Stanford team develops high speed brain interface

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers have developed a new interface that allows people with paralysis to communicate faster than ever through brain-controlled typing. The system uses tiny electrode implants, each roughly the size of a baby aspirin, to move an on-screen cursor when a person imagines their own hand movements. According to the Stanford-led team, the system marks a'major milestone' in efforts to improve life for those with severe limb weakness and paralysis, including people with ALS and spinal cord injuries. Researchers have developed a new interface that allows people with paralysis to communicate faster than ever through brain-controlled typing. In the new study, the Stanford-led team used an intracortical brain-computer interface called the BrainGate Neural Interface System.


Paralyzed man moves fingers, plays Guitar Hero with brain implant milestone

PBS NewsHour

Nick Annetta, right, of Battelle, watches as Ian Burkhart, 24, plays a guitar video game using his paralyzed hand. A computer chip in Burkhart s brain reads his thoughts, decodes them, then sends signals to a sleeve on his arm, that allows him to move his hand. Six years ago, while swimming in the ocean surf, 24-year-old Ian Burkhart lost the ability to control his hands and legs. But today, thanks to a computer chip implanted into the motor cortex of his brain that decodes his brain activity, he can move his fingers again. He can pick up a glass and pour from it.


Paralyzed man moves fingers, plays Guitar Hero with brain implant milestone

AITopics Original Links

Nick Annetta, right, of Battelle, watches as Ian Burkhart, 24, plays a guitar video game using his paralyzed hand. A computer chip in Burkhart s brain reads his thoughts, decodes them, then sends signals to a sleeve on his arm, that allows him to move his hand. Six years ago, while swimming in the ocean surf, 24-year-old Ian Burkhart lost the ability to control his hands and legs. He dove under the surf, and the waves shoved him into a sandbar. But today, thanks to a computer chip implanted into the motor cortex of his brain that decodes his brain activity, he can move his fingers again.


Typing sentences by simply thinking is possible with new technology

PBS NewsHour

JUDY WOODRUFF: For decades, researchers have worked to create a better and more direct connection between a human brain and a computer to improve the lives of people who are paralyzed or have severe limb weakness from diseases like ALS. Those advances have been notable, but now the work is yielding groundbreaking results. CAT WISE: Dennis Degray is a 64-year-old quadriplegic who is writing a sentence on the computer screen in front of him using only his brain. A former volunteer firefighter, Degray had a bad fall 10 years ago which severed his spinal cord. As part of an early stage clinical research study led by Stanford University, Degray and two other volunteer participants with ALS had small sensors implanted in their brains in an area called the motor cortex, which controls movement.


How brains and machines can be made to work together

#artificialintelligence

IN THE gleaming facilities of the Wyss Centre for Bio and Neuroengineering in Geneva, a lab technician takes a well plate out of an incubator. Each well contains a tiny piece of brain tissue derived from human stem cells and sitting on top of an array of electrodes. A screen displays what the electrodes are picking up: the characteristic peak-and-trough wave forms of firing neurons. To see these signals emanating from disembodied tissue is weird. The firing of a neuron is the basic building block of intelligence.