What the Paris climate agreement withdrawal means for U.S. economy

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

President Donald Trump says the U.S. will withdraw from the Paris climate change agreement. SAN FRANCISCO -- President Trump's decision Thursday to exit the Paris climate agreement is likely to give a small and immediate lift to the oil and coal industry, which makes good on a persistent campaign promise. But, economist and energy experts warn, over time the controversial decision to drop out of the international pact to help stem climate change may hamper the nation's ability to financially capitalize on the globe's shift to renewable resources. Specifically, leaving the Paris agreement jeopardizes the U.S.'s ability to be a global leader in new clean technology developments and sell those insights to a world hungry for cheap energy, experts say. "The biggest danger in leaving the accord is you lose your seat at the negotiating table for all climate talks to come," says Shayle Kann of GTM Research, which does market analysis on next-generation energy solutions.



'Shortsighted, wrong': Apple, Facebook among tech giants to reject Paris pullout

The Guardian

The heads of some of the largest and most influential American technology companies expressed their "deep disappointment" at Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the US from the Paris climate accord. In separate statements and messages on social media, leaders of Apple, Google, Twitter, Amazon, Facebook, Tesla, Microsoft and IBM declared climate change an "urgent" threat that required a global effort to combat. "Decision to withdraw from the #ParisAgreeement was wrong for our planet," said Apple CEO Tim Cook tweeted on Thursday. "Apple is committed to fight climate change and we will never waver." Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey called the decision "incredibly shortsighted" and a "move backwards by the federal government".


Business leaders bash Trump's decision to withdraw from Paris climate accord

Los Angeles Times

President Trump stands next to the podium after speaking about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday in the Rose Garden of the White House. President Trump stands next to the podium after speaking about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday in the Rose Garden of the White House. Corporate executives generally shy away from addressing hot-button political issues for fear of alienating customers. But after President Trump announced Thursday that he will withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate change accord, a who's who of Fortune Magazine cover models took to social media to criticize the decision. Here are the reactions of some of the nation's most prominent business leaders: 'Climate change is an urgent issue' Brad Smith, president of Microsoft Corp., said in a lengthy statement Thursday that the technology giant was "disappointed" with Trump's decision.


The Latest: France, Germany, Italy: Pact can't be revisited

Associated Press

President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. German Chancellor Angela Merkel (AHN'-geh-lah MEHR'-kuhl) says she regrets President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris climate accord. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke (ZIN'-kee) is applauding President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement.