Iconary, a picture puzzle game from AI2

#artificialintelligence

This special series explores the evolving relationship between humans and machines, examining the ways that robots, artificial intelligence and automation are impacting our work and lives. For decades, the games that put artificial intelligence to the test have been played human vs. machine – whether it's checkers, chess, Go, poker, StarCraft or "Jeopardy." Why isn't there a game where the AI and the human are on the same side? Now there is, and you can play, too. Researchers at Seattle's Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence are taking the wraps off Iconary, a Pictionary-type puzzle game in which an AI and human players take turns putting together pictures and guessing what phrases the pictures signify.


An AI is playing Pictionary to figure out how the world works

MIT Technology Review

It might be a frivolous after-dinner game to you, but Pictionary could perhaps give AI programs a deeper understanding of the world. AI's lack of common sense is one of the main obstacles to the development of chatbots and voice assistants that are genuinely useful. What's more, while AI programs can trounce the best human players of many games including chess, Go, and more recently, StarCraft, mastering such games offer only a narrow measure of artificial intelligence. Learning to play chess, for instance, does nothing to help a computer play Sudoku. Researchers at the Allen Institute for AI (Ai2) believe that Pictionary could push machine intelligence beyond its current limits.


An AI is playing Pictionary to figure out how the world works

#artificialintelligence

It might be a frivolous after-dinner game to you, but Pictionary could perhaps give AI programs a deeper understanding of the world. AI's lack of common sense is one of the main obstacles to the development of chatbots and voice assistants that are genuinely useful. What's more, while AI programs can trounce the best human players of many games, including chess, Go, and (more recently) StarCraft, mastering them offers only a narrow measure of artificial intelligence. Learning to play chess, for instance, does nothing to help a computer play Sudoku. Researchers at the Allen Institute for AI (Ai2) believe that Pictionary could push machine intelligence beyond its current limits.


Pictionary-Playing AI Sketches the Future of Human-Machine Collaborations

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

What do the games of chess, Jeopardy!, Go, Texas Hold'em, and StarCraft have in common? In each of these competitive arenas, an AI has resoundingly beat the best human players in the world. These victories are astounding feats of artificial intelligence--yet they've become almost humdrum. At the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2), in Seattle, researchers set out to do something different. Their AllenAI collaborates with a human player in a Pictionary-style drawing and guessing game, which is won through human-AI cooperation.


Your Next Game Night Partner? A Computer

WIRED

When the arrow appeared next to the birdcage, I finally understood what my partner was trying to say. The game was a clone of Pictionary--I had to guess the phrase based on a drawing. My partner had initially depicted a duck next to a cage, plus a hand, and a pond. Only after I asked for another drawing and the arrow was added did I realize the hand was "releasing" the duck, not feeding it. "You win!!!" I was told, after typing in the full answer.