Why C Levels Need To Think About e-Learning And Artificial Intelligence

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I will dispense with any amenities and cut right to the chase. When it comes to corporate learning and training the numbers are truly staggering. Trust me, there's a lot more where this came from meaning there is no shortage of stats and research that speak to the benefits of e-Learning. In a piece last year for PC Magazine, Rob Marvin wrote something that of course struck a chord with me. I say of course because of me being the pop culture savant that I am.


Louisiana Tech University computer scientist to present groundbreaking research

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IMAGE: Dr. Ben Choi, associate professor of computer science at Louisiana Tech University, will present his research on a groundbreaking new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the computing industry... view more RUSTON, La. - Dr. Ben Choi, associate professor of computer science at Louisiana Tech University, will present his research on a groundbreaking new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the computing industry during a keynote speech next month at the International Conference on Measurement Instrumentation and Electronics. Choi will present on a foundational architecture for designing and building computers, which will utilize multiple values rather than binary as used by current computers. The many-valued logic computers should provide faster computation by increasing the speed of processing for microprocessors and the speed of data transfer between the processors and the memory as well as increasing the capacity of the memory. This technology has the potential to redefine the computing industry, which is constantly trying to increase the speed of computation and, in recent years, has run short of options. By providing a new hardware approach, the technology will push the speed limit of computing using a progressive approach which will move from two values to four values, then to eight values, then to 16 values, and so on.


The Spooky Secret Behind Artificial Intelligence's Incredible Power

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Spookily powerful artificial intelligence (AI) systems may work so well because their structure exploits the fundamental laws of the universe, new research suggests. The new findings may help answer a longstanding mystery about a class of artificial intelligence that employ a strategy called deep learning. These deep learning or deep neural network programs, as they're called, are algorithms that have many layers in which lower-level calculations feed into higher ones. Deep neural networks often perform astonishingly well at solving problems as complex as beating the world's best player of the strategy board game Go or classifying cat photos, yet know one fully understood why. It turns out, one reason may be that they are tapping into the very special properties of the physical world, said Max Tegmark, a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a co-author of the new research.


Free-standing two-legged robot conquers terrain

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MARLO, the 3D bipedal robot that belongs to electrical engineering professor Jessy Grizzle and his team of students, is starting to really figure out this walking thing. Here, robotics PhD student Ross Hartley watches as MARLO demonstrate's her ability to conquer tough terrain. Image credit: Evan Dougherty, Michigan EngineeringANN ARBOR--An unsupported bipedal robot at the University of Michigan can now walk down steep slopes, through a thin layer of snow, and over uneven and unstable ground. The robot's feedback control algorithms should be able to help other two-legged robots as well as powered prosthetic legs gain similar capabilities. "The robot has no feeling in her tiny feet, but she senses the angles of her joints--for instance, her knee angles, hip angles and the rotation angle of her torso," said Jessy Grizzle, professor of electrical engineering and computer science and of mechanical engineering.


MIT launches $27m plan to advance AI' research for good

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists have teamed up in a $27 million global initiative to ensure that artificial intelligence doesn't turn against humanity. The MIT Media Lab and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University are spearheading the effort, serving as the founding institutions. As AI becomes increasingly integral in our everyday lives, the researchers say it is necessary to bridge the gap between humans and machines, while preventing the'plagues' of society from being adopted in the process. Scientists have teamed up in a $27 million global initiative to ensure that artificial intelligence doesn't turn against humanity. The initiative, known as the Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence Fund, is backed with $27 million from the Knight Foundation, LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman, the Omidyar Network, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and Jim Pallotta, founder of the Raptor Group.