5 Intriguing Uses for Artificial Intelligence (That Aren't Killer Robots)

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Rather than leading to the violent downfall of humankind, artificial intelligence is helping people around the world do their jobs, including doctors who diagnose sepsis in patients and scientists who track endangered animals in the wild, experts said Thursday (Oct. Advancements in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) haven't always been met with enthusiasm. Famed astrophysicist Stephen Hawking warned on several occasions that a fully developed AI could destroy the human race, and Hollywood sci-fi movies are rife with fierce robots battling humans for control. But at yesterday's conference -- attended by the country's leading researchers, innovators, entrepreneurs and students -- scientists explained how newly developed AI is accelerating research and improving lives. Here is a look at five AI inventions that are already redefining technology.


This Groundbreaking Algorithm Can Spot Sepsis Before Doctors

Huffington Post - Tech news and opinion

Rather than leading to the violent downfall of humankind, artificial intelligence is helping people around the world do their jobs, including doctors who diagnose sepsis in patients and scientists who track endangered animals in the wild, experts said Thursday (Oct. Advancements in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) haven't always been met with enthusiasm. Famed astrophysicist Stephen Hawking warned on several occasions that a fully developed AI could destroy the human race, and Hollywood sci-fi movies are rife with fierce robots battling humans for control. But at Thursday's conference -- attended by the country's leading researchers, innovators, entrepreneurs and students -- scientists explained how newly developed AI is accelerating research and improving lives. Here is a look at five AI inventions that are already redefining technology.


Auto 'finprinting' identifies individual sharks as they migrate

New Scientist

Great white sharks migrate over huge distances, making it tricky to track specific individuals through the seasons. Now, a project hopes to automate their identification from photographs of their fins. The technique, known as "finprinting", uses the unique contours of a shark's dorsal fin as a biometric – rather like a human fingerprint or iris. Researchers have scrutinised fins to identify sharks for years, sometimes using software to help, but the new project is an attempt to make the whole process automatic. The system, developed by Ben Hughes and Tilo Burghardt at the University of Bristol in the UK, has been trained on 240 photographs of shark fins.


When diagnosis time means life or death, NVIDIA's advanced AI can save lives

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We may buy new smartphones and laptops every year or two, but when it comes expensive medical computers, that's not an option. There are more than three million medical equipment installed in hospitals today, and more than 100,000 new instruments added each year -- that's according Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang said at the company's GPU Technology Conference (GTC). At this rate, it would take more than 30 years to replace all the old hospital equipment. So how do we advance medical care without adding more cost? Nvidia's technique is to leverage the cloud to provide a "virtual upgrade" to existing medical equipment.


Hospitals Roll Out AI Systems to Keep Patients From Dying of Sepsis

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In hospitals, doctors and nurses keep vigilant watch over patients' vital signs and blood tests to catch the first symptoms of sepsis. In this life-threatening condition, the body responds to an infection with widespread inflammation that can lead to organ failure. Cases can progress rapidly to severe sepsis and then to septic shock, which has a mortality rate of almost 50 percent in the United States. But even the most vigilant humans get tired, make mistakes, and miss subtle patterns. That's why several hospitals are experimenting with artificially intelligent sepsis detectors.