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DARPA to stage an AI hacking tournament at DEF CON/Black Hat

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No offense, human cybersecurity workers, but you are TOO SLOW! This slow reaction cycle has created a permanent offensive advantage. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) wants us to speed it up and grab back that time advantage by moving to automated cyber defenses: machines that can "discover, prove and fix software flaws in real-time, without any assistance." It's putting its money where its mouth is in what's being billed as the "world's first all-machine hacking tournament." The historic battle takes place in Las Vegas in a few weeks, and it will happen at the very heart of hacking.


Sorry human hackers, the government thinks you're too slow

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Pentagon research agency DARPA says people are too slow at finding and fixing security bugs and wants to see smart software take over the task. The agency released details today of a contest that will put that idea to the test at the annual DEF CON hacking conference in Las Vegas next month. Seven teams from academia and industry will pit high-powered computers provided by the agency against one another. Each team's system must run a suite of software developed by DARPA for the event. Contestants win points by looking for and triggering bugs in software run by competitors while defending their own software.


DARPA Challenge Tests AI as Cybersecurity Defenders

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Today's malicious hackers have an average of 312 days to exploit "zero-day" computer software flaws before human cybersecurity experts can find and fix those flaws. The U.S. military's main research agency focused on disruptive technologies aims to see whether artificial intelligence can do a better job of finding and fixing such exploits within a matter of seconds or minutes. This summer, seven finalist teams in the Cyber Grand Challenge the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) will do battle with AI systems that can autonomously scan rivals' network servers for exploits and protect their own servers by actively finding and fixing software flaws. The immediate rewards comes in the form of a US 2 million prize for first place, 1 million for second place, and 750,000 for third place. But in the long run, DARPA hopes the challenge results will prove autonomous AI systems have become capable enough to help humans in the never ending struggle to protect computer software and networks.


Elon Musk Warns that DARPA A.I. Hacking Challenge Will Lead to Skynet

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The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is hosting a hacking tournament that will conclude in August, in Las Vegas. Seven teams will compete for 3.75 million in prize money, and the winner will receive 2 million of that. The goal of the tournament -- the Cyber Grand Challenge -- is to build Skynet. Or so Elon Musk thinks. The actual goal is to build an automated artificial intelligence that is capable of detecting and resolving bugs in a computer security system.


Elon Musk Warns that DARPA A.I. Hacking Challenge Will Lead to Skynet

#artificialintelligence

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency recently announced the Cyber Grand Challenge, a seven-team, 3.75 million-prize-pool hacking tournament that concludes in Las Vegas this August. DARPA's stated goal is to find new strategies for countering cyberwarfare, but Elon Musk isn't buying it. In fact, he think the Cyber Grand Challenge might just leave us with something like Skynet, the hostile A.I. that routinely tries to destroy humanity in the Terminator franchise. Musk tweeted a not-so-veiled warning on Thursday morning -- and it's not the first time he's gone on the record as being fearful of a malicious supercomputer. On paper, DARPA wants to build an automated artificial intelligence that is capable of detecting and resolving bugs in a computer security system.