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Just One View: Invariances in Inferotemporal Cell Tuning

Neural Information Processing Systems

In macaque inferotemporal cortex (IT), neurons have been found to respond selectivelyto complex shapes while showing broad tuning ("invariance") withrespect to stimulus transformations such as translation and scale changes and a limited tuning to rotation in depth.


Just One View: Invariances in Inferotemporal Cell Tuning

Neural Information Processing Systems

In macaque inferotemporal cortex (IT), neurons have been found to respond selectively to complex shapes while showing broad tuning ("invariance") with respect to stimulus transformations such as translation and scale changes and a limited tuning to rotation in depth.


Just One View: Invariances in Inferotemporal Cell Tuning

Neural Information Processing Systems

In macaque inferotemporal cortex (IT), neurons have been found to respond selectively to complex shapes while showing broad tuning ("invariance") with respect to stimulus transformations such as translation and scale changes and a limited tuning to rotation in depth.


Neural representation of action sequences: how far can a simple snippet-matching model take us?

Neural Information Processing Systems

The macaque Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS) is a brain area that receives and integrates inputs from both the ventral and dorsal visual processing streams (thought to specialize in form and motion processing respectively). For the processing of articulated actions, prior work has shown that even a small population of STS neurons contains sufficient information for the decoding of actor invariant to action, action invariant to actor, as well as the specific conjunction of actor and action. This paper addresses two questions. First, what are the invariance properties of individual neural representations (rather than the population representation) in STS? Second, what are the neural encoding mechanisms that can produce such individual neural representations from streams of pixel images? We find that a baseline model, one that simply computes a linear weighted sum of ventral and dorsal responses to short action “snippets”, produces surprisingly good fits to the neural data. Interestingly, even using inputs from a single stream, both actor-invariance and action-invariance can be produced simply by having different linear weights.


Measuring Invariances in Deep Networks

Neural Information Processing Systems

For many pattern recognition tasks, the ideal input feature would be invariant to multiple confounding properties (such as illumination and viewing angle, in computer visionapplications). Recently, deep architectures trained in an unsupervised manner have been proposed as an automatic method for extracting useful features. However, it is difficult to evaluate the learned features by any means other than using them in a classifier. In this paper, we propose a number of empirical tests that directly measure the degree to which these learned features are invariant to different input transformations. We find that stacked autoencoders learn modestly increasingly invariant features with depth when trained on natural images. We find that convolutional deep belief networks learn substantially more invariant features in each layer. These results further justify the use of "deep" vs. "shallower" representations, butsuggest that mechanisms beyond merely stacking one autoencoder on top of another may be important for achieving invariance. Our evaluation metrics canalso be used to evaluate future work in deep learning, and thus help the development of future algorithms.