Making face recognition less biased doesn't make it less scary

MIT Technology Review

In the past few years, there's been a dramatic rise in the adoption of face recognition, detection, and analysis technology. You're probably most familiar with recognition systems, like Facebook's photo-tagging recommender and Apple's FaceID, which can identify specific individuals. Detection systems, on the other hand, determine whether a face is present at all; and analysis systems try to identify aspects like gender and race. All of these systems are now being used for a variety of purposes, from hiring and retail to security and surveillance. Many people believe that such systems are both highly accurate and impartial.


CNL Software expands IPSecurityCenter to support Herta face detection software

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CNL Software has entered into a technology partnership with Herta Security under the CNL Software Technology Alliance Program. Herta develops user-friendly software solutions that enable the integration of facial recognition in security applications. According to the announcement, Herta's deep learning algorithms encode faces directly into small templates, which are very fast to compare and yield more accurate results. This provides a technological advantage when working with partners, as it allows the development of more robust, safer and efficient solutions. IPSecurityCenter PSIM takes a vendor agnostic approach to implement flexible and scalable security management software.


U.S. researchers use satellites, underwater robotic lab to create lake algae bloom warning system

The Japan Times

TOLEDO, OHIO โ€“ Satellites in space and a robot under Lake Erie's surface are part of a network of scientific tools trying to keep algae toxins out of drinking water supplies in the shallowest of the Great Lakes. It's one of the most wide-ranging freshwater monitoring systems in the U.S., researchers say, and some of its pieces soon will be watching for harmful algae on hundreds of lakes nationwide. Researchers are creating an early warning system using real-time data from satellites that in recent years have tracked algae bloom hotpots such as Florida's Lake Okeechobee and the East Coast's Chesapeake Bay. The plan is to have it in place within two years so that states in the continental U.S. can be alerted to where toxic algae is appearing before they might detect it on the surface, said Blake Schaeffer, a researcher with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "You don't have to wait until someone gets sick," said Schaeffer, one of the leaders of the project.


China's drone giant DJI hits back at U.S. security concerns

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Another Chinese tech giant is now at the center of national security concerns raised by the U.S. Senate. DJI, a Chinese company that dominates the commercial drone market in the U.S., published an 1800-word letter on Monday striking back against mounting concerns on Capitol Hill over spying, following the recent ban on the Chinese telecom giant Huawei. "The security of a company's products depends on the safeguards it employs, not where its headquarters is located," the Shenzhen-based drone maker said in an open letter to Senators on Monday. During a hearing hosted by Transportation Subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee last week, some of the experts testified that they believe that DJI has the potential to send data back to China, which poses serious risks. "American geospatial information is flown to Chinese data centers at an unprecedented level. This literally gives a Chinese company a view from above of our nation. DJI says that American data is safe, but its use of proprietary software networks means how would we know?" said Harry Wingo, Chair of the Cyber Security Department from the National Defense University.


AI for Physical Security โ€“ Analytics Jobs

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As of today, lots of companies state to assist security firms, the army, in addition to consumers prevent crime and defend their private, homes, and buildings belongings. This particular article intends to offer business leaders in the security space with a concept of what they are able to presently expect from Ai in the business of theirs. We wish this report allows company leaders in security to garner insights they are able to confidently relay to the executive teams of theirs so they are able to make educated choices when thinking about AI adoption. At the minimum, this article intends to serve as a technique of decreasing the time industry leaders in physical security spend researching AI businesses with whom they might (or might not) be keen on working. Evolv Technology claims to offer a physical security system that consists of the Evolve Edgepersonnel threat screening machine that works with the Evolv Pinpoint automated facial recognition application.