People with sleep apnea should take a driving test

#artificialintelligence

People with the sleep disorder were more likely to fail simulated driving tests than people without the disorder (a "control" group). Lane deviation, in particular, was a serious problem for those who failed the tests, a new study found. "Worse lane position deviation is a marker of poor driving performance and this is significantly worse in [sleep apnea] patients who fail the simulator as compared to controls," wrote Dr. Akshay Dwarakanath and colleagues at St. James' University Hospital in Leeds, England. Sleep apnea is characterized by periods of disrupted breathing throughout the night. This can lead to daytime sleepiness.


Parasite from pet cats makes people more likely to start a business

Daily Mail

No business manual has yet advised people to get a cat – but maybe they should. A study has found people infected with a parasite spread by pet cats are far more likely to start their own business or aspire to be entrepreneurs. The parasite in question is Toxoplasma gondii, which affects a third of people in Britain at some point in their lives, normally causing mild flu-like symptoms. But it can also change people's behaviour because it infects cats' prey and affects their brains in a way that makes them easier for the cat to catch. People infected with the bug are 1.7 times more likely to specialise in'management and entrepreneurship'.



Middle aged Britons are the most miserable and least fulfilled people in the country

Daily Mail

Paying off your mortgage, raising kids, caring for elderly parents... middle age can certainly be a challenge. And now a national happiness survey has revealed that 45 to 59-year-olds are in fact the most miserable and least fulfilled people in the country. Those who are young, well-educated and married have the best chance of happiness, the official study revealed yesterday. Students and those in early retirement are most likely to be content, so long as they enjoy good health, it showed. And married people are twice as likely to have low anxiety levels than anyone who is single, divorced or separated, the breakdown from the Office for National Statistics found.


Just one in 39 American people get help from strangers during a medical emergency

Daily Mail

In a time of crisis, don't count on good Samaritans to offer a helping hand. A recent study led by Cornell sociologists found that the majority of people who suffer a medical emergency in a public place are bypassed by strangers. And, the findings are even more dismal when race is considered; African-American patients were more likely to be left without help in the time before emergency responders arrive. A recent study led by Cornell sociologists found that the majority of people who suffer a medical emergency in a public place are bypassed by strangers. Researchers found that only 2.5 percent of people (just 1 in 39) receive help from strangers in the time before emergency responders arrive.