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LOOCV for Evaluating Machine Learning Algorithms

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The Leave-One-Out Cross-Validation, or LOOCV, procedure is used to estimate the performance of machine learning algorithms when they are used to make predictions on data not used to train the model. It is a computationally expensive procedure to perform, although it results in a reliable and unbiased estimate of model performance. Although simple to use and no configuration to specify, there are times when the procedure should not be used, such as when you have a very large dataset or a computationally expensive model to evaluate. In this tutorial, you will discover how to evaluate machine learning models using leave-one-out cross-validation. LOOCV for Evaluating Machine Learning Algorithms Photo by Heather Harvey, some rights reserved.


Model evaluation, model selection, and algorithm selection in machine learning

#artificialintelligence

In contrast to k-nearest neighbors, a simple example of a parametric method would be logistic regression, a generalized linear model with a fixed number of model parameters: a weight coefficient for each feature variable in the dataset plus a bias (or intercept) unit. While the learning algorithm optimizes an objective function on the training set (with exception to lazy learners), hyperparameter optimization is yet another task on top of it; here, we typically want to optimize a performance metric such as classification accuracy or the area under a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve. Thinking back of our discussion about learning curves and pessimistic biases in Part II, we noted that a machine learning algorithm often benefits from more labeled data; the smaller the dataset, the higher the pessimistic bias and the variance -- the sensitivity of our model towards the way we partition the data. We start by splitting our dataset into three parts, a training set for model fitting, a validation set for model selection, and a test set for the final evaluation of the selected model.


Model evaluation, model selection, and algorithm selection in machine learning

#artificialintelligence

Almost every machine learning algorithm comes with a large number of settings that we, the machine learning researchers and practitioners, need to specify. These tuning knobs, the so-called hyperparameters, help us control the behavior of machine learning algorithms when optimizing for performance, finding the right balance between bias and variance. Hyperparameter tuning for performance optimization is an art in itself, and there are no hard-and-fast rules that guarantee best performance on a given dataset. In Part I and Part II, we saw different holdout and bootstrap techniques for estimating the generalization performance of a model. We learned about the bias-variance trade-off, and we computed the uncertainty of our estimates. In this third part, we will focus on different methods of cross-validation for model evaluation and model selection. We will use these cross-validation techniques to rank models from several hyperparameter configurations and estimate how well they generalize to independent datasets. Previously, we used the holdout method or different flavors of bootstrapping to estimate the generalization performance of our predictive models.


Improve Your Model Performance using Cross Validation (in Python / R)

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This article was originally published on November 18, 2015 and updated on April 30, 2018. One of the most interesting and challenging things about hackathons is getting a high score on both public and private leaderboards. I have closely monitored the series of Data Hackathons and found an interesting trend. This trend is based on participant rankings on the public and private leaderboards. One thing that stood out was that participants who rank higher on the public leaderboard lose their position after their ranks gets validated on the private leaderboard.


Model Evaluation, Model Selection, and Algorithm Selection in Machine Learning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The correct use of model evaluation, model selection, and algorithm selection techniques is vital in academic machine learning research as well as in many industrial settings. This article reviews different techniques that can be used for each of these three subtasks and discusses the main advantages and disadvantages of each technique with references to theoretical and empirical studies. Further, recommendations are given to encourage best yet feasible practices in research and applications of machine learning. Common methods such as the holdout method for model evaluation and selection are covered, which are not recommended when working with small datasets. Different flavors of the bootstrap technique are introduced for estimating the uncertainty of performance estimates, as an alternative to confidence intervals via normal approximation if bootstrapping is computationally feasible. Common cross-validation techniques such as leave-one-out cross-validation and k-fold cross-validation are reviewed, the bias-variance trade-off for choosing k is discussed, and practical tips for the optimal choice of k are given based on empirical evidence. Different statistical tests for algorithm comparisons are presented, and strategies for dealing with multiple comparisons such as omnibus tests and multiple-comparison corrections are discussed. Finally, alternative methods for algorithm selection, such as the combined F-test 5x2 cross-validation and nested cross-validation, are recommended for comparing machine learning algorithms when datasets are small.