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2016 was the hottest year EVER recorded

Daily Mail - Science & tech

World temperatures hit a record high for the third year in a row in 2016, creeping closer to a ceiling set for global warming. The data, supported by global organisations, was issued two days before the inauguration of Donald Trump, who questions whether climate change has a human cause. Average surface temperatures over land and the oceans in 2016 were 0.94 C (1.69 F) above the 20th-century average of 13.9 C (57.0 F), according to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Average surface temperatures over land and the oceans in 2016 were 0.94 C (1.69 F) above the 20th-century average of 13.9 C (57.0 F), according to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Nasa reported almost identical data as the UK Met Office and University of East Anglia, which also track global temperatures for the United Nations, said 2016 was the hottest year on record. Temperatures, lifted both by man-made greenhouse gases and a natural El Nino event that released heat from the Pacific Ocean last year, beat the previous record in 2015, when 200 nations agreed a plan to limit global warming.


NOAA claims Earth's 16-month record heat streak has finally ended

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Federal meteorologists say Earth's 16-month streak of record high temperatures is finally over. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says last month's 60.6 degrees (15.9 Celsius) was merely the second hottest September on record for the globe. However Nasa, which averages global temperature differently, considers last month as record hot. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says last month's 60.6 degrees (15.9 Celsius) was merely the second hottest September on record for the globe. However Nasa, which averages global temperature differently, considers last month as record hot.


Last month was the second hottest May on record

Daily Mail - Science & tech

This past May was the second hottest on record, according to new data. The spring month was cooler only than May 2016, which was the warmest May in 137 years of modern record-keeping. NASA's monthly analysis reveals last month was .88 This past May was the second hottest on record, according to new data. In some areas, particularly around the Antarctic, temperatures rose by as much as 5 C above normal.


Nasa data shows April was second hottest EVER recorded

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As global temperatures continue to rise, Nasa data has shown that April 2017 was the second warmest April ever recorded. Last month was 0.88 C warmer than the average April temperature from 1951-1980, and was second only to April 2016. The worrying news comes just one month after data showed that March 2017 was the hottest March ever recorded. As global temperatures continue to rise, shocking Nasa data has shown that April 2017 was the second warmest April ever recorded. Last month was 0.88 C warmer than the average April temperature from 1951-1980, and was second only to April 2016 Scientists from Nasa's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York have been collecting global temperature data since 1880.


September is the hottest EVER as Nasa reveals record month (but admits it got the figures wrong in June)

Daily Mail - Science & tech

September 2016 was the warmest September in 136 years of modern record-keeping, Nasa has revealed. September 2016's temperature was a razor-thin 0.004 degrees Celsius warmer than the previous warmest September in 2014. The record-warm September means 11 of the past 12 consecutive months dating back to October 2015 have set new monthly high-temperature records. September 2016's temperature was a razor-thin 0.004 degrees Celsius warmer than the previous warmest September in 2014. The monthly analysis by the GISS team is assembled from publicly available data acquired by about 6,300 meteorological stations around the world, ship- and buoy-based instruments measuring sea surface temperature, and Antarctic research stations.