U.S. Air Force invests in Explainable-AI for unmanned aircraft

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Software star-up, Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC), has received funding from the U.S. Air Force to incorporate the company's 3D image recognition technology into unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and drones for aerial image and object recognition. ZAC's in-house image recognition software is based on Explainable-AI (XAI), where computer-generated image results can be understood by human experts. ZAC – based in Potomac, Maryland – is the first to demonstrate XAI, where various attributes and details of 3D objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," says Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," adds Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


US Air Force funds Explainable-AI for UAV tech

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Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC) of Potomac, MD announced on August 27 that it is funded by the US Air Force, to use ZAC's detailed 3D image recognition technology, based on Explainable-AI, for drones (unmanned aerial vehicle or UAV) for aerial image/object recognition. ZAC is the first to demonstrate Explainable-AI, where various attributes and details of 3D (three dimensional) objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," said Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "For complex tasks, such as drone vision, you need ZAC's superior technology to handle detailed 3D image recognition." "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as Deep Convolutional Neural Networks, even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," continued Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


How can attackers abuse artificial intelligence? - Help Net Security

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly finding applications in nearly every walk of life. Self-driving cars, social media networks, cybersecurity companies, and everything in between uses it. But a new report published by the SHERPA consortium – an EU project studying the impact of AI on ethics and human rights – finds that while human attackers have access to machine learning techniques, they currently focus most of their efforts on manipulating existing AI systems for malicious purposes instead of creating new attacks that would use machine learning. The study's primary focus is on how malicious actors can abuse AI, machine learning, and smart information systems. The researchers identify a variety of potentially malicious uses for AI that are well within reach of today's attackers, including the creation of sophisticated disinformation and social engineering campaigns.


AI, Threat Intelligence and The Cyber Arms Race: SonicWall CEO Bill Conner Joins Chertoff Group Security Series Event SonicWall

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SonicWall President and CEO Bill Conner was featured as part of an exclusive group of cybersecurity thought-leaders at The Chertoff Group Security Series Event, "AI, Threat Intelligence and The Cyber Arms Race," on June 18. Conner was flanked by Christopher Krebs, Director of Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) in the Department of Homeland Security; Dimitri Kusnezov, Deputy Under Secretary for Artificial Intelligence & Technology, Department of Energy; along with panel moderator Chad Sweet, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, The Chertoff Group. Together, they took to the stage to discuss how AI solutions are being leveraged to prevent, detect and respond to the cyber threats attacking both critical public infrastructure and the private sector. The wide-ranging discussion took on everything from election cybersecurity to self-driving cars, but was grounded by a focus on how AI is increasingly growing in importance when running cyber defenses in both the public and private sectors. With this in mind, they looked at the increasing number of'have and have-nots' in these areas with Conner pointing out that an underfunded agency or a small company simply doesn't "have the resource -- capital or human" to defeat a major cyberattack without AI-based cyber defenses such as SonicWall Real-Time Deep Memory InspectionTM (RTDMI) that can both detect and prevent existing and never-before-seen cyberattacks as they appear.


The Impact of Automation and Artificial Intelligence: Part 1 - Reynolds Center

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As technology continues to grow, here are some ways you should start thinking about how automation and artificial intelligence will impact local businesses. Automation has already shaken up many blue collar industries, but it's set to change white collar industries as well. Revenue from artificial Intelligence software will grow from a $644 million in 2016 to nearly $39 billion in 2025, according to IBM. As this technology grows, there are many chances for technologists to implement AI into many facets of our lives and careers. We're already used to virtual assistance like Siri and Alexa, and with more sophisticated forms of artificial intelligence these virtual assistants will be able to give us direction on how to get to the store, while also telling us to get better exercise and other life tips.